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Please help me evaluate my plans/schedule!


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I always make a schedule for our days. I need that for me to see how to make it work and about how it will look. In practice we don't follow the schedule to a t or live by the clock, but I use it as a framework and we typically follow a routine that's pretty close to it. 

I cannot get it to work for this coming year. I only have 2 kids so I feel like I must be missing something since I see so many homeschoolers with several that are managing it. It is however my first year with 2 full time kids as youngest will be 1st. Older will be 5th. I don't know if I'm expecting too much, have too much teacher intensive, or if I'm misjudging times needed. IDK, but whatever it is, I don't think just waiting and seeing how it goes will be the right answer for me. 

So anyone want to look over my plans/schedule and help me see what I need to change? 

DD 5th:
Singapore
RSO bio 2
HO finishing ancients and then middle ages
GSWL
Keyboarding without tears
AAS
fix-it grammar
WTM style writing across the curriculum
EC: ninja warrior/parkour class, theater, 1x month book club

DD 1st:
Singapore
RSO life (She has requested her own science)
BYL K year (I got this for K but she wanted less structure and we decided to save it for 1st.)
Keyboarding without tears
AAR
AAS when we finish AAR1
Handwriting/writing practice like WWE 
EC: ninja warrior/parkour class, theater, 1x month book club

We also LOVE games and need to make time for games that will sometimes be educational and sometimes not (although I feel there is great value in even the non-educational games). We are in a 1x/week co-op. I need to also fit in art sometimes, we use HAS. I'd like to start teaching them piano (I play and have intended to teach them every year and we never get to it). 

Morning time will be: read alouds, memory work, mindfulness activities (greatly needed and recommended by their therapist), and a bit of sign language

My schedule so far:
M, W, F
8:30- Morning time
9:30- 5th-Math lesson w/me; 1st-handwriting and keyboarding
10:00 - 5th does math wb and mental math drill; 1st-math and phonics with me
10:30 - 5th-spelling, grammar, writing, and latin. I'll need to help with most so will let 1st be free
11:30 - 5th-history reading/independent parts 1st-reading BYL with me
12:00 - 5th - remaining history with me then keyboarding while I make lunch
12:30 - lunch break and time outside
1:30 - 5th - Science reading/independent 1st - science with me
2:00 - 5th - Continue science with me
2:30 - Independent reading time/quiet time
3:00 - Games

T: Co-op from 9:00-12:30, possibly to 3:30 if either joins a specialty class this year (like FLL, odyssey of the mind...)

TH
8:30 - Morning time
9:30- 5th-Math lesson w/me; 1st-handwriting and keyboarding
10:00 - 5th - math wb and mental math drill; 1st-math and phonics with me
10:30 - 5th-spelling, grammar, writing, and latin
11:30 - 5th - science; 1st - BYL with me
12:00 - 5th finish science with me then keyboarding
12:30 - lunch break then get ready
1:30 - leave for ninja warrior class. Short break between then they have theater in the evening. (ninja class from 2-3, theater from 4-5 for 1st and from 5-6 for 5th.)

This feels so crammed and very next, next, next. I want our homeschool to feel relaxed and fun not like a solid checklist to get through. This schedule doesn't even include art or time for field trips or nature exploration. I wanted Friday to be a day like that, but with our co-op day, we're already at only 4 work days. Also oldest has SPD and I'm not seeing a lot of flexibility in this for her to get the sensory input she needs to succeed. 

Any insight? 


 

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The first thing that jumps out at me is: Do you really need to cover science and history 3-4 days per week? What if you limited them to 1-2 days? Especially for a 1st grader I'd focus on the basics of reading, writing and math.

Can HO be more independent for your older? If she can read well and write summaries and simple outlines, she should be able to handle most of it on her own, freeing you up to work with your little one.

My experience having two with an age gap is that I had to focus on getting my older up to working for large chunks on her own so I could spend more time with her brother. We slowly adapted from doing every subject side by side to her studying independently for longer blocks, with an hour -- give or take -- set aside each morning for direct instruction. We cover whatever we need to go over in that hour, and then I turn her loose to work by herself (with me available for questions, of course). Gradually that hour has become less time for me to teach, and more time for us to discuss what she's learning. Some subjects we cover most every day (math, writing when she's working on a paper) and some we do on a rotating basis (e.g., we discuss history typically once a week).

I try to avoid when possible splitting my time between the two kids. I know lots of moms make that work, but for us it just doesn't go well. If I am focusing on having a discussion with dd about the role of kinetic energy in the denaturing of proteins, or the arguments of the Federalists vs. the Anti-Federalists, or the role of symbolism in A Tale of Two Cities, I can't switch gears to show ds how to carry the 10. That's partly me and partly just a function of their vastly different stages. So if I am working with dd, ds either does something he can do without any help at all from me, or he gets free time. He needs frequent breaks, and I like for him to have plenty of time to explore outside on his own, so this works out fine. Your kids are not so far apart as mine (they are 6 years apart chronologically, but ds is on grade level but highly distractable and dd is focused and works 1-2 years ahead) so you might not have as many of those issues as I do.

I make a daily schedule like you've done every year, and I always find that I'm generally overestimating the time it takes for us to do things. (Usually. If ds is having a particularly unfocused day, maybe not.) So you might wait until you're up and running and see if your plan needs some tweaks then. If it does, you might want to think about your priorities. The older my dd gets, the harder it is for us to plan to be out of the house for long stretches, not to mention a whole day. It's just the way of the world, unfortunately.

HTH!

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2 minutes ago, PeachyDoodle said:

The first thing that jumps out at me is: Do you really need to cover science and history 3-4 days per week? What if you limited them to 1-2 days? Especially for a 1st grader I'd focus on the basics of reading, writing and math.

True, I probably don't need both so much for my 1st grader. I kept it the same most days but just once or twice will likely be enough for science. BYL is super light so we could probably do the entire week in a couple days. So I guess I could have just one block a day for her that would alternate BYL or RSO. That would free me up to help older with science.  But for older, looking through Bio 2, I don't think it can be done in just 2 days a week. She will definitely need 3-4 days a week. And science is what she lives for, so she will want it that way, as well. I alternated last year with science 2 days a week and history 2 days a week and she balked at the no-science days. Content-wise I think she is more than ready for this level, actual amount of work and output worries me, though. Her mind can work well ahead of her motor skills. 

Can HO be more independent for your older? If she can read well and write summaries and simple outlines, she should be able to handle most of it on her own, freeing you up to work with your little one.

She cannot be very independent. I'm actually worried that this schedule already has her working too independently. I do plan on her doing the reading herself this year, but honestly, history is not my strongest so I will need to find opportunities to read ahead so I am familiar with the content. I have her still doing level 1 of HO since we are doing level 2 of RSO. She wouldn't be able to keep up with the output of level 2 for both. 

My experience having two with an age gap is that I had to focus on getting my older up to working for large chunks on her own so I could spend more time with her brother. We slowly adapted from doing every subject side by side to her studying independently for longer blocks, with an hour -- give or take -- set aside each morning for direct instruction. We cover whatever we need to go over in that hour, and then I turn her loose to work by herself (with me available for questions, of course). Gradually that hour has become less time for me to teach, and more time for us to discuss what she's learning. Some subjects we cover most every day (math, writing when she's working on a paper) and some we do on a rotating basis (e.g., we discuss history typically once a week).

I so wish we could do this but it likely won't be possible for a few years to come. She has mild special needs with ADHD, SPD, and GAD. She does not work well alone at all. Last year the only thing she did independently was her math workbook and even then I had to remain very near and re-focus her often. I'm really hoping to get her doing her history and science readings alone, but I expect her to need me for things like map work, summaries, and labs. For LA, she will need me almost 100%. 

I try to avoid when possible splitting my time between the two kids. I know lots of moms make that work, but for us it just doesn't go well. If I am focusing on having a discussion with dd about the role of kinetic energy in the denaturing of proteins, or the arguments of the Federalists vs. the Anti-Federalists, or the role of symbolism in A Tale of Two Cities, I can't switch gears to show ds how to carry the 10. That's partly me and partly just a function of their vastly different stages. So if I am working with dd, ds either does something he can do without any help at all from me, or he gets free time. He needs frequent breaks, and I like for him to have plenty of time to explore outside on his own, so this works out fine. Your kids are not so far apart as mine (they are 6 years apart chronologically, but ds is on grade level but highly distractable and dd is focused and works 1-2 years ahead) so you might not have as many of those issues as I do.

I would like to avoid this too! I tried it a couple times this year and it just doesn't work well! I tried to split the time so that when I'm working with 1st grader 5th grader is doing reading of some sort. I'm *hoping* this is doable but I honestly don't know. 

I make a daily schedule like you've done every year, and I always find that I'm generally overestimating the time it takes for us to do things. (Usually. If ds is having a particularly unfocused day, maybe not.) So you might wait until you're up and running and see if your plan needs some tweaks then. If it does, you might want to think about your priorities. The older my dd gets, the harder it is for us to plan to be out of the house for long stretches, not to mention a whole day. It's just the way of the world, unfortunately.

HTH!

Thank you so much for your thoughts! 

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Hm, that's tough. I'm sorry I wasn't really very helpful. ?

Could you combine them for history at least? It sounds like science is very important to your family and something both your girls enjoy with you one-on-one. But if you let little sister tag along with big sister for history it would give you a little breathing room. I know that would mean changing up some of your plans for BYL.

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1 hour ago, PeachyDoodle said:

Hm, that's tough. I'm sorry I wasn't really very helpful. ?

Could you combine them for history at least? It sounds like science is very important to your family and something both your girls enjoy with you one-on-one. But if you let little sister tag along with big sister for history it would give you a little breathing room. I know that would mean changing up some of your plans for BYL.

You were still helpful! Being able to bounce ideas off others and get ideas helps even if it's not a perfect fit! We did that this year and she enjoyed most of the reading, but content-wise it was just over her head. She said she doesn't want to tag along with sister next year and wants her own. I think part of it (possibly a very big part) is that with all of my oldest's needs, she ends up getting a lot of attention and one-on-one time because there is just no other way. So youngest wants to have all her own subjects so she has me to herself. Oldest is quite needy and we struggle to even get through phonics without oldest trying to get involved. Half the time I feel like I'm back to when oldest was in 1st and I was trying to keep a toddler out of our work, now the oldest is like the toddler and I can't keep her out of youngest's space and time with me. She reads really well so that's where I was hoping to direct her when I'm working with youngest. ?

 

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It does seem a bit long in some places (for example, in upper elementary, we usually did about 30-45 minutes per subject for math, history, and science, and you have about an hour each planned for those.) You could see if you might be able to trim those times at all--maybe at least history? But times can really vary, especially when you have a student with learning struggles and learning disabilities. I see 5.5 hours of school on your M-W-F schedule, and about 4 on Thursdays--that doesn't seem too unreasonable for a 5th grader. The other thing I wondered is whether you need a full hour for morning time. You could take another look at that and see if it really is needed. 

Sometimes you don't know what will work until you dive in and try it out. I would plan on implementing gradually--start with just 1-2 hours of school or just a couple of subjects, and see how it goes. Then gradually add on on additional subjects to see how things work out. You may find that you don't need quite as much time (or that there is a bit more "wiggle room" in the schedule than you are thinking right now.) Or you may find that pairing certain subjects doesn't work--and a different pairing might work better (by "pairing" I mean what you have one child doing while you work with another--sometimes I needed to do some shifting and tweaking with that to get it to work.)

Can your oldest do some of the sensory work she needs between subjects--and does she need you for that or can she do it on her own? I'm thinking if you do find that some of the subject times could be shortened a bit, there may be time in there depending on what she needs. 

Does your morning time include any kind of history? If so, maybe you don't need another independent history this year while you get used to schooling two?

Sometimes it's the outside activities that make a school day feel really long--and you may have to weigh out whether they are really worthwhile to do. You're really trying to make 5-day weeks fit into 3-4 days (3 full days and 1 mostly full day)--which works out fine with little ones but gets harder as they get older. I found that I needed to make more choices and decisions about what was truly valuable as my kids got older (taking into consideration their desires and also my goals for our school). For example, is a co-op day more important than an art/music day (or could co-op day include art/music)? It may be--only you can decide if it's worth giving up some flexibility or breathing room in the schedule. Is it time to move more towards year-round schooling to fit in the activities they want and make the school days not as long? 

I remember the year that my kids were in 3rd and 5th was a tough year mentally for me. The previous year, I had moved lunch a bit later so that I could still say we were "done by lunch," but I just couldn't do that as they got older. (Both of mine also needed lots of one on one and scaffolding, so I know it can be tough to fit in what they need.) Time-wise, I found that our upper elementary days were usually 4-6 hours of academics, junior high was 5-7 hours, and high school 6-8 hours. Thankfully the changes happened gradually! But it could be you've hit one of those transition points that takes a mental adjustment, so that's why I bring that up.

I hope you can find a way to make things work and maintain some of that relaxed feel too!

 

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I think you’ve chosen some great materials.  AAS/AAR and BYL are the only really teacher time intensive things I see. Do you have parkour and theater every day? That’s your time hog - 15+ hours a week. Either pare that down or if it’s that important pare down some content work redundancies.

Can some of the work be done while at theater class waiting for sibling group?

Doing HO and RSO Bio 2 AND WTM style writing across curriculum has redundancy.  I know HO has writing assignments in it already, and there is some writing in RSO Bio 2 (lab reports).  I would reconsider this combo. Maybe don’t add writing across the curriculum? Or a history with less writing? Also, I really like  RSO Bio 2, and used it for DS when in 5th. It is easily done independently (except grading SWYK and reports), even many labs will only need you to consult. 

RSO’s sciences have options to do fewer days a week. Would that help?

I’d ditch spelling for 5th grader. Also consider AAS (which has dictation) as filling a portion of your writing. I am a better late than early person for composition and grammar so I would ditch WWE altogether. Does’t BYL also have writing and othe LA activities in it? 

Good luck working it all out - sounds like some fun things this year!

eTA: I see i was blending the MWF and TH schedules. Sorry!!

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16 minutes ago, MerryAtHope said:

It does seem a bit long in some places (for example, in upper elementary, we usually did about 30-45 minutes per subject for math, history, and science, and you have about an hour each planned for those.) You could see if you might be able to trim those times at all--maybe at least history? But times can really vary, especially when you have a student with learning struggles and learning disabilities. I see 5.5 hours of school on your M-W-F schedule, and about 4 on Thursdays--that doesn't seem too unreasonable for a 5th grader. The other thing I wondered is whether you need a full hour for morning time. You could take another look at that and see if it really is needed. 

I so wish we could trim down math! She can make a single worksheet take an hour! I'm really hoping that we can get math done in less than an hour and that she can then use the rest of that hour as a break while I finish with DD6. That would help a lot. History I have 45 minutes planned and have her doing keyboarding for the remainder of that hour. Maybe I can trim that some more, especially since I'm having her stay in level 1 of HO this year. Science we'll have to try out and see. RSO 2 looks like So. Much. Maybe we need to make it 45 minutes regardless and we just keep picking up where we left off and not worry about completing it within one school year? She's at the younger age range for it.

I'll do a run through of morning time sometime next week and see how long it takes.  Partially I also over-estimate because transitions are a beast for DD10. 

Sometimes you don't know what will work until you dive in and try it out. I would plan on implementing gradually--start with just 1-2 hours of school or just a couple of subjects, and see how it goes. Then gradually add on on additional subjects to see how things work out. You may find that you don't need quite as much time (or that there is a bit more "wiggle room" in the schedule than you are thinking right now.) Or you may find that pairing certain subjects doesn't work--and a different pairing might work better (by "pairing" I mean what you have one child doing while you work with another--sometimes I needed to do some shifting and tweaking with that to get it to work.)

Can your oldest do some of the sensory work she needs between subjects--and does she need you for that or can she do it on her own? I'm thinking if you do find that some of the subject times could be shortened a bit, there may be time in there depending on what she needs. 

If I put some prep work in ahead of time she could. I can make her up some prompt cards of what to do. That would be great if she could do that on her own after math while I finish reading lessons with 6yo. 

Does your morning time include any kind of history? If so, maybe you don't need another independent history this year while you get used to schooling two?

Not regularly, no.

Sometimes it's the outside activities that make a school day feel really long--and you may have to weigh out whether they are really worthwhile to do. You're really trying to make 5-day weeks fit into 3-4 days (3 full days and 1 mostly full day)--which works out fine with little ones but gets harder as they get older. I found that I needed to make more choices and decisions about what was truly valuable as my kids got older (taking into consideration their desires and also my goals for our school). For example, is a co-op day more important than an art/music day (or could co-op day include art/music)? It may be--only you can decide if it's worth giving up some flexibility or breathing room in the schedule. Is it time to move more towards year-round schooling to fit in the activities they want and make the school days not as long? 

Our co-op is definitely worth it, we absolutely love it! But I could probably start counting some of what they do there and lessening that burden at home. They each almost always have some form of art for at least one class. They'll likely be getting in some math play and science, as well.

I intend to do school through summer every year and every year it gets away from us and we don't do much! But yes, maybe we're reaching the point where we will have to make that a priority in order to keep the co-op day. I guess that would give me more room to lessen history and science time each day.

I remember the year that my kids were in 3rd and 5th was a tough year mentally for me. The previous year, I had moved lunch a bit later so that I could still say we were "done by lunch," but I just couldn't do that as they got older. (Both of mine also needed lots of one on one and scaffolding, so I know it can be tough to fit in what they need.) Time-wise, I found that our upper elementary days were usually 4-6 hours of academics, junior high was 5-7 hours, and high school 6-8 hours. Thankfully the changes happened gradually! But it could be you've hit one of those transition points that takes a mental adjustment, so that's why I bring that up.

Yes, this has the feel of a transition year! I knew logically that 5th and 1st would be more work than 4th and K, but I don't think I was ready for just how much different it would be. 

I hope you can find a way to make things work and maintain some of that relaxed feel too!

 

Thank you for all your thoughts on this! 

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2 minutes ago, Targhee said:

I think you’ve chosen some great materials.  AAS/AAR and BYL are the only really teacher time intensive things I see. Do you have parkour and theater every day? That’s your time hog - 15+ hours a week. Either pare that down or if it’s that important pare down some content work redundancies.

No, those are just on Thursdays. So 1 hour of each per week. 

Can some of the work be done while at theater class waiting for sibling group?

This may be possible.

Doing HO and RSO Bio 2 AND WTM style writing across curriculum has redundancy.  I know HO has writing assignments in it already, and there is some writing in RSO Bio 2 (lab reports).  I would reconsider this combo. Maybe don’t add writing across the curriculum? Or a history with less writing? Also, I really like  RSO Bio 2, and used it for DS when in 5th. It is easily done independently (except grading SWYK and reports), even many labs will only need you to consult. 

I'm keeping her in level 1 for HO so not very much writing. I always struggle with what to do for writing. That's the subject she struggles in the most and her handwriting skills are below grade level (though finally improving). I want to do enough but not over-do it. Maybe that can be something I wait to see if we need to add anything in or if the writing she gets between RSO, HO, and AAS will be enough. 

RSO’s sciences have options to do fewer days a week. Would that help?

She wants to do science every day. She sometimes asks for a science-only day haha! But I think I will just set a time on it and pick up where we left off when we can. 

I’d ditch spelling for 5th grader. Also consider AAS (which has dictation) as filling a portion of your writing. I am a better late than early person for composition and grammar so I would ditch WWE altogether. Does’t BYL also have writing and othe LA activities in it? 

I'm nervous to not include enough writing for DD6 after struggling so much through writing with DD10. Yes BYL has some. Maybe I will see what it looks like without WWE. Or stop when we start AAS which probably won't be until halfway through the year.

DD10 has only completed through AAS 3, isn't that too early to drop it? 

Good luck working it all out - sounds like some fun things this year!

Thank you!

 

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23 minutes ago, Seeking Squirrels said:

Thank you!

 

Sorry, I realized afterwards there were two separate schedules (I'm scrolling on my phone).

If writing is a difficulty, both handwriting and composition, then  I agree it needs your attention. I would go with a focused writing program, and not require writing in content areas. Also make sure to separate the tasks of penmanship and composition (eg copywork or other simple practice in handwriting, allowing typing or you scribing for composition time).  Something else to consider is that WTM writing instruction isn’t for everyone (it certainly wasn’t for my oldest three learners, and we had to take different approaches). It can be overwhelming to synthesize ideas for content areas, form them into coherent sentences in a composition, all  when you’re still struggling with fluid handwriting.   

Best wishes!

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I agree with others that each subject probably won’t take as long as you have scheduled. 

For 1st - I would not do keyboarding. Let her learn to read first. I would also not do RSO Science. It’s a great curriculum, but it’s going to take a lot of time. I would choose reading through “Let’s Read and Find Out” science series, watch the Magic School Bus series, and possibly sign up for the MSB Experiment subscription (or something simpler and not so time consuming).  I would also not do Science every day - even though that’s what she asks for.  Have her watch a Science video on the “off” days.  Go on nature walks in the evening or on weekends.

If you’re not combining kids, it’s best to choose easier to implement resources and alternate subjects/days.  Otherwise, you will find yourself sinking.  I have a 5th and 2nd grader this fall.  I encourage my 5th grader to do most work on her own.  I can review her work in the evenings and discuss if necessary.

Also, don’t be afraid to assign a half hour for science or history, and whatever isn’t completed could be finished on her own after dinner.  (Like actual homework)  We are implementing that with our 5th grader this year.  

And... you can also start the year with a smaller schedule and add things when you’re ready.

 

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I agree with the others. Focus on getting your first grader off to a good start in reading, writing and arithmetic. Everything else is gravy. She can listen on Big Sis's history and science. It is amazing how much they can pick up from an older child's lesson from just listening in. I

f she wants her own science, how about a monthly subscription box of experiments like Steve Spangler Science?  It should be fun and exciting for her without overwhelming you. You could even save the experiments for the weekend or after dinner as just fun science exploration. Science everyday doesn't necessarily have to be curriculum everyday, does it? Get some experiment books and let her choose a few to do each week. They don't have to have a theme, they can be different experiments from different areas of science if she wants. If she wants to do a certain experiment over again on another day, let her go for it. Science should be fun and hands-on if at all possible at her age. If she wants to deviate from the instructions and test her own hypothesis, more power to her! Make her a science kit with simple experiments she can complete on her own. Read the Zoey and Sassafras novels to her and help her understand the scientific method. Give her a notebook and Thinking Goggles like Zoey so she can be a scientist. My science minded, slightly advanced kindergartener is loving Zoey and Sassafras right now. I just see no reason to have two science curricula this year just so she can have science everyday.

I also agree with the others that a first grader does not need to learn to type. Once she can write and spell decently then you MIGHT try adding typing. The whole point of typing is speed and accuracy but it is hard to have either when you are still struggling to spell the words you want to type. Getting the skills of writing and spelling in order before starting keyboarding will make things go much more smoothly.

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I only included Keyboarding in my DD6's schedule because it is something she can do independently while I do math with DD10 and she likes it. Keyboarding without tears is simple and fun. I absolutely won't require it! I should probably just list computer time for her there because she also has subscriptions to ABCmouse and Sumdog and she could be using either of those during sister's math time, as well. 

DD10 is the science obsessed one, not DD6. I think DD6 wants her own science because she wants to ensure more one-on-one time with me rather than a shared subject! But if I can make sure she gets enough one-on-one time through her other subjects, I think she'd be happy with the light science included in BYL K. Maybe I'll play that one by ear and start out the year without RSO and see how independent DD10 can be during her science and history and if DD6 is wanting more.

DD10 wanting science every day isn't the only reason I have it scheduled that way. I was kind of overwhelmed when I looked over the course and I didn't think it would be possible to get through it all without scheduling 3-4 hours a week. But maybe I need to accept not finishing it in one school year and just see what we can do in an hour twice a week. If I do that I can alternate history and science and drop off that other block. I can tell DD10 she can do any extra science she wants on her own time. 

@Bay Lake Mom"Also, don’t be afraid to assign a half hour for science or history, and whatever isn’t completed could be finished on her own after dinner.  (Like actual homework)  We are implementing that with our 5th grader this year. "  I think I should do this for math. I know she is capable of the content, she just can drag it out so long. I might set a timer for workbook and anything left is on her own time. 

Thank you to everyone helping me think this through!

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I just want to give you a bit of encouragement. My oldest couldn't work independently and my kids, although close in age, hated to combine for anything. My schedule always looked like it was just one thing after another, but for them it really felt a little less so. They had independent work while I was working with their sibling and those times were pretty relaxed. Your kids may feel much less stressed by the schedule than you do. My younger would have wanted all the subjects and for them to be hers not combined too. It is ok to do that. You'll go back and forth and they'll come and go in a way that makes the day fly by.

The advice you have gotten for amount of time or number of days per subject is worth considering. However, like you, my ds was a slow math guy (in fact your dd sounds a lot like him). It took an hour a day until he got older and it took 90 minutes. It is just what it took. Don't try to make your kids be someone else's kids. Do what works for you and you'll all be ok ?

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2 hours ago, Mom22ns said:

I just want to give you a bit of encouragement. My oldest couldn't work independently and my kids, although close in age, hated to combine for anything. My schedule always looked like it was just one thing after another, but for them it really felt a little less so. They had independent work while I was working with their sibling and those times were pretty relaxed. Your kids may feel much less stressed by the schedule than you do. My younger would have wanted all the subjects and for them to be hers not combined too. It is ok to do that. You'll go back and forth and they'll come and go in a way that makes the day fly by.

The advice you have gotten for amount of time or number of days per subject is worth considering. However, like you, my ds was a slow math guy (in fact your dd sounds a lot like him). It took an hour a day until he got older and it took 90 minutes. It is just what it took. Don't try to make your kids be someone else's kids. Do what works for you and you'll all be ok ?

Thank you, this is all important to keep in mind. I don't want to make *my* schedule look better but end up having that feel more rushed to them because really I've just made them do the same work in less time or given them no time to transition.

I do think it will end up being necessary to do RSO separately with DD6. She has always been my quiet "good" kid that always felt so easy and low maintenance (especially after very high maintenance DD10!)  In the last year we've learned it was actually all severe anxiety keeping her from sharing when she was upset, sad, wanting something.... This child has never had a tantrum. Ever. Not even at 2 or 3. If I don't put time on the schedule for HER and HER school, it will easily be eaten up by DD10 who is very vocal and demanding of attention. 

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