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ElizabethB

New phoneme post and video that is a great representation of phonemes!

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With Pom Poms!!

https://www.spelfabet.com.au/2018/07/pom-pom-phonemes/

There is a link to a video at the end.  She has a lot of good videos on YouTube.

I show them in my blending page as different size lego blocks, but I really like the pom pom representation!

https://www.thephonicspage.org/On Reading/blendingwords.html

 

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I didn't have a chance to watch her pompom video yet, but I'm planning to get some of her ebook workbooks to have ds work through this year. They seem like they could be independent work for him, and he could use more of that. 

She had another really good video lately where she reviewed the connection between learning to read and learning to spell. It was stuff I had pieced together from other places, but still it was interesting to see all those components (phonograms, semantics, syntax, orthography, morphemes, etc.) all pulled together in one explanation. Nice video if anyone is pondering that. 

 

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Ok, I'm watching her pom-pom video, and her demonstration with them for the tiers of intervention is HILARIOUS!!! LOL Just to rock your world though, I've been thinking recently that maybe my whole perception of the reading disability should change. The SLPs are *saying* dyslexia is a language disability, but the psychs, people doing the intervention all go to the end product they want (awareness of sounds, decoding) and work directly on that. It makes sense if SLD Reading/dyslexia is a decoding disability. But then why are the SLPs calling it a language disability and why are psychs saying the kids still fall behind in language?

So hold that thought. Let's say my ds is atypical and isn't reflective of anyone else's dyslexia or at least typical dyslexia. Now he *does* have a homozygous mutation for a known dyslexia gene, yes. So if we wanted to say are you dyslexic by genes, by birth, YES he is. (Another rag on the Eides but whatever.) And his gene for dyslexia is specifically known to affect phonological processing. So we have data on that.

So fast forward. I start doing language work with my ds 2 months ago. We've been doing multiple hours a day of things working at the WORD level. We have NOT been working on decoding or syllables. We've been doing workbooks for use of verbs, pronouns, semantics (antonyms, synonyms, attributes, functions, et.c) etc etc. etc. After 6 weeks of that... drum roll... my ds started making jokes with homonyms (which were NOT what we were working on, not at all) and started making jokes with morphology (parts of words, things like suffixes). And he started, all on his own, noticing spelling of words and mentioning spelling and talking about spelling and bringing up spelling. BLOWS MY MIND.

So we know he has autism, and apparently the work helped his brain start realizing words have meanings. He had scripted and memorized paragraphs and broken it down to phrases, but he wasn't understanding at the word level. So as we did therapy that got him understanding and breaking down and noticing at the word level, his brilliant (haha) little brain decided to take it further to the bits of words level!

At least that's how it looks to me. And THAT totally blows my mind, because it blows sky high my previous assumption that I had to work on all these pieces. What we had was astonishing disconnects in development, and when we put the development back on track, the pieces have started righting themselves.

I don't know what that means for other kids with more typical dyslexia, but I really, really wonder. I wonder because the SLPs are saying if you dig further there will be more with a dyslexic, that it's a language processing disorder, not only phonological processing. And I look at how ds had MEMORIZED without meaning or use or cognizance so much, but there was no click. I had come on the boards saying I could but it wasn't sensible  somehow or useful to him or timely. He was plenty smart to use it, but I think it was like memorizing 30k separate pieces of gibberish instead of making a file folder in the brain for yourself called spelling and realizing it's there and that you want to access it.

I have no clue. I'm just gabbing I guess. It has just totally blown my paradigm, because I would have never thought that working on LANGUAGE would turn on SPELLING, and I don't know how much that's true for other kids as well.

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I do adore the Spelfabet lady though. She's funny and creative and does great videos. I just haven't printed and started her materials. We're sort of between things, in a lull, so I guess I could. I think ds is going to go through them quickly now that his brain is actually comprehending at that level. I had taught him through Barton 4 and done all the Spelling Success games with him for every level. He had all the pieces, but there was no meaning. Guess I've been scared I'd try again and flop, sigh. But if he's actually ready, it could be way cool. It will be good to use it a fresh way.

I also picked up some clear alphabet stamps at Target yesterday (on the long walk that wore me out, but that's another story!). I thought I might put them in keyboard order and let him spell words using just the home row. I thought it would be a way to reinforce the key order without using fine motor or making it stressful. Dr. Cotter of RightStart says to do that with letter magnets or montessori letters or whatever, to rearrange them to keyboard order to be more useful. I thought it was kind of smart but hadn't actually done it. This seemed a good way to try. They were maybe $3.

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1 hour ago, PeterPan said:

 

So fast forward. I start doing language work with my ds 2 months ago. We've been doing multiple hours a day of things working at the WORD level. We have NOT been working on decoding or syllables. We've been doing workbooks for use of verbs, pronouns, semantics (antonyms, synonyms, attributes, functions, et.c) etc etc. etc. After 6 weeks of that... drum roll... my ds started making jokes with homonyms (which were NOT what we were working on, not at all) and started making jokes with morphology (parts of words, things like suffixes). And he started, all on his own, noticing spelling of words and mentioning spelling and talking about spelling and bringing up spelling. BLOWS MY MIND.

So we know he has autism, and apparently the work helped his brain start realizing words have meanings. He had scripted and memorized paragraphs and broken it down to phrases, but he wasn't understanding at the word level. So as we did therapy that got him understanding and breaking down and noticing at the word level, his brilliant (haha) little brain decided to take it further to the bits of words level!

At least that's how it looks to me. And THAT totally blows my mind, because it blows sky high my previous assumption that I had to work on all these pieces. What we had was astonishing disconnects in development, and when we put the development back on track, the pieces have started righting themselves.

I don't know what that means for other kids with more typical dyslexia, but I really, really wonder. I wonder because the SLPs are saying if you dig further there will be more with a dyslexic, that it's a language processing disorder, not only phonological processing. And I look at how ds had MEMORIZED without meaning or use or cognizance so much, but there was no click. I had come on the boards saying I could but it wasn't sensible  somehow or useful to him or timely. He was plenty smart to use it, but I think it was like memorizing 30k separate pieces of gibberish instead of making a file folder in the brain for yourself called spelling and realizing it's there and that you want to access it.

I have no clue. I'm just gabbing I guess. It has just totally blown my paradigm, because I would have never thought that working on LANGUAGE would turn on SPELLING, and I don't know how much that's true for other kids as well.

That is an interesting observation!

With my remedial students, I notice that once they get the piece that they are missing, a lot of other, seemingly unrelated things seem to click.

For example, most of my students do not have dyslexia but have been taught to guess and do not automatically sound things out.  Once the sounding out starts to click and their reading is on an upward slope, they start to do better in all of their other subjects, including math, even ones whose parents had been reading their math for them so that there was little to language component involved in their math.  This change occurs at the point when it clicks, not at the point at which their reading grade level has improved enough to make a difference in how well they can read their other subjects.

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31 minutes ago, ElizabethB said:

That is an interesting observation!

With my remedial students, I notice that once they get the piece that they are missing, a lot of other, seemingly unrelated things seem to click.

For example, most of my students do not have dyslexia but have been taught to guess and do not automatically sound things out.  Once the sounding out starts to click and their reading is on an upward slope, they start to do better in all of their other subjects, including math, even ones whose parents had been reading their math for them so that there was little to language component involved in their math.  This change occurs at the point when it clicks, not at the point at which their reading grade level has improved enough to make a difference in how well they can read their other subjects.

That is interesting! I guess with autism, we just have a lot more things to get to click, mercy. But still that is fascinating that you're seeing that. 

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34 minutes ago, PeterPan said:

That is interesting! I guess with autism, we just have a lot more things to get to click, mercy. But still that is fascinating that you're seeing that. 

The majority of my students have no underlying problems, they just suffer from sight word teaching.  But, I have worked with a lot of students over the years, and some of them have underlying problems.

My students with underlying speech or language problems require more things to click and it is more of a process...

Interestingly, all of the kids I've known with autism have been good readers from a young age, one was most likely hyperlexic and talked like Eugene in Adventures in Odyssey.  My son was the only one in his AWANAs class who would/could talk to him.  (They were both 5 or 6 at the time, it was a while ago.)  My son is outgoing and geeky, he has always been able to figure out how to talk to kids on the spectrum and will hang out with them if they don't have friends.

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Oh my, I love the part when she explains the "real" spelling of "together" - how we really hear the schwa at the end, but really it's spelled "er." Love that Australian accent.

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21 minutes ago, ElizabethB said:

all of the kids I've known with autism have been good readers from a young age, one was most likely hyperlexic and talked like Eugene in Adventures in Odyssey.

Yeah, that's that traditional aspergers kind of presentation. Ds was hyperlexic (or at least that's the word that fits it to me) for a while with Barton, because we got his decoding off the ground but didn't address his language issues. He has such a strong ability to script and memorize, that until we ran super-detailed testing, nobody fathomed how deep his language issues were. So working on language helped him start to read on his own, but that was only environmental print. He still doesn't read books. He *can* read, but he doesn't pick up books and choose to read them at all. I've decided (right or wrong, sigh) to focus on building up comprehension as much as possible to see if that would solve it rather than calling it a behavioral (ie. bring out the ABA and force it) issue. That's what we're working on now.

Interestingly, the people ds does best with often have SLDs. I don't know if it's that they need him or if they're creative like him or what. And yes, that would be a very special friend to have, one who's strong enough to put up with stuff and defend you and like you just because. :wub:

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2 hours ago, PeterPan said:

Yeah, that's that traditional aspergers kind of presentation.

Yeah..., no! That's more like internet misinformation or misinterpretation.

From the Attwood website:

What is Asperger's Syndrome

http://www.tonyattwood.com.au/about-aspergers/what-is-aspergers

My 14 year old has been officially diagnosed with Asperger's. It is on his report next to the new DSM-5 ASD diagnosis. He was never hyperlexic or echolalic. I wasted the money buying the Hyperlexia 2 from Linguisystems for him and it was like giving a board book to a 9-year-old neurotypical kid at the time.

My youngest son (currently 9) was echolalic (delayed echolalia), not hyperlexic. Both my boys were early readers and were decoding before age 4. My 9-year-old who is diagnosed ASD not AS, knew the alphabet (letter names and sounds before age 2). My oldest knew letter names and sounds in two languages before age two and a half. 

Something on echolalia you may find interesting and it is what I observed with my 9-year-old.

Quote

It’s no secret that verbal repetition and imitation are important parts of early speech and language acquisition. Speech and language input create a framework for children to understand their environment, say first words, learn new vocabulary and exercise increasingly complex functions of communication. As children hear language around them, they begin to assign meaning, repeat words and eventually use language in novel ways to become independent communicators.

Echolalia, a form of verbal imitation, is one of the most common characteristics of communication in people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Although previously seen by some as maladaptive behavior, an increasing body of evidence led most experts to recognize echolalia as a bridge to meaningful, self-generated speech with communicative intent. As speech-language pathologists, we play a part in helping family members and fellow professionals understand the important role echolalia plays in language development and communication of people with ASD.

Here are seven important facts about echolalia for SLPs to know and share:

  1. Echolalia represents a gestalt language-processing style. This means children first assign a single unit of meaning to longer segments of spoken language. What a child initially perceives as “comesitdownatthetable” may simply mean “table” to them, for example. Gradually, the child can isolate smaller and smaller parts from the original phrase and use individual words and grammatical structures to produce original sentences. Children with autism essentially learn language from the top-down, rather than bottom-up.
  2. Echolalia can be immediate or delayed. Immediate echolalia occurs within two conversational turns of original language input, whereas delayed echolalia occurs after more than two conversational turns take place. When a child repeats learned routines or phrases that are more complex than they can formulate on their own, that usually signifies delayed echolalia. Though delayed echoic responses may not fit current conversational context to an unfamiliar listener, they often relate personally to the child. For example, a repeated sentence or phrase can represent a significant memory, emotion or area of interest.
  3. Echolalia is a verbal behavior, not a vocal stereotypy. People with ASD might echo their own speech, the speech of others and/or audio media from radio or television. Echolalia always involves repetition of verbalizations in some form—not vocalizations. SLPs can help distinguish true echolalia from non-speech vocalizations such as vocal stereotypy.
  4. Echolalia supports relationship-building and social closeness.In addition to supporting language acquisition including vocabulary and syntax development, echolalia creates opportunities for people with autism to interact and engage with others through conversational turn-taking. This verbal reciprocity supports relationship-building and social-emotional closeness with others.
  5. Echolalia serves a variety of communicative purposes.Echolalia provides a way for people with autism to affirm, call, request, label, protest, relate information, complete verbal routines and give directives. Nonverbal indicators of engagement and comprehension, such as eye gaze, body language and gestures are often observed in combination with echolalia.
  6. Echolalia aids self-regulation. Most experts say echolalia improves communication  even when a specific function of communication can’t be identified. Even when a child’s echoes seem out of context, for example, echolalia still supports important aspects of cognitive functioning including rehearsal, learning and self-regulation.
  7. SLPs can support language learning through interaction.Following a child’s lead by using low-constraint language models—like comments, affirmations and reflective questions—can support natural language development in children with ASD who demonstrate echolalia. This sets up a facilitative interaction style, which can yield more sophisticated communication with higher levels of comprehension—for example, requesting information or commenting.

By recognizing differences in language learning styles, defining echolalia, and embracing its social, communicative and cognitive functionalities, we can positively influence the way echolalia is perceived and treated. Widening our scope of treatment options helps increase language-learning opportunities for people with autism.

 

I have copy-pasted the entire article as it has valuable information for those that are not aware of it, and put what I wanted to point out in bold.

Here's the link from the ASHA blog:

https://blog.asha.org/2017/05/09/echoes-of-language-development-7-facts-about-echolalia-for-slps/

When ABA therapists were saying echolalia is something to prevent an ASD child from engaging in, I could see what my son was doing, and my husband and I used it to his advantage.

 

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ElizabethB, I bought Syllables Spell Success a while ago for the concentrated spelling rules and have found it to be a useful quick reference amongst the multitude of language reference books I have. That's yours isn't it ☺️ ? I didn't even know about it until I stumbled across it on Amazon locally.

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Quote

Sometimes referred to as Specific Comprehension Deficit or Hyperlexia

  • Inadequate reading comprehension
  • Adequate or advanced word recognition skills
  • Adequate reading fluency
  • May have social, cognitive, or linguistic deficits

Differentiate hyperlexia from precocious reading, the presence of advanced word recognition and advanced reading comprehension skills in typically developing children

 

From ASHA found here:

Disorders of Reading and Writing

https://www.asha.org/Practice-Portal/Clinical-Topics/Written-Language-Disorders/Disorders-of-Reading-and-Writing/

Same link on dyslexia:

Quote

Sometimes referred to as Dyslexia

Difficulty exists despite adequate instruction and absence of intellectual, sensory, or neurological difficulties

  • Difficulty with accurate and/or fluent word recognition difficulties with accurate and/or fluent word recognition
  • Poor spelling
  • Language comprehension relatively intact

 

Also, all this info does not take 2E individuals into account. Of course both my boys were reading before age four! It is very consistent with both my husband and me, we were both reading by age 4. I taught myself to read in two languages. I can assure you it was not Hyperlexia.

I am very pleased to see you will be working on comprehension skills though, PeterPan!

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19 hours ago, Moved On said:

ElizabethB, I bought Syllables Spell Success a while ago for the concentrated spelling rules and have found it to be a useful quick reference amongst the multitude of language reference books I have. That's yours isn't it ☺️ ? I didn't even know about it until I stumbled across it on Amazon locally.

Yes, that is mine!  I've collected the spelling rules over my years of tutoring and from my collection of spelling books.  I have over 20 spellers from the 1800's alone and a bunch of things from the early 1900's and a few current programs.

You can print just the rules from my syllables page, and the videos to teach the program are linked there.

https://www.thephonicspage.org/On Reading/syllablesspellsu.html

I have made a DVD of the movies that are on YouTube, the DVD will be available for sale on Amazon for $9.99, it is currently being reviewed by Createspace.

You can print all the files in the workbook for free, I made the workbook for people that would rather buy a book than print a bunch of pages.  I made the DVD so that people can use it to teach group classes.

I also used the actual study the ABCs and All Their Tricks was based on, I own the book form of Hanna study, it's over 1,000 pages.  It's scanned online now if you're interested, although it's pretty dry.  Here is a link to the study, the PDF has all 1721 pages.

https://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED128835

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35 minutes ago, ElizabethB said:

Yes, that is mine!  I've collected the spelling rules over my years of tutoring and from my collection of spelling books.  I have over 20 spellers from the 1800's alone and a bunch of things from the early 1900's and a few current programs.

You can print just the rules from my syllables page, and the videos to teach the program are linked there.

https://www.thephonicspage.org/On Reading/syllablesspellsu.html

I have made a DVD of the movies that are on YouTube, the DVD will be available for sale on Amazon for $9.99, it is currently being reviewed by Createspace.

You can print all the files in the workbook for free, I made the workbook for people that would rather buy a book than print a bunch of pages.  I made the DVD so that people can use it to teach group classes.

I also used the actual study the ABCs and All Their Tricks was based on, I own the book form of Hanna study, it's over 1,000 pages.  It's scanned online now if you're interested, although it's pretty dry.  Here is a link to the study, the PDF has all 1721 pages.

https://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED128835

 

I'm a geek so I will be downloading the study ?. Thank you! I own ABCs and All Their Tricks as well, and I'm happy I bought it when I did. I had seen it recommended by forum member Merry. Your compact book is extremely handy though. I will print the spelling rules. Great idea!

Thank you for always being willing to share and to help others ☺️!

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43 minutes ago, Moved On said:

 

I'm a geek so I will be downloading the study ?. Thank you! I own ABCs and All Their Tricks as well, and I'm happy I bought it when I did. I had seen it recommended by forum member Merry. Your compact book is extremely handy though. I will print the spelling rules. Great idea!

Thank you for always being willing to share and to help others ☺️!

You're welcome.  I analyzed the words in Hanna and have them in percentages here for both spelling and reading:

http://www.thephonicspage.org/Phonics Lsns/phonogramsoundch.html

Here is how big the study is, I have to keep it at floor level on my bookcase: 

 

HannaStudy.jpg

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33 minutes ago, ElizabethB said:

You're welcome.  I analyzed the words in Hanna and have them in percentages here for both spelling and reading:

http://www.thephonicspage.org/Phonics Lsns/phonogramsoundch.html

Here is how big the study is, I have to keep it at floor level on my bookcase: 

 

HannaStudy.jpg

 

? Yeah... I don't think I'll be printing it, LOL. That is much thicker than my History of Art text. And that has some pretty thick pages! And, also, thicker than an old copy of the Bible that I have, with dictionary and some thick full page pictures. Wow! Many kuddos to you!

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1 hour ago, Moved On said:

 

? Yeah... I don't think I'll be printing it, LOL. That is much thicker than my History of Art text. And that has some pretty thick pages! And, also, thicker than an old copy of the Bible that I have, with dictionary and some thick full page pictures. Wow! Many kuddos to you!

The first hundred or two hundred pages is the results of the study, the rest of the pages are the 17,000 words arranged in different ways.  

You might enjoy Hanna's book about spelling that he wrote after completing the study:

https://www.amazon.com/Spelling-strategies-Paul-Robert-Hanna/dp/0395045657/ref=sr_1_6?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1532896325&sr=1-6

ETA: Here is a quote from the book that I have on my sight word page:

3. Hanna, Paul R, Richard E. Hodges, and Jean S. Hanna, "Spelling: Structure and Strategies," 1971. p.44: " During the Middle English period, a certain type of angular writing was in vogue which resulted in some ambiguity for the reader when u was followed by an m, n, or u (sometimes written v or w.) Consequently, scribes replaced the u with o, and that spelling is retained in some words used today, e.g. come, monk, love, tongue, some, honey, son.

_clear.gif_clear.gif

And, he talks about teaching spelling as a puzzle, I made my spelling sounds of K video based on that:

 

 

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10 minutes ago, ElizabethB said:

The first hundred or two hundred pages is the results of the study, the rest of the pages are the 17,000 words arranged in different ways.  

You might enjoy Hanna's book about spelling that he wrote after completing the study:

https://www.amazon.com/Spelling-strategies-Paul-Robert-Hanna/dp/0395045657/ref=sr_1_6?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1532896325&sr=1-6

ETA: Here is a quote from the book that I have on my sight word page:

3. Hanna, Paul R, Richard E. Hodges, and Jean S. Hanna, "Spelling: Structure and Strategies," 1971. p.44: " During the Middle English period, a certain type of angular writing was in vogue which resulted in some ambiguity for the reader when u was followed by an m, n, or u (sometimes written v or w.) Consequently, scribes replaced the u with o, and that spelling is retained in some words used today, e.g. come, monk, love, tongue, some, honey, son.

_clear.gif_clear.gif

And, he talks about teaching spelling as a puzzle, I made my spelling sounds of K video based on that:

 

 

Thank you, Elizabeth! I looked for the book through our local Amazon but there are no copies currently on sale. I'm adding it to my list though. That is intriguing!

My sons have both been natural spellers, which is why the lists are so useful to me. I just add it as reinforcement so that they know why a word is spelled as it is. My husband was schooled with the English phonetic system and my first language was taught with phonics. At around age 4 I took the grade one book (per my parents) asked them the sounds, and taught myself to read. I taught myself French in a similar manner, TV shows like Sesame Street and my grandmother who spoke 5 languages. My youngest has that gift also, and he wants to learn another language, but I am still concerned due to the expressive language issues he had. Can't hold him back forever! 

Anyway, I use the rules with my youngest now during reading and writing. We are also using Jolly Grammar, which puts a lot of focus on spelling. I try to tackle things from different angles based on their needs and level they are at.

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Elizabeth, I was thinking of typing some of the spelling rules using your book and the ABCs book, making index cards, and creating some sort of game for my 9-year-old. I am thinking of combining it with Scrabble (I was looking at your scrabble page). I know he knows the most obvious rules, and he has excellent syllabication skills (another thing that came naturally to him), from very young. I just want him to also know the rules as rules, so I am thinking of getting him to match the spelling rules to the words after he spells the word playing scrabble with me. Thoughts?

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1 hour ago, Moved On said:

Elizabeth, I was thinking of typing some of the spelling rules using your book and the ABCs book, making index cards, and creating some sort of game for my 9-year-old. I am thinking of combining it with Scrabble (I was looking at your scrabble page). I know he knows the most obvious rules, and he has excellent syllabication skills (another thing that came naturally to him), from very young. I just want him to also know the rules as rules, so I am thinking of getting him to match the spelling rules to the words after he spells the word playing scrabble with me. Thoughts?

That sounds fun.  You don't have to memorize most of them, just know and understand them.  There is a spelling notebook set up so you arrange words by spelling rule and pattern, that could work, too, you could make your own if it's only available in the U.S. 

https://www.amazon.com/Tricks-Trade-Gayle-Graham/dp/1880892243/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1533077210&sr=8-3&keywords=tricks+of+the+trade

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17 hours ago, ElizabethB said:

That sounds fun.  You don't have to memorize most of them, just know and understand them.  There is a spelling notebook set up so you arrange words by spelling rule and pattern, that could work, too, you could make your own if it's only available in the U.S. 

https://www.amazon.com/Tricks-Trade-Gayle-Graham/dp/1880892243/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1533077210&sr=8-3&keywords=tricks+of+the+trade

Ha! Sellers here kill me! $50 CAD (approx. $38.40 USD) for a new copy. And that's the lowest LOL.

He does know and understand the basic ones. I have WRTR (two editions) and the Spalding Phonogram cards. The Jolly Grammar Handbooks present them that way, also. I just want him to be tapping into specific spelling and grammar rules as he is writing. He is starting 4th grade in the fall. I am trying to up his level of writing more complex sentences and comprehending more complex language in text. He eye reads a lot and often writes sentences with expression above his grade. I just want to make sure he fully understands the mechanics of writing. It seems to be a fascination of his; narrating like David Attenborough and writing his own text for his own science videos. It's hard when you have kids that intuitively pick up things! You don't know where there might be a gap in understanding. So I am doing what most people try to do when they teach their kids, only in reverse. If that makes sense! He has the knowledge and I am making sure he knows what that knowledge is based on.

I was trying to come up with a game, so that it's not always worksheets. I'll see how we will do this! 

ETA: Thank you for the suggestion.

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On 7/31/2018 at 5:04 PM, Moved On said:

I was trying to come up with a game, so that it's not always worksheets. I'll see how we will do this! 

 I am here with my resources around me and ...

Ooops, wasn't supposed to post yet LOL!

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31 minutes ago, Moved On said:

 I am here with my resources around me and ...

Ooops, wasn't supposed to post yet LOL!

 

Let's try this again! I was thinking about this some more. I am sitting here, resources around me, and realizing I don't want to suck the fun out of a game of scrabble LOL. Soooo... I decided to use our vocabulary study. His vocabulary from reading, science, etc. will most likely be too easy. He wants to work on Fulbright's Zoology 3 book next year but I am getting him the Notebooking Journal for that and there's tons to do in the notebooks.  I am thinking of using Yesterday's Classics instead, and combining it with literature study. I will pre-select vocabulary words and use them as dictation before he gets to work on the words or see the spelling. Then, based on how he does, we will pull up the rules together directly from the books (ABCs, etc.), so he can see where he stumbled, work on word meanings in his vocabulary notebook, and at the end of the week we will do dictation again. I think I like this idea better!

Anyway... rambling. Taking off for my forum break; long overdue!

All the best,

M

Edited by Guest

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So back to the Pom pom video:

I'm in the process of making these pom poms for my dd7 with dyslexia (and I'm really only going through all this work instead of using blocks since I figure I'll get to use them for dd5 and dd3 eventually as well), and am having a hard time finding all the information I want. In particular, she has these cool split balls (ch = t + sh, for example, and or + ee = oy), and I'm wondering if there is a resource out there that would list these combinations for me. I didn't see something like this in LiPS (just their wheel of vowels), and am not sure where else to look since I'm definitely not an SLP and don't know these things already. ?

ETA and some of them, I flat out don't get and wonder if it's an Australian accent thing (like e + shwa = air???).
I'm wondering if it's in the materials at http://marooneyfoundation.org/professional-learning.aspx  but I paused reading it to go through LiPS instead.

Edited by 4KookieKids

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Just in case anyone else cares about the answer to my question above (and doesn't already know it! lol), the information is all here:

https://www.macquariedictionary.com.au/resources/help/23/

Though some of it seems a bit funky. For example, they say that oy = or + i, not or + ee, but when you listen to the sound bit for i as in pit, they definitely pronounce it as peet... 

Edited by 4KookieKids

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Kookie, If the dc has significant articulation issues, an SLP should be hitting it anyway. Yes some vowels are dipthongs and taught in speech therapy as a sequence of sounds. Yes, we use a knowledge of linguistics to build sounds depending on where the tongue is, what the sequence of movements is, etc. But in general, unless the dc has significant articulation issues, that seems pretty in the weeds. I mean, nuts, my ds has severe apraxia and we never bothered with all that.

Edited by PeterPan
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On 10/15/2018 at 1:48 AM, 4KookieKids said:

ETA and some of them, I flat out don't get and wonder if it's an Australian accent thing (like e + shwa = air???).

 

"Air" is more like a glottal stop + e + schwa

3 hours ago, 4KookieKids said:

Though some of it seems a bit funky. For example, they say that oy = or + i, not or + ee, but when you listen to the sound bit for i as in pit, they definitely pronounce it as peet... 

 

It's a hellava broad Australian accent if pit and peat are pronounced the same.

(Not that this matters at all. I'm just feeling chatty, suddenly.)

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9 hours ago, PeterPan said:

Kookie, If the dc has significant articulation issues, an SLP should be hitting it anyway. Yes some vowels are dipthongs and taught in speech therapy as a sequence of sounds. Yes, we use a knowledge of linguistics to build sounds depending on where the tongue is, what the sequence of movements is, etc. But in general, unless the dc has significant articulation issues, that seems pretty in the weeds. I mean, nuts, my ds has severe apraxia and we never bothered with all that.

 

She doesn't have articulation issues. But I was making these pom-poms, and just wanted to color them correctly. And she really enjoys figuring out how her body feels for various sounds. We just did the classification of brother consonants in LiPS, and I intended to just start with two pairs, but she loved it so much that she did all brother pairs in a single day. It was really funny watching her feel her mouth and nose and throat and ears and tongue and all of that as she worked on it. ? 

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