Jump to content

Menu

wiggle seats/wobble cushions


Recommended Posts

I borrowed it from a friend who wasn't using theirs much.  I soon found out why .... Not only do they serve as wobble cushions, but they are also discuses.  and spot markers for the floor. and targets for shooting practice.  and ........

It would be different if they were actually attached to the seat and couldn't be removed.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We got one through Amazon for about $25.  It didn't help the child we bought it for - she used to stand and rock the chair, rather than sit in it. We passed it on to a friend, and it didn't work for her kiddo and she passed it on to another family.  I'm not sure if it ever found a permanent home...lol  I think the bouncy ball chair would have worked better here...but it was a phase that kiddo grew out of, so we never did try it. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do you have carpet? The wobble cushion was affecting the finish on the chair I had it on, literally taking off the black paint. You'd be really upset if it affected the finish on your hardwood. 

Here's a video I was watching recently with flex seating ideas. 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don’t think so.  I think they are more used to keep kids sitting in one place on the floor, than to be a comfortable place to sit and work.  I think they are more for circle time with kids sitting on the floor.  

They are in the same category as carpet squares, rugs with squares printed on them, or putting masking tape on the floor.  They are about having kids sit in their own space and stay in their space.  

I think that is the kind of use where they shine.  

I think there are other options for sitting and working.  

But at the same time — if you like them and think your kids would like them, that’s the main thing.  

But keep in mind at school they like plasticy stuff because it can be cleaned.  At home you can use pillows and things that are not as good of options at a school.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They weren’t good for us to help with extended sitting.  We use a big bouncy “peanut” for active listening for active kids who need to move.  Like an exercise ball but peanut shell shaped.  The peanut isn’t good for writing activities, though.  Sometimes swivel chairs are ok for writing and sometimes not.  It depends on the child and the adult’s goal if a wobble seat would be useful.  I wouldn’t advise those seats for most neuro typical kids.  Usually sensory kids, ADHD, or others with higher physical needs than most may benefit.  Or they might not benefit either.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have one for twin 1. HE flaps his arms a lot. If he sits on the wobble cushion then his arm flapping stops instantly. it is amazing how it works - unfortunately he doesn't like sitting on it. it makes him feel sad. So what we do is save it for when he is trying to do something important that needs him to not flap his arms and he is happy to use it just for that short time.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My son actually sat in a little rocking chair in pre-school for the same kind of goal.  It worked great for him.

But — how many pre-schools can fit in a regular classroom?

And then second, a big issue gets to be that if some things are only used by certain kids, their use can be stigmatizing, and can hurt kids socially, and then some parents will say they don’t want it used because they don’t want their kids to look different and be treated differently because of the use.  (Especially as kids get older.)  

So for a classroom — smaller is better, easily-cleaned is better, and things that can be used (to some extent) with all kids, in a positive way, are better.  

So there are a lot of options that are great options, but aren’t great options for a regular classroom.  

My older son had a class once where half the chairs were yoga ball chairs, and half were plain chairs.  I thought that worked well because kids who didn’t like them didn’t have to sit in them, but, if half the kids sit in them there is no stigma.  And, also, a lot more kids benefit than would obviously possibly need them.  

But they are bulky and I can see why the teacher in the blog who looks like she has a center-based classroom in a lot of ways would like discs and stools better than an upper-elementary teacher who would not have as much movement around the classroom and more time sitting-in-chairs-working.  Also slightly older students can move their desks/tables and chairs around easily, so the teacher can easily change the classroom to group work or something.  

For younger kids they aren’t as able to do that with bulky items, so small items the kids can manage themselves, are better, and would be easier for the teacher too if she rearranged by herself.  

There are items that are used in resource rooms or therapy rooms that are impractical for regular classrooms, and if you look on sensory websites there is a ton of stuff out there.  Which — is always fairly hit or miss unless you can try it somewhere before buying.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd maybe try to go to a school supply store with your kids and let them try some of these things out or maybe find someone to borrow from before you invest in them.  Plain ol' pillows on the floor might work better for kids working at a coffee table, unless you have neurodivergent kiddos with atypical sensory or movement needs.  However things are, each kid will probably have his own preferences for seating.

All four of my boys have SPD and/or ADHD and/or are on the spectrum.  The round inflated cushion thing didn't work for and was disliked by all of them.  Two of my boys can't sit on our wobble chair for long without falling off, one doesn't like it, and one *loves* it.  My older boy who has coordination issues/postural disorder/dysgraphia likes a regular chair with bouncy bands on the legs for kicking.  One likes to sit and rock in a soft framed stadium seat.  My sensory under-responder does best on a chair fitted with an inflatable wedge and a foot rest.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Cake and Pi said:

One likes to sit and rock in a soft framed stadium seat. 

Are you putting the stadium seat on the floor or on a chair with a back? I had been looking at a chair like this at Lakeshore Learning ($60?) and a knockoff on amazon (thinner foam, better price), but I wasn't sure. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, PeterPan said:

Are you putting the stadium seat on the floor or on a chair with a back? I had been looking at a chair like this at Lakeshore Learning ($60?) and a knockoff on amazon (thinner foam, better price), but I wasn't sure. 

 At home he uses it on the floor and works off a clipboard.  However, this is my rising 4th grade PSer, and his teacher last year said he often used it in a school chair without any issues.  I have a hard time imagining it in a chair the way he rocks in it at home, but he must do something different at school.  He also used an exercise ball seat at school, until he popped it, lol

We have an older version of this seat: https://www.rei.com/product/136449/rei-co-op-trail-chair
The school provided one for him to use in his classroom which was different but very similar.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Cake and Pi said:

We have an older version of this seat: https://www.rei.com/product/136449/rei-co-op-trail-chair
The school provided one for him to use in his classroom which was different but very similar.

What I'm noticing about this is it's kind of snuggly with the sides. It might be he (my ds) would actually prefer it over the more expensive, very open Lakeshore Learning version, hmm. I'm going to show him. And I love that your school is working with you to make these things happen! Score!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I still think the best seating hack I've seen is just wrapping those exercise bands around the feet of your chairs. Boing, boing, boing go the feet. Everything else looks normal.

I think it's always a balance between the need to wiggle and the way that the wiggly stuff can be a distraction. YMMV on literally everything.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...