Jump to content

Menu

Not sure where to move. Sell me on your state.


Slache
 Share

Recommended Posts

9 hours ago, Slache said:

San Antonio, Texas. Great HS laws, low COL, and it's Texas. Beaches! Hot though. Very hot. Cheap flights to the in laws.

No, not there. More expensive than Austin, much, much more humidity; we have Lake Travis (beaches)and an airport. :-)

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Mergath said:

Ah. Yeah, we aren't exactly a global beacon for diverse communities outside of the bigger cities. Especially as you get further north into the smaller, more cut off areas that might have something like a one percent non-white population, there tends to be more racism, though in my experience it's more often ignorance and fear than outright hostility. (I grew up on the northern border, so I'm pretty familiar with things up there.) Though Duluth, where I went to college, was much more diverse. It's one of the reasons I was so sad to leave, though the economy back in '08 didn't really give me a choice.

The person you met is pretty extreme, though. I'm glad things turned out well.

She seemed like she was from a podunk little town. It's just my main picture of Minnesota so I thought your post was funny. It sounds like you're getting new neighbors though. ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Minnesota definitely doesn't fit the specs.  My family is from Minnesota, although only my aunt is left.  I've always been shocked at the value of her house.   Then you add the other expenses of extra clothes, storm windows, snow tires, shoveling snow, income taxes ...   Then there is the city known as Moscow On the Mississippi (Minneapolis), with the entire state very liberal.  

eta: there was one advantage of early childhood in a non-diverse community.   (Not saying I'd recommend it, just that not everyone from one grows up to a knuckle-dragging racist.)   I was second or third grade before I heard of the concept of prejudice.   I have a distinct memory of asking my dad what it meant.  I remember being a bit shocked, then running through my memory to see if anyone I knew was one.   There was only one, my grandmother, the evil one.  At least for me, I think it was a benefit to not hit the idea until I was old enough to reject it.  The town I grew up in was fairly poor, so it wasn't that it didn't allow non-white people, it is just that it wasn't any better than where non-white people were already living.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, Ellie said:

Texas.

Specifically, central Texas. Because me. ? Also, it really is central: you can be at the beach in a few hours, but you don't have to put up with hurricanes and humidity; you can drive over to Houston, or up to DFW, in a few hours. Low cost of living, awesome homeschool community and laws (no accountability to anyone, ever). And we're in Hill Country, which is not as beautiful as my Virginia but is still quite lovely. ?

I cannot answer anything about immunization requirements, though.

I was going to say north Texas.  We are about to move, but we have been here for 6 years and we have learned to love it. 

The intense summer heat would be an adjustment. And it’s also not as beautiful as Oregon. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Slache said:

Yes, the kids are on state insurance. Definitely something to consider. I'll look for COL calculators. Thanks.

Yes, definitely considering how taxes factor in.

 

I would put the access to health care / state insurance at (or near) the very top of the list, before you start deciding on other factors. States have a lot of control over who gets access to those benefits, and while all may technically have insurance programs, they can have so many hoops to jump through & requirements to meet that you won't be able to qualify, so you should research not just what types of programs are available, but what the requirements are to qualify for them. For example, someone who lives in ID told me that the state has basically a 2-year waiting period of residency before new residents are able to effectively qualify for state assistance (note: that was ~3 years ago & I have never verified that info, or if it is true, I have no idea if it is for any type of state assistance or certain types only). The point being, health care access for your children is the last thing you want to be surprised by when you move.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

25 minutes ago, Arctic Mama said:

They’re pretty terrible for special needs too, according to my online friends in our groups.

Yes, I have relatives who have moved away from there because of it and one of the families I know from the Autism center moved there...and moved back the next year.  They are very well off and it wasn’t a question of state insurance, it was a question of the availability of providers and the special education programs.  

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you are on state insurance, then you don't want Texas. The conservative government in Texas has been cutting back expansively on anything that can be considered a social service as much as they think they can get away with (and they can get away with a lot) so they can give that money to businesses.

Special education in Texas is under fire because TEA (Texas Education Agency) set a maximum percentage of students identified as SpEd in districts and schools that were higher than that got in trouble. https://www.texastribune.org/2018/01/14/school-groups-special-education-texas-legislators/ 

 

 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, Happy2BaMom said:

 

I would put the access to health care / state insurance at (or near) the very top of the list, before you start deciding on other factors. States have a lot of control over who gets access to those benefits, and while all may technically have insurance programs, they can have so many hoops to jump through & requirements to meet that you won't be able to qualify, so you should research not just what types of programs are available, but what the requirements are to qualify for them. For example, someone who lives in ID told me that the state has basically a 2-year waiting period of residency before new residents are able to effectively qualify for state assistance (note: that was ~3 years ago & I have never verified that info, or if it is true, I have no idea if it is for any type of state assistance or certain types only). The point being, health care access for your children is the last thing you want to be surprised by when you move.

 

The main limit placed by some states is income.  You have to be much poorer in some states to get SCHIP funding.  

Labor market/income potential + considerations of having special needs kids were very high on our list when searching.  We have had so-called "Cadillac" employer insurance but with their health needs, living in states with a high limit for SCHIP as secondary insurance and waivers carries a very real value.  

A rural or small town area in a swing or blue state might be better than a very red state in terms of SCHIP access for working-class families.  I might put Ohio back on the list (sorry!)

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, AngieW in Texas said:

If you are on state insurance, then you don't want Texas. The conservative government in Texas has been cutting back expansively on anything that can be considered a social service as much as they think they can get away with (and they can get away with a lot) so they can give that money to businesses.

Special education in Texas is under fire because TEA (Texas Education Agency) set a maximum percentage of students identified as SpEd in districts and schools that were higher than that got in trouble. https://www.texastribune.org/2018/01/14/school-groups-special-education-texas-legislators/ 

 

 

We have been living in north Texas with our kids using CHIP for the past 6 years. It hasn’t been amazing but it has been do-able. I do think that with current politics CHIP is at risk. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Florida....

no state income tax.... low property taxes (negative is homeowner's insurance/flood insurance)

very easy homeschooling.... either portfolio review, umbrella school (usually just track attendance), or standardized test given by a teacher (many homeschool groups host these)

a lot of Florida is very conservative....we have Republican Governor, state Senate, and state House  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Alicia64 said:

I haven't read all of the responses, but I grew up in CA (don't recommend), lived in VA for five years (LOVED), and have been in GA for last three years (it's okay).

Good thing to know: several states have no state income tax. I knew one super rich guy who moved out of CA to FL because FL has no state income tax. And I know of a relatively wealthy lady who left CA for Texas because it doesn't have state income tax. I know that South Dakota and Alaska don't have state income tax either.

All told, "Florida, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Washington and Wyoming. And residents of New Hampshire and Tennessee are also spared from handing over an extra chunk of their paycheck on April 15, though they do pay tax on dividends and income from investments."

I have a good friend who moved out of CA and settled in TN specifically because of state income tax.

I highly recommend Richmond, VA -- close to DC, Mount Vernon, Monticello and Williamsburg. History EVERYWHERE. Two hours to a beautiful beach. Four gorgeous seasons (well, summer is hot but you just stay in a/c or get into a pool). The fall and spring are stunners. Sometimes you get a little snow in the winter, some years no.

If you want more info on GA or VA, just PM me!

Alley

The benefits of no income tax are generally much greater for wealthier individuals than those making minimum wage. While some of the no income tax states are towards the low end of overall tax burden, several others are closer to the middle. 

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, LucyStoner said:

A rural or small town area in a swing or blue state might be better than a very red state in terms of SCHIP access for working-class families.  I might put Ohio back on the list (sorry!)

 

Or just move to a more rural area in Oregon. Besides access to healthcare, you might also check what minimum wage is in different states. I believe Oregon's is higher than in many places, but I know COL factors into that. I think it's higher in the Portland area than the rest of the state too. But Beaverton or any Portland suburban would have very high housing costs. East of the Cascades will be more conservative, as will smaller towns. Perhaps Medford area? They're known to be less vaccinated too.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, Frances said:

The benefits of no income tax are generally much greater for wealthier individuals than those making minimum wage. While some of the no income tax states are towards the low end of overall tax burden, several others are closer to the middle. 

I was about to mention this. Generally, if a state has no income tax, but high sales tax, the tax system borders on regressive, which is not what you’re looking for if you’re low income. 

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

35 minutes ago, Ali in OR said:

 

Or just move to a more rural area in Oregon. Besides access to healthcare, you might also check what minimum wage is in different states. I believe Oregon's is higher than in many places, but I know COL factors into that. I think it's higher in the Portland area than the rest of the state too. But Beaverton or any Portland suburban would have very high housing costs. East of the Cascades will be more conservative, as will smaller towns. Perhaps Medford area? They're known to be less vaccinated too.

 

I was going to suggest Eastern OR or Eastern WA but neither seemed like it would fit the "close to Cincinnati" requirement.   You basically have to fly unless you have many extra days to devote to driving and there aren't super cheap airfares usually.  Washington also has a regressive tax system that is not great for working-class families.  Oregon has no sales tax but a pretty high and flat rather than progressive income tax.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 hours ago, Ellie said:

Texas.

Specifically, central Texas. Because me. ? Also, it really is central: you can be at the beach in a few hours, but you don't have to put up with hurricanes and humidity; you can drive over to Houston, or up to DFW, in a few hours. Low cost of living, awesome homeschool community and laws (no accountability to anyone, ever). And we're in Hill Country, which is not as beautiful as my Virginia but is still quite lovely. ?

I cannot answer anything about immunization requirements, though.

You’re not wrong; but on the other hand, the day you posted this it was 110 degrees in Central Texas. ?

  • Haha 2
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, LucyStoner said:

 

I was going to suggest Eastern OR or Eastern WA but neither seemed like it would fit the "close to Cincinnati" requirement.   You basically have to fly unless you have many extra days to devote to driving and there aren't super cheap airfares usually.  Washington also has a regressive tax system that is not great for working-class families.  Oregon has no sales tax but a pretty high and flat rather than progressive income tax.  

While the rates are high, Oregon’s income tax system is still relatively progressive due to credits, especially for working families, and the elimination and/or phase-out of many tax savings for wealthier individuals. It’s definitely at least in the top 20 for progressivity and likely the top 15.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is a handy calculator. 

One thing to remember is that while the tax cuts (federally) have lower marginal rates, because of the elimination of exemptions and other factors (even with the increase in the std. deduction), EFFECTIVE tax rates for most married working-class and middle-class families will be higher, especially those with more than 1 or 2 children.  

If you scroll down, it breaks out estimated total taxes by type (state, local, federal) for the income and other figures you enter.  

https://smartasset.com/taxes/income-taxes

Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 minutes ago, LucyStoner said:

This is a handy calculator. 

One thing to remember is that while the tax cuts (federally) have lower marginal rates, because of the elimination of exemptions and other factors (even with the increase in the std. deduction), EFFECTIVE tax rates for most married working-class and middle-class families will be higher, especially those with more than 1 or 2 children.  

If you scroll down, it breaks out estimated total taxes by type (state, local, federal) for the income and other figures you enter.  

https://smartasset.com/taxes/income-taxes

I didn't want to be responsible and do things. I wanted the hive to tell me what to do.

  • Like 4
  • Haha 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, LucyStoner said:

This is a handy calculator. 

One thing to remember is that while the tax cuts (federally) have lower marginal rates, because of the elimination of exemptions and other factors (even with the increase in the std. deduction), EFFECTIVE tax rates for most married working-class and middle-class families will be higher, especially those with more than 1 or 2 children.  

If you scroll down, it breaks out estimated total taxes by type (state, local, federal) for the income and other figures you enter.  

https://smartasset.com/taxes/income-taxes

Thanks. ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Slache, Oregon has no sales tax which will be an extremely important consideration for you if you live on minimum wage. Texas' varies by county but almost all the populous areas are 8.25%. That would be a very painful adjustment coming from a no sales tax state.

In general, you'll need to do your due diligence looking at how low income earners manage to live in states. For you, children's health insurance will be vital and you should be much more concerned about sales tax instead of income tax. You should also look at worker's comp, unemployment and state college tuition programs for low income students. Since you won't be able to build enough savings to get you through a serious rough patch you need to be sure the social safety net is adequate.

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, Slache said:

I didn't want to be responsible and do things. I wanted the hive to tell me what to do.

Living on the wild side.  I like it.  

I am an over-planner and went all accountant-like with spreadsheets for a move we didn't actually end up making, lol.  To be fair, since I am an accountant, going all accountant-like wasn't entirely unforeseen.  We were looking for a reasonable cost of living, decent healthcare IT job market, proximity to universities, NOT HOT AS HADES and politically mixed or leaning blue metro area, if not state.  

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

44 minutes ago, Arctic Mama said:

Well that’s a potentially expensive and dodgy life plan.

 

Thanks to that impulse I have an instant pot, Treasured Conversations, a Sia album I was convinced I’d hate, slightly bitter feelings about the gallon of milk in my fridge, and over abundance of love for Benedict Cumberbatch, all of KT’s books, a course on tapping, several boxes of both Hello Fresh AND Stitchfix, a wood wick beeswax candle, and am giving all my tote bags AND shopping bags a once over as potential purse candidates.

I only have an instant pot and I got it on Prime Day! I win!

30 minutes ago, LucyStoner said:

Living on the wild side.  I like it.  

I am an over-planner and went all accountant-like with spreadsheets for a move we didn't actually end up making, lol.  To be fair, since I am an accountant, going all accountant-like wasn't entirely unforeseen.  We were looking for a reasonable cost of living, decent healthcare IT job market, proximity to universities, NOT HOT AS HADES and politically mixed or leaning blue metro area, if not state.  

I have a spreadsheet, but I'm sure not as pretty as yours. The Hades thing. Yeah. Hot. Very hot.

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, Slache said:

I only have an instant pot and I got it on Prime Day! I win!

I have a spreadsheet, but I'm sure not as pretty as yours. The Hades thing. Yeah. Hot. Very hot.

 

Most of the South and SW was out for us on heat alone.  I'd rather freeze than melt.  Actually, I'd rather just stay put with my not-too-hot not-too-cold PNW weather but Seattle housing (and by "Seattle" I mean anything from north of Everett to just south of Tacoma) is out of control crazy.  We are choosing education and other factors over being able to buy a house again at this point.  We are still open to moving, but no sooner than when our older son finishes high school.  My husband's new employer has offices all over the country so a transfer is possible (and may be necessary for career advancement).  

ETA:  Another consideration for us at this point is that my earning potential is heavily wrapped up in my connections here and knowledge of the local non-profit landscape.  With me going from working very part time to more like 1/2-3/4 time, that may mean we end up best off staying here.  Time will tell.  

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Arctic Mama said:

Well that’s a potentially expensive and dodgy life plan.

 

Thanks to that impulse I have an instant pot, Treasured Conversations, a Sia album I was convinced I’d hate, slightly bitter feelings about the gallon of milk in my fridge, and over abundance of love for Benedict Cumberbatch, all of KT’s books, a course on tapping, several boxes of both Hello Fresh AND Stitchfix, a wood wick beeswax candle, and am giving all my tote bags AND shopping bags a once over as potential purse candidates.

 

 

OMG, you win!!! 

Thanks for making my morning. Better than coffee...

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, LucyStoner said:

Living on the wild side.  I like it.  

I am an over-planner and went all accountant-like with spreadsheets for a move we didn't actually end up making, lol.  To be fair, since I am an accountant, going all accountant-like wasn't entirely unforeseen.  We were looking for a reasonable cost of living, decent healthcare IT job market, proximity to universities, NOT HOT AS HADES and politically mixed or leaning blue metro area, if not state.  

Seriously - your list sounds like central Maryland, except maybe cost of living; you gotta move away from the cities before housing prices don’t induce a stroke. BUT! If it does induce a stroke, we are so close to top-notch medical care! Healthcare and IT job markets are robust here and we have several excellent universities. 

About the hot-as-hades thing: this, along with colder-than-the-heart-of-Elsa are two weather aspects that eliminate large swaths of the country for me whenever I start thinking of what state I would live in besides here. When we have heat here, it virtually always comes with intense humidity. It makes being outdoors legitimately awful to me. I don’t even understand 110*F. I have been to FL in August once and the main thing I remember was the unbearable heat and constant thunderstorms. I also don’t think there’s any hiking there because there’s no such thing as a hill. 

But then freezing cold is a problem too! You MN reps or ME or VT...how do you survive the winter?! How much does your heating costs come to? I already cannot survive without fuzzy socks, lambskin mocossins, a down comforter and double layers every winter day. 

I think I must be more weather-sensitive than the average person.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

53 minutes ago, Quill said:

"But then freezing cold is a problem too! You MN reps or ME or VT...how do you survive the winter?! How much does your heating costs come to? I already cannot survive without fuzzy socks, lambskin mocossins, a down comforter and double layers every winter day. "

We embrace the cold. :)

Right now the highs are in the 70's, which is normal for summer. Other than being unusually humid atm, that's pretty perfect to me, especially when we get cooler days mixed in. 

Cold is easier to handle for me. Plus it means skiing and snowshoeing, getting cozy by the stove, and it's soooo beautiful. I loved living in MN except for the summers (oh that heat and humidity!). I guess warm socks, down comforters and double layers are something I actually enjoy--what I do not enjoy are shorts and stickiness and having only a light blanket on the bed. And although have high heating bills (our highest ever might have been around $250 for a month? but that's unusually high), there is zero A/C so I suppose it balances out.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/24/2018 at 12:14 AM, Ellie said:

Texas.

Specifically, central Texas. Because me. ? Also, it really is central: you can be at the beach in a few hours, but you don't have to put up with hurricanes and humidity; you can drive over to Houston, or up to DFW, in a few hours. Low cost of living, awesome homeschool community and laws (no accountability to anyone, ever). And we're in Hill Country, which is not as beautiful as my Virginia but is still quite lovely. ?

I cannot answer anything about immunization requirements, though.

 

My friends moved from AR to SC to NC and then now in TX.  They said TX is by far the most expensive of the 4.  The property taxes are very high.  The homes are about double of Columbia, SC, and their utilities, gas, and groceries are much higher as well.

They like it overall, but their 1800 sq. ft house in TX was $325K (30 min. from Dallas) , their 1800 sq. ft. house in NC was $180K (about 30 min from Charlotte) and their 1800 sq. ft. house in SC was $150K (30 min. from Columbia.)  I don't know what their AR house was.

Property taxes......I think TX is about 2% of the value.  NC, 1%, SC .08%.  Of course this all varies by county, etc....

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, Alicia64 said:

I haven't read all of the responses, but I grew up in CA (don't recommend), lived in VA for five years (LOVED), and have been in GA for last three years (it's okay).

Good thing to know: several states have no state income tax. I knew one super rich guy who moved out of CA to FL because FL has no state income tax. And I know of a relatively wealthy lady who left CA for Texas because it doesn't have state income tax. I know that South Dakota and Alaska don't have state income tax either.

All told, "Florida, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Washington and Wyoming. And residents of New Hampshire and Tennessee are also spared from handing over an extra chunk of their paycheck on April 15, though they do pay tax on dividends and income from investments."

I have a good friend who moved out of CA and settled in TN specifically because of state income tax.

I highly recommend Richmond, VA -- close to DC, Mount Vernon, Monticello and Williamsburg. History EVERYWHERE. Two hours to a beautiful beach. Four gorgeous seasons (well, summer is hot but you just stay in a/c or get into a pool). The fall and spring are stunners. Sometimes you get a little snow in the winter, some years no.

If you want more info on GA or VA, just PM me!

Alley

 

Those states without income tax.....they get their money.  They just get it in other ways.  Property tax is high in TX.  

https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=https://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/casselman-datalab-statetaxes.png&imgrefurl=https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/where-your-state-gets-its-money/&h=1974&w=1220&tbnid=WmQ7KUpjE-U5yM:&q=how+does+oregon+make+money&tbnh=160&tbnw=98&usg=__Og0fX4wUdzSldgLRvI9gCTCSbYo%3D&vet=10ahUKEwiFrOOCk7rcAhVLtlMKHT0jDGoQ9QEILTAA..i&docid=QRM9RiBuNi9rFM&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiFrOOCk7rcAhVLtlMKHT0jDGoQ9QEILTAA

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just saw this thread.

Alabama, specifically northern AL like Huntsville-   not very hot == cooler than DC area on average in summer, warmer in winter.

Great children's state health insurance from what I gather= over 53% of children in the state have the insurance

Religious or medical exemption to immunizations

Low cost of living

Conservative state-  considered one of the most conservative states

6 hours to Cincinnati but a direct path driving.

One strong consideration for where ever you go should also depend on the health of family members.  A long time ago I hoped we would be able to retire here (from the military) and part of the big reason was I checked all the locations dh said he thought he could get a job and the air quality there.  One of the areas was Knoxville but when I looked at how many air quality alerts were there, I knew it wouldn't be a good place.  (As an aside, we were very fortunate and expectedly so  that we got stationed here before he retired).

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you like the South, I would move to the South.  It is less $$.  The midwest might be less $$ overall, but I am not partial to the midwest.  

Why don't you come down and drive around a bit and check it out.  

Look at the coastal areas of NC and SC.  You might really like it.  Look at Raleigh, NC and Greenville, SC.  Both are very nice areas.  Not sure if you would like an area like Nashville, TN as it is a bit further to the beach, but it is nice too.  

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

https://livability.com/va/blacksburg/real-estate/why-blacksburg-va-is-a-best-place-to-live

Returning to say that Blacksburg is just under a 6 hour drive to Cincinnati and about 5 hours to Virginia Beach (add one more hour give or take to Outer Banks NC). Christiansburg, it’s twin city, is a little less expensive to buy a home in and still be easy to work in Blacksburg. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Quill said:

Seriously - your list sounds like central Maryland, except maybe cost of living; you gotta move away from the cities before housing prices don’t induce a stroke. BUT! If it does induce a stroke, we are so close to top-notch medical care! Healthcare and IT job markets are robust here and we have several excellent universities. 

About the hot-as-hades thing: this, along with colder-than-the-heart-of-Elsa are two weather aspects that eliminate large swaths of the country for me whenever I start thinking of what state I would live in besides here. When we have heat here, it virtually always comes with intense humidity. It makes being outdoors legitimately awful to me. I don’t even understand 110*F. I have been to FL in August once and the main thing I remember was the unbearable heat and constant thunderstorms. I also don’t think there’s any hiking there because there’s no such thing as a hill. 

But then freezing cold is a problem too! You MN reps or ME or VT...how do you survive the winter?! How much does your heating costs come to? I already cannot survive without fuzzy socks, lambskin mocossins, a down comforter and double layers every winter day. 

I think I must be more weather-sensitive than the average person.

 

A good friend just moved to Maryland and she likes it.  I think she was able to get a house there for about 1/3 of what she sold for here.  Seattle is losing a lot of people under the age of 40 to all sorts of places.  We have friends that have moved to Nevada, Utah, Texas, Michigan, Minnesota, Georgia, Maryland, Virginia, Noth Carolina, Tennesee, Ohio and more.  Not just one family to each state either.  With half burned houses and empty lots off alleys going for $500k here and the houses, a lot of my (not wealthy) friends grew up in now going for $1-2 million, it's not hard to see why even fairly well-off families might want to leave.  

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Quill said:

Seriously - your list sounds like central Maryland, except maybe cost of living; you gotta move away from the cities before housing prices don’t induce a stroke. BUT! If it does induce a stroke, we are so close to top-notch medical care! Healthcare and IT job markets are robust here and we have several excellent universities. 

About the hot-as-hades thing: this, along with colder-than-the-heart-of-Elsa are two weather aspects that eliminate large swaths of the country for me whenever I start thinking of what state I would live in besides here. When we have heat here, it virtually always comes with intense humidity. It makes being outdoors legitimately awful to me. I don’t even understand 110*F. I have been to FL in August once and the main thing I remember was the unbearable heat and constant thunderstorms. I also don’t think there’s any hiking there because there’s no such thing as a hill. 

But then freezing cold is a problem too! You MN reps or ME or VT...how do you survive the winter?! How much does your heating costs come to? I already cannot survive without fuzzy socks, lambskin mocossins, a down comforter and double layers every winter day. 

I think I must be more weather-sensitive than the average person.

 

On the weather at potential locations, my view is that you shouldn't eliminate areas because of the extremes of weather in an area.  For one thing, if you do enough of that, all that will be left is CA and HI, neither of which you can afford.  People look at Texas weather in the middle of summer which can be 100+ and think "I don't want to be outside in that weather, so I couldn't live there."    But, they don't stop to think that they have snow, when our days are in the 70's.   So, I think a better method would be to assume that anywhere you (or I) can afford to live, there will be days when you just won't want to be outside.   Because, really, it doesn't matter if it is 95 or 105 or 115, I am not going to want to be outside.   The same goes for the lower end, most sane people also a lower end temp below which it doesn't really matter what it is, anything that or below they won't go outside.   For me that is 45F, for my Minnesota relatives it is about 25F.   For them 25F or -10F, the only difference is the energy bill.   I don't mean to pick on Minnesota, just that with my relatives there I am familiar with it.  

So, for an area, you try to figure out how many Stay Inside days there are, and how many Lovely Days and compare the two numbers.   For the DFW area, in a normal year, there is about two months of Stay Inside days, and six months of Lovely days.   In Spring and Fall, I go three months each of no heat or A/C and the house in the 70's with the windows opened at least part of the day.  When we moved into our current, forever home in December we knew the furnace didn't work.   That was a cold winter, and we were fine with one space heater in the main living area, and a tiny one in DD's bedroom at night.  


Another thing to look at is what do the people in the area get excited about, positively or negatively?    For example, people in the San Jose, CA area lose their collective minds in a normal rain, with commutes doubling or more.  One time my mom and I did a Napa Valley tour and my mom kept commenting on how nice the weather was.  I just sort of grunted and wondered why she kept mentioning it.   Then I realized I'd picked up the local expectation of Weather Always Lovely (Yawn).    To contrast when I was a kid visiting my Minnesota cousin.   We were walking to the beach and there were all these adults in their front yards on a weekday.   I asked my cousin if I'd forgotten a holiday.   She said that they's called in sick because it was a nice day.   I swore to myself that I'd try to not live anywhere that happens.  
 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, shawthorne44 said:

 

On the weather at potential locations, my view is that you shouldn't eliminate areas because of the extremes of weather in an area.  For one thing, if you do enough of that, all that will be left is CA and HI, neither of which you can afford.  People look at Texas weather in the middle of summer which can be 100+ and think "I don't want to be outside in that weather, so I couldn't live there."    But, they don't stop to think that they have snow, when our days are in the 70's.   So, I think a better method would be to assume that anywhere you (or I) can afford to live, there will be days when you just won't want to be outside.   Because, really, it doesn't matter if it is 95 or 105 or 115, I am not going to want to be outside.   The same goes for the lower end, most sane people also a lower end temp below which it doesn't really matter what it is, anything that or below they won't go outside.   For me that is 45F, for my Minnesota relatives it is about 25F.   For them 25F or -10F, the only difference is the energy bill.   I don't mean to pick on Minnesota, just that with my relatives there I am familiar with it.  

So, for an area, you try to figure out how many Stay Inside days there are, and how many Lovely Days and compare the two numbers.   For the DFW area, in a normal year, there is about two months of Stay Inside days, and six months of Lovely days.   In Spring and Fall, I go three months each of no heat or A/C and the house in the 70's with the windows opened at least part of the day.  When we moved into our current, forever home in December we knew the furnace didn't work.   That was a cold winter, and we were fine with one space heater in the main living area, and a tiny one in DD's bedroom at night.  


Another thing to look at is what do the people in the area get excited about, positively or negatively?    For example, people in the San Jose, CA area lose their collective minds in a normal rain, with commutes doubling or more.  One time my mom and I did a Napa Valley tour and my mom kept commenting on how nice the weather was.  I just sort of grunted and wondered why she kept mentioning it.   Then I realized I'd picked up the local expectation of Weather Always Lovely (Yawn).    To contrast when I was a kid visiting my Minnesota cousin.   We were walking to the beach and there were all these adults in their front yards on a weekday.   I asked my cousin if I'd forgotten a holiday.   She said that they's called in sick because it was a nice day.   I swore to myself that I'd try to not live anywhere that happens.  
 

Dh and I are going to a family reunion in the San Jose area this fall.  I am super excited.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, LucyStoner said:

Living on the wild side.  I like it.  

I am an over-planner and went all accountant-like with spreadsheets for a move we didn't actually end up making, lol.  To be fair, since I am an accountant, going all accountant-like wasn't entirely unforeseen.  We were looking for a reasonable cost of living, decent healthcare IT job market, proximity to universities, NOT HOT AS HADES and politically mixed or leaning blue metro area, if not state.  

 

It's okay. We need people like you too. I am a list maker on all other issues but the accounting stuff I will leave gladly to you.

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Quill said:

I think I must be more weather-sensitive than the average person.

 

I am with you on the weather. I thrive in temps between F68 -F78. I am the perfect candidate for coastal CA...but live in the F 108 valley. At least no humidity to speak of but when you wipe the sheen off your forehead at 6am, the lack of humidity is no great comfort either.

I've been to FL in July or August (?) several years back and it was very humid but I loved the thunderstorms. :)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

48 minutes ago, shawthorne44 said:

 

On the weather at potential locations, my view is that you shouldn't eliminate areas because of the extremes of weather in an area.  For one thing, if you do enough of that, all that will be left is CA and HI, neither of which you can afford.  People look at Texas weather in the middle of summer which can be 100+ and think "I don't want to be outside in that weather, so I couldn't live there."    But, they don't stop to think that they have snow, when our days are in the 70's.   So, I think a better method would be to assume that anywhere you (or I) can afford to live, there will be days when you just won't want to be outside.   Because, really, it doesn't matter if it is 95 or 105 or 115, I am not going to want to be outside.   The same goes for the lower end, most sane people also a lower end temp below which it doesn't really matter what it is, anything that or below they won't go outside.   For me that is 45F, for my Minnesota relatives it is about 25F.   For them 25F or -10F, the only difference is the energy bill.   I don't mean to pick on Minnesota, just that with my relatives there I am familiar with it.  

So, for an area, you try to figure out how many Stay Inside days there are, and how many Lovely Days and compare the two numbers.   For the DFW area, in a normal year, there is about two months of Stay Inside days, and six months of Lovely days.   In Spring and Fall, I go three months each of no heat or A/C and the house in the 70's with the windows opened at least part of the day.  When we moved into our current, forever home in December we knew the furnace didn't work.   That was a cold winter, and we were fine with one space heater in the main living area, and a tiny one in DD's bedroom at night.  


Another thing to look at is what do the people in the area get excited about, positively or negatively?    For example, people in the San Jose, CA area lose their collective minds in a normal rain, with commutes doubling or more.  One time my mom and I did a Napa Valley tour and my mom kept commenting on how nice the weather was.  I just sort of grunted and wondered why she kept mentioning it.   Then I realized I'd picked up the local expectation of Weather Always Lovely (Yawn).    To contrast when I was a kid visiting my Minnesota cousin.   We were walking to the beach and there were all these adults in their front yards on a weekday.   I asked my cousin if I'd forgotten a holiday.   She said that they's called in sick because it was a nice day.   I swore to myself that I'd try to not live anywhere that happens.  

 

I’m sure that in time I would adapt but I am  presently almost non-functional past a certain, not actually all that hot, temperature.  I don’t even like sitting in air conditioning.  I’m kind of cranky and a little stupid when it’s really hot.  I’m much happier bundled up inside than trying to stay cool inside.  I’m spoiled living where I do because it’s pretty much always 30-70 degrees.  Since I have other reasons for staying put, I’ll take the Goldilocks not too hot, not to cold weather happily.  I was born past due at the end of a record hot Texas July.  When I had my older son in June in Seattle I realized just how much I really owed my mother.  ?

We barely use our heating.  Just a bit from November to February and even then, the windows are open part of the day almost yearround. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, shawthorne44 said:

 

On the weather at potential locations, my view is that you shouldn't eliminate areas because of the extremes of weather in an area.  For one thing, if you do enough of that, all that will be left is CA and HI, neither of which you can afford.  People look at Texas weather in the middle of summer which can be 100+ and think "I don't want to be outside in that weather, so I couldn't live there."    But, they don't stop to think that they have snow, when our days are in the 70's.   So, I think a better method would be to assume that anywhere you (or I) can afford to live, there will be days when you just won't want to be outside.   Because, really, it doesn't matter if it is 95 or 105 or 115, I am not going to want to be outside.   The same goes for the lower end, most sane people also a lower end temp below which it doesn't really matter what it is, anything that or below they won't go outside.   For me that is 45F, for my Minnesota relatives it is about 25F.   For them 25F or -10F, the only difference is the energy bill.   I don't mean to pick on Minnesota, just that with my relatives there I am familiar with it.  

So, for an area, you try to figure out how many Stay Inside days there are, and how many Lovely Days and compare the two numbers.   For the DFW area, in a normal year, there is about two months of Stay Inside days, and six months of Lovely days.   In Spring and Fall, I go three months each of no heat or A/C and the house in the 70's with the windows opened at least part of the day.  When we moved into our current, forever home in December we knew the furnace didn't work.   That was a cold winter, and we were fine with one space heater in the main living area, and a tiny one in DD's bedroom at night.  


Another thing to look at is what do the people in the area get excited about, positively or negatively?    For example, people in the San Jose, CA area lose their collective minds in a normal rain, with commutes doubling or more.  One time my mom and I did a Napa Valley tour and my mom kept commenting on how nice the weather was.  I just sort of grunted and wondered why she kept mentioning it.   Then I realized I'd picked up the local expectation of Weather Always Lovely (Yawn).    To contrast when I was a kid visiting my Minnesota cousin.   We were walking to the beach and there were all these adults in their front yards on a weekday.   I asked my cousin if I'd forgotten a holiday.   She said that they's called in sick because it was a nice day.   I swore to myself that I'd try to not live anywhere that happens.  
 

You make a very good point, but my personal weirdness is that I don’t want to live where it never snows, or where it’s so unexpected that nobody has a proper coat or knows how to drive. I’m not outdoorsy in the snow - I’m too sensitive to the cold - but I like to look at it and I love a great snowstorm. I think, out of living where temp extremes run too hot vs. run too cold, I would pick cold as the lesser evil. I like New England-y clothes; I like a great big wood-burning fireplace in the family room. And Christmas! The thought of Christmas with everyone in shorts and sundresses...well, it’s not my thing, I guess. 

Maybe I just need a cabin in Vermont and then I will go Snowbirding for two months of the year after Christmas. ? My DS18 keeps saying he wants to move to CA, so maybe that can be my plan for Jan and Feb each year: I’ll go live with DS and perturb my future DIL! 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We recently moved to North Carolina, close to but not on the coast just south of the Outer Banks. Two rivers meet and our new town is between the rivers so there is boating, fishing, etc... The town is historic so people visit and vacation in the area plus the town hosts different events like parades, festivals, music events, etc...throughout the year. Those were the things that influenced our decisions to move here plus dh is from NC and we have tons of family close enough to visit for a day trip.

The homeschooling laws aren't bad. I am used to NJ which requires basically nothing. NC requires you to register and test yearly. The trade-off for us is free dual enrollment which is nice.

The cost of living is way less expensive than NJ. Taxes, car insurance, etc...are less than half what we were paying and I don't have to work until I decide I want to (probably once dd goes off to college).

I am not sure about the politics overall. It seems there are a lot of people moving here from the northeast...all my neighbors are retired from somewhere else so the politics, which may once have been more conservative might be closer to half and half. People generally don't seem as worried about what others are doing but that could just be a result of us just moving in...ask me in another year or two. Nearly everyone we have met has asked if we've found a church yet.

People here in our new town are very friendly and seem to do things together. This could be a result of many retired people moving here from other areas. Our neighborhood has a book club plus there are seem to be activities for just about anything you might want to be involved in.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Quill said:

You make a very good point, but my personal weirdness is that I don’t want to live where it never snows, or where it’s so unexpected that nobody has a proper coat or knows how to drive. ...


Just another sign of the wonderful differences in people.   I HATE snow with a purple passion.  Probably because we had a corner lot in Minnesota, but I remember the snow staying white and pretty for about 20 minutes when it snowed overnight.  I associate it with misery and I think of it more as distinctly gray, not white.  
Like the PP mentioned being grumpy about the heat even while inside, that is how I am the two days every three years that it snows.  I close the curtains and pretend it isn't snowing.  Snow would only be allowed on ski trails if I were in charge of the universe. 

It is nice not having to plan Halloween costumes around a winter coat.  

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

How about Iowa? I just picked up a dozen pieces of corn from the local roadside stand and it's DIVINE! I sometimes wish I could send everyone I know some Iowa sweet corn. No beaches, but great fishing on the Mighty Mississippi, beautiful rolling hills, fresh air and even pretty big cities (if that's what you desire). A lot of people that transplant here say they they surprisingly love it!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Donna said:

I am not sure about the politics overall. It seems there are a lot of people moving here from the northeast...all my neighbors are retired from somewhere else so the politics, which may once have been more conservative might be closer to half and half. People generally don't seem as worried about what others are doing but that could just be a result of us just moving in...ask me in another year or two. Nearly everyone we have met has asked if we've found a church yet.

 

You are correct about it being half and half.  We have lived here 12 years.  First election, the state went blue, but it took 3 weeks AFTER the election to count up the votes because the margin was so narrow.  Second election for us, went red, but it was after the election when it was finally figured out because it was so close.  This last election, also red, but also VERY close.

Typically Charlotte and Raleigh are blue, but the rest of the state is not.

As for the church thing....just know that this entire area is strongly one of 3 denominations.  Baptist, Methodist, or Presbyterian.  If you are another denomination, your choices are fewer.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quote

am not sure about the politics overall. It seems there are a lot of people moving here from the northeast...all my neighbors are retired from somewhere else so the politics, which may once have been more conservative might be closer to half and half. People generally don't seem as worried about what others are doing but that could just be a result of us just moving in...ask me in another year or two. Nearly everyone we have met has asked if we've found a church yet.

I’m sure some people love that and it makes them feel so welcome but that would really annoy me. It is one thing I like where I live; people generally mind their own business about their faith unless they are already amongst people they assume are of their same faith (like at a Bible study). 

I feel like I would be really tempted to pull their leg with some remark like, “well, we have been looking but there don’t seem to be as many Church of Satan fellowships as in our previous state.” ?

  • Like 1
  • Haha 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Donna said:

We recently moved to North Carolina, close to but not on the coast just south of the Outer Banks. Two rivers meet and our new town is between the rivers so there is boating, fishing, etc... The town is historic so people visit and vacation in the area plus the town hosts different events like parades, festivals, music events, etc...throughout the year. Those were the things that influenced our decisions to move here plus dh is from NC and we have tons of family close enough to visit for a day trip.

The homeschooling laws aren't bad. I am used to NJ which requires basically nothing. NC requires you to register and test yearly. The trade-off for us is free dual enrollment which is nice.

The cost of living is way less expensive than NJ. Taxes, car insurance, etc...are less than half what we were paying and I don't have to work until I decide I want to (probably once dd goes off to college).

I am not sure about the politics overall. It seems there are a lot of people moving here from the northeast...all my neighbors are retired from somewhere else so the politics, which may once have been more conservative might be closer to half and half. People generally don't seem as worried about what others are doing but that could just be a result of us just moving in...ask me in another year or two. Nearly everyone we have met has asked if we've found a church yet.

People here in our new town are very friendly and seem to do things together. This could be a result of many retired people moving here from other areas. Our neighborhood has a book club plus there are seem to be activities for just about anything you might want to be involved in.

 

I'm always surprised when people say that. Not doubting their experience at all, just surprised. I've lived in NC my entire life (55 years) and I'd estimate that I've been asked that question maybe ten times total. And only one of those times has been in the last ten years. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...