Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

Paradox5

Full Sail University

Recommended Posts

Son 2 has decided he wants to go here. Any others have experiences to share? Anyone done the online version?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

see:

https://www.niche.com/colleges/full-sail-university/

I am not a big fan of "For Profits"  but the majors look quite practical what is your student interested in.

added:

https://www.gradreports.com/colleges/full-sail-university

some degrees get high grades and on campus preferred versus online classes.

 

 

 

 

Edited by MarkT
added grade reports link
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would strongly urge him to be on campus, for all of the usual reasons but also because you get jobs in those industries by knowing people. And he will know more people if he is on campus and involved. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My ds is a Full Sail graduate who attended the brick and mortar school. His degree is in show production -- as in live music shows, so it was heavy on sound mixing. The technology was all state of the art, and classes were all hands on. It didn't have enough of what he specifically was interested in, lighting design, yet he had job offers upon graduation and wound up with a full time position that he loves. (Disneyland stage technician -- he does all kinds of lighting stuff at the parks here in CA.) His classmates are all working full time in the industry, some touring with bands and off Broadway productions. 

The pro of attending Full Sail was that there weren't all the pesky undergraduate general ed courses. My ds was an out of the box student, and needed an outside the box college. What he does for a living shouldn't require a university degree, but these jobs are often advertised with the requirement of a BA. Full Sail got him that BA in a unique, hands on, outside the box way. 

Another pro was the connections made with industry pros. One of his profs was the tv director for the Super Bowl, another did all the sound mixing for the Orlando Magic games. They were not a factor in my son's employment, but as his classmates are all working in the wider industry, should he decide to do something else, he's got a great network to tap into. 

You go through the program with the same cohort -- you don't have to schedule classes, the program is laid out for you, and every month you have 2 intensive classes. The pro is that you have a tight knit group, the con is that there are no electives, no wiggle room to fashion a program that fits your unique interests. If you fail a class, you take again the next month, and slip into another cohort.

Classes for show production and music recording are literally scheduled 24 hours a day. They only have so many venues with the equipment, so the rooms are in use all day long. My ds would have a sound design lab from midnight to 4am!! BUT, it is how you work in the industry. If you are setting up or striking a live venue, you do it overnight

The school offers admission to anyone and everyone, meaning that lots of the students who start out have zero work ethic and they burn out and quit early on. If they took out student loans, they are still stuck paying them -- it is the truly distasteful side of the for profit college business plan. Full Sail recruits heavily and has flashy tours to lure in new students, complete with all the shiny info on how to get loans. 

I know one young woman who was in an on-line program, but I don't know if she finished it or not. Last I heard she is happily working as a manager at a local playhouse/theater.

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He is interested in Game Design and Screenwriting. He is an extraordinary writer but I'm his mom, so you know.). He will have his AAS before he goes.

If he goes, he would be on campus only. He really detests online classes. He likes the connection and interaction between the professor and the students. 

I'm not so keen on 24 hr class times! I would worry about his safety tromping to and from classes especially because he would not have a car. Are classes 7 days a week, too?

We have concerns about housing. How does that work? He would prefer roommates who are from our religious background or at least who have high moral standards. (No flame-throwers, please. It would be Son 2's first time away from home like ever.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am going to PM you.

 

As for housing, it looks like they have apartments nearby that they can set your son up in, but they don't actually manage.  There is no food service, etc.....that is what we were looking at with Laguna College of Art and Design when my son was interested in going there.  It wasn't going to work for him.  He doesn't drive.  He was going to go if we moved there and live at home.  We haven't moved yet!  Long story of no jobs for DH, but that is not relevant to this post. 

 

Edited by DawnM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/14/2018 at 11:15 PM, Paradox5 said:

I'm not so keen on 24 hr class times! I would worry about his safety tromping to and from classes especially because he would not have a car. Are classes 7 days a week, too?

We have concerns about housing. How does that work? He would prefer roommates who are from our religious background or at least who have high moral standards. (No flame-throwers, please. It would be Son 2's first time away from home like ever.)

 

 

5 to 6 days a week, 32 to 40 hours per week. One reason for the 24-hr class times is that it is the nature of the entertainment industry; it's good bc students find out early on if they can deal with that kind of schedule. 

Housing has a list of apartments with lots of information, and some are walking distance. They do not set you up in the apartment and they do not match roommates. What they will do is provide a list of potential roommates based on a questionnaire. It is up to you to contact them and match. The campus will have a diverse range of values and behavior - students included, but also the industry professionals teaching and working with students. 

Full Sail is not going to be a typical undergrad experience, which is great for some people and not for others. Can he visit to get a feel for it and talk to some teachers? 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, katilac said:

 

5 to 6 days a week, 32 to 40 hours per week. One reason for the 24-hr class times is that it is the nature of the entertainment industry; it's good bc students find out early on if they can deal with that kind of schedule. 

Housing has a list of apartments with lots of information, and some are walking distance. They do not set you up in the apartment and they do not match roommates. What they will do is provide a list of potential roommates based on a questionnaire. It is up to you to contact them and match. The campus will have a diverse range of values and behavior - students included, but also the industry professionals teaching and working with students. 

Full Sail is not going to be a typical undergrad experience, which is great for some people and not for others. Can he visit to get a feel for it and talk to some teachers? 


Laguna had a shuttle to the local apartments, but they did not have a shuttle to the grocery store.  I guess it was 3/4 mile away and considered "walkable?"  Or you had to rely on others for a ride.  We knew it wouldn't work for my son, but others may find it fine.

I don't know what the food situation would be at Full Sail.  It was a very brief glance for us when my son was looking at colleges.

But it is something to consider and ask about.

Edited by DawnM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course, this thread is from July and her son may already be there and love it.  She hasn't responded lately.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, DawnM said:

Of course, this thread is from July and her son may already be there and love it.  She hasn't responded lately.

 

If so, I hope she updates! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nope-- he's not going until next summer after he finishes his AAS degree. We are looking at other options like SCAD, too. Right now, we are still info gathering.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/16/2018 at 11:57 AM, katilac said:

 

5 to 6 days a week, 32 to 40 hours per week. One reason for the 24-hr class times is that it is the nature of the entertainment industry; it's good bc students find out early on if they can deal with that kind of schedule. 

Housing has a list of apartments with lots of information, and some are walking distance. They do not set you up in the apartment and they do not match roommates. What they will do is provide a list of potential roommates based on a questionnaire. It is up to you to contact them and match. The campus will have a diverse range of values and behavior - students included, but also the industry professionals teaching and working with students. 

Full Sail is not going to be a typical undergrad experience, which is great for some people and not for others. Can he visit to get a feel for it and talk to some teachers? 

 

Just quoting here to say "yes" to all the above. (Where's the little "I agree" emoji when you need it?!) 

I cannot imagine going to Full Sail without a car, partly due to the crazy class schedule and partly because of food. But, my ds just texted me to say that he had classmates who did NOT have cars, so I guess it is doable. There isn't on campus food, but Costco is across the street, and there is a McDonalds and a sandwich place nearby. Once you are there a few months you get to know your classmates and can catch rides, and of course Uber and Lyft are always available. I don't know how useful the bus system is.

Jenny can add to this, but it seemed to us that being a pedestrian in Orlando is a dangerous prospect, with few side walks and one of the highest pedestrian fatality rates in the country. My son's best friend was hit by a car while he was crossing a street in the crosswalk  -- the car ran a red light. It is a miracle he is alive. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, JennW in SoCal said:

I cannot imagine going to Full Sail without a car, partly due to the crazy class schedule and partly because of food. But, my ds just texted me to say that he had classmates who did NOT have cars, so I guess it is doable. There isn't on campus food, but Costco is across the street, and there is a McDonalds and a sandwich place nearby. Once you are there a few months you get to know your classmates and can catch rides, and of course Uber and Lyft are always available. I don't know how useful the bus system is.

Jenny can add to this, but it seemed to us that being a pedestrian in Orlando is a dangerous prospect, with few side walks and one of the highest pedestrian fatality rates in the country. My son's best friend was hit by a car while he was crossing a street in the crosswalk  -- the car ran a red light. It is a miracle he is alive. 

1

 

I can't compare the programs, but SCAD is a bit more typical in having dorms, a dining hall, and so forth. 

My dd doesn't have a car at her campus, and she rarely has trouble getting rides because so many students have cars. And, like you noted, she uses Uber and Lyft as well. 

I don't live in Orlando but I've visited Mickey often, and I agree that I wouldn't want to be a pedestrian! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, katilac said:

 

I can't compare the programs, but SCAD is a bit more typical in having dorms, a dining hall, and so forth. 

My dd doesn't have a car at her campus, and she rarely has trouble getting rides because so many students have cars. And, like you noted, she uses Uber and Lyft as well. 

I don't live in Orlando but I've visited Mickey often, and I agree that I wouldn't want to be a pedestrian! 

 

SCAD has two US Campuses.  The Atlanta campus is more compact and walkable.  They have dorms, a dining hall or two, and you can walk to classes easily.  SCAD Savannah is spread out over 3.5 miles, throughout the city of Savannah, as they have bought more and more historic buildings and land.  It is a much larger campus.  But they have shuttles to use to get around, 14 dining locations with your dining card, etc....and the shuttles go to Target and the grocery store on Saturdays and Sundays.  

As far as comparing things......we looked at ranking and took that into consideration to some degree.  And for rankings it depends on the program, obviously, but for my son, anything in the top 10 was a consideration.  But ultimately, it came down to location too.  My son is on the spectrum and didn't want to be a plane ride away, he wanted to be a driving distance away, so given all of that, we chose the best program FOR HIM.  

We looked at RISD, SCAD, Laguna (when we were looking at moving out there, still are but that is a whole different post!), CalArts, and Ringling.  

Not sure anyone wants to hear all about our search, but it was a long one and we researched each school, what they offered, how much they gave in aid, location, how well they connected students to internships and jobs, etc......

I am NOT an artist, so this was all very new territory for me.  I have two very artistic sons (one in drawing and animation and the other in film) and so looking at Art Colleges and how to look at them was a completely different ballgame.

 

OP:  One thing I will say......a traditional AA from a CC isn't necessarily transferable to being a Junior when you enter Art College.  Most of them transfer classes by class, not degrees.   So, for example, to get an AA at our CC, you need 2 math classes, 2 humanities, etc.....well, Art college only requires one of each of those, so that is all that transferred.  

IF we had known he was going to Art school after CC, we would have done things differently and only taken classes that we knew would transfer and would not have bothered with the AA.  It really means nothing if it is a general AA.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since he skipped high school, his AA degree was important to him to complete. He has taken the GED, if anyone cares to know.

We know his degree will not transfer full on. That is ok. 

I think we will chuck Full Sail off our list for now. Any other ideas or reviews of other schools I am allears! Any in Texas? I haven’t found good options yet here. He is interested in game design- the guy who comes up with the ideas, stories, etc..

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://successfulstudent.org/best-video-game-colleges/

 

My son started off in game design at our local community college.  The more he got into it, the more he realized he wanted to do the Animation portion, which our CC had.....sort of, but not quality enough.  He was able to get a 6 month internship with a local game company though before he went off to an Art College.  He really enjoyed it, even though the games they create aren't even the kind he likes to play!

Full Sail actually came in 13th here, not too shabby!I

I don't see any in TX on the list, but that doesn't mean there aren't any.  That list changes yearly as the majors are such a growing field!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My niece is graduating in December from Texas A&M with a degree in visualization. My understanding is that is a customizable art degree; she has an on-campus studio where she works on traditional artwork and also had lots of computer classes to learn digital art, including animation. (I am told Pixar often hires from their program.) Anyway, it might be worth investigating to see if they have a game design track, since you would like a Texas school.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It seems that there are some grads from A&M that go into the gaming industry: https://today.tamu.edu/2018/06/21/25-texas-am-viz-lab-grads-contributed-to-incredibles-2/

"Visualization graduates have achieved success as creative directors, computer animators, university professors and software designers, with the majority working in the animation, visual effects and electronic gaming industries."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am just going to put this out there.

Many colleges have something "like" game design or animation or whatever, but once my son knew what he was looking at and looking for, he toured two schools that had a degree in things like visualization or digital media and found them greatly lacking what he felt he needed to adequately prepare him for what he wanted to do.

I am not saying you CAN'T ever get into the industry that way, but I am saying it may not do what you want it to do in terms of preparing you for what you want.  I don't honestly know the terms to throw out there, my son does, but just like any other degree, I think it best to go to the places where you can actually learn exactly what you want to do to get to where you want to go.

Go to gaming sites and see where the people who are designing went to school.  

Talk to gamers who are already in the business and get their input.

Ask schools about their internship rates and job placements after graduating rates.  Find out where the graduates are working.  Are they going to places like Blizzard, Epic, Pixar, Disney, etc....for gaming?  

Does your son know where he wants to work?  Does he have a "dream job" in mind?  My son's dream job is Blizzard.  He knows that may change, he knows he probably will have to work his way up to working there, but he knows what they are looking for and what he needs to learn, etc....

Also, does your community college offer game design?  Ours does.  My son started there, it really helped him decide what he wanted, however, he doesn't feel he learned much there, other than to figure out what he actually wanted to do.  He has actually asked us if it is ok for him to retake 2 of the classes because he feels he wasn't adequately prepared for moving on to the next level class from just the CC, BUT, it might allow your son to get a better feel for things and gain some awareness of a speciality, etc....and it might count as a general ed for something like art.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...