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Dd Struggling to Choose a Major


DoraBora
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Dd is agonizing over choosing a college major.  Rather than continuing in her Information Technology and Systems major, she is considering a BBA with a Risk Management and Insurance concentration.  She was so unsure about the ITS major that she began taking career and interest inventory tests online, and this BBA came to her attention.  Tomorrow, she is going to see an advisor in order to rearrange her fall schedule so that all classes can work for either degree plan.  Hopefully, she can use the fall semester to research a bit more before she has to commit to a specific path.  From what I can tell, this will be the last semester she can take versatile basics.
 
I don't really know what one does with the BBA Risk Management/Insurance degree, so I've suggested that she go to the Career Center at her uni to ask THEM where students pursuing it find internships and what sorts of job titles graduates might have.
 
Any advice or other ideas?
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How closely a BBA in risk management and insurance will parallel a finance degree will vary from school to school.  Often, students who are interested in becoming an actuary, claims adjuster, insurance broker, or an underwriter will pursue degrees in this area.  Some will work in risk management for a corporation; others will go into banking.  Some will go into financial planning and wealth management.  

Was the ITS major a BBA also?  If so, changing from one major to the other will probably be fairly easy through the first semester of her junior year.   

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29 minutes ago, jdahlquist said:

Was the ITS major a BBA also?  If so, changing from one major to the other will probably be fairly easy through the first semester of her junior year.

The ITS major is through the College of Business, so they begin with the same basics, but it isn't a BBA.  In my day(!), ITS was called BCIS -- Bachelor of Computer Information Systems.

Thank you for all of the career area information!  That is so helpful!  ?

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In my day, there wasn't even a Information Systems degree ?  

I am a finance professor, and at some schools we have had two separate degrees for finance and for risk management/insurance and at other schools students receive a degree in finance with a specialization in risk management if they choose.  I did teach at one school where there was some dedicated scholarship money for insurance majors (there was a major insurance company headquartered in the city); there it made sense for the brightest students who wanted to major in finance to major in insurance to receive the scholarship money and then take pure finance courses as their electives.  

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At dd's school, Risk Management is a concentration for a BBA or BS in Finance.  I would think that there is a lot one can do with either degree.

Thank you again for the information.  I was a teacher, and the business world is the great unknown to me.  Hopefully, she can get some further guidance today.

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There are of course exceptions, but the BBA degree is going to tend to lead to more people-centric occupations. Claims adjustors talk to people all. day. long! And this holds true for a lot of the insurance-related jobs. You talk to your clients and your claimants and then you talk to your co-workers about  your clients and claimants. With IT, you will of course achieve more if you present well and interact with people easily, but it's more often work, work, work, present, work, work, discuss. The interaction is less constant and intense. 

So that's one big factor to consider. For the entry-level portions of your career in particular, it's a bit like dealing with systems vs dealing with people (with tremendous overlap, but IT has systems first and BBA has people first). The IT people develop and manage the systems that the BBA/risk people use. 

I'd also say that the BBA is more versatile. IT is IT, but risk is a part of every business, it doesn't matter so much what perspective you study it from (insurance or not). Some IT degrees include more risk management information than others. 

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I

1 hour ago, katilac said:

There are of course exceptions, but the BBA degree is going to tend to lead to more people-centric occupations. Claims adjustors talk to people all. day. long! And this holds true for a lot of the insurance-related jobs. You talk to your clients and your claimants and then you talk to your co-workers about  your clients and claimants. With IT, you will of course achieve more if you present well and interact with people easily, but it's more often work, work, work, present, work, work, discuss. The interaction is less constant and intense. 

So that's one big factor to consider. For the entry-level portions of your career in particular, it's a bit like dealing with systems vs dealing with people (with tremendous overlap, but IT has systems first and BBA has people first). The IT people develop and manage the systems that the BBA/risk people use. 

I'd also say that the BBA is more versatile. IT is IT, but risk is a part of every business, it doesn't matter so much what perspective you study it from (insurance or not). Some IT degrees include more risk management information than others. 

I would not necessarily agree wit this.  There are many non people-centric jobs for people with BBAs.  Within finance, there are some jobs that require a high amount of interaction with people (some with peers and others with customers) and some jobs that require very little interaction; there are some financial analysts that sit quietly at a desk, digging through reports and interacting with their computer.  

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12 minutes ago, jdahlquist said:

I

I would not necessarily agree wit this.  There are many non people-centric jobs for people with BBAs.  Within finance, there are some jobs that require a high amount of interaction with people (some with peers and others with customers) and some jobs that require very little interaction; there are some financial analysts that sit quietly at a desk, digging through reports and interacting with their computer.  

 

Certainly there are some, but I do think that it tends to have more people-centric jobs, and it tends to be easier to find people-centric ones at entry-level. I think this holds particularly true for the insurance industry, which is the specific concentration she is considering. 

Almost any degree can take you in various directions, certainly a BBA can, but a strong preference for people over systems or vice-versa might help her make the decision. 

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