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I'm not really doing anything with my dyslexics that I didn't do with my non-dyslexics.  (1 non, 1 dyslexic, and 1 dyslexic prepping - so far)

We do the red ACT prep book and a couple practice tests.  We knew we would not need extra time for DS because of the prep books.  For our third kiddo, I had her take a practice test at the end of her freshman year and knew we would need the additional time accomodation if we were to accurately assess her abilities.  We had her formally diagnosed and applied for accomodations through our district.  She had a 504 put in place her freshman year.  She was just recently approved for additional time - time and a half.  (It's the end of sophomore year.)

If you can think of anything specific, I'll answer what I can.  I think it's important for them to really just do a few questions each day so they can evaluate their shortcomings or how the test is worded.  I think they need to learn to cross off answers they know are wrong.  I think it's important they learn to narrow down answers.  I think they need a few practice tests so they can gauge their time well and know when to move on from a difficult question.

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Have your student practice all 4 tests untimed, separately at first, but also do at least one run-through of what it's like to do all 4 tests in one day. Coach your student on how to manage time as needed (since they just go from one test to the next and aren't told when to stop each one). 

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DS used the Real ACT prep book and did all the practice tests in the book, plus a couple more he found online, under timed conditions. He also used the online Prep Scholar program, which is pricier than a stack of prep books but less than an in-person prep class ($400 for 1 year of unlimited access). Even with accommodations (time & a half), he struggled to finish within the allotted time. He never did finish a math section within the time, but I think Prep Scholar really taught him how to tackle the English, Reading, and Science sections in the most effective and efficient way. He raised his score 5 points between the April test (for which he had done very little prep) and the September test, and managed to score perfect 36s in English and Reading — no small feat for a dyslexic kid with ADHD and extremely slow processing speed!

Where are you in the process of requesting accommodations? 

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23 hours ago, MerryAtHope said:

Have your student practice all 4 tests untimed, separately at first, but also do at least one run-through of what it's like to do all 4 tests in one day. Coach your student on how to manage time as needed (since they just go from one test to the next and aren't told when to stop each one). 

Thankfully they have just changed that policy — beginning with the September test, each section will be timed separately (exactly 150% time for each section), with everyone starting and stopping at the same time, just like the SAT. There will be one 15-minute break between Math & Reading.

I thought their previous policy of just giving one huge block of time, and putting the onus on the student to figure out exactly how much time to allot to each section, when to take breaks, etc., was crazy — especially since one of the most common reasons for accommodations is ADHD! So you take a room full of kids with a poor sense of time and a propensity for distraction, and expect them to not only keep perfect track of time with no reminders, but also resist being distracted by other students who are all starting and stopping and taking breaks at different times. ?

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On 6/23/2018 at 6:01 PM, Corraleno said:

Thankfully they have just changed that policy — beginning with the September test, each section will be timed separately (exactly 150% time for each section), with everyone starting and stopping at the same time, just like the SAT. There will be one 15-minute break between Math & Reading.

 

That makes so much more sense! Although some students really need the breaks too. It will be interesting to see how that works out overall.

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On 6/22/2018 at 10:33 AM, BlsdMama said:

I'm not really doing anything with my dyslexics that I didn't do with my non-dyslexics.  (1 non, 1 dyslexic, and 1 dyslexic prepping - so far)

We do the red ACT prep book and a couple practice tests.  We knew we would not need extra time for DS because of the prep books.  For our third kiddo, I had her take a practice test at the end of her freshman year and knew we would need the additional time accomodation if we were to accurately assess her abilities.  We had her formally diagnosed and applied for accomodations through our district.  She had a 504 put in place her freshman year.  She was just recently approved for additional time - time and a half.  (It's the end of sophomore year.)

If you can think of anything specific, I'll answer what I can.  I think it's important for them to really just do a few questions each day so they can evaluate their shortcomings or how the test is worded.  I think they need to learn to cross off answers they know are wrong.  I think it's important they learn to narrow down answers.  I think they need a few practice tests so they can gauge their time well and know when to move on from a difficult question.

Thank you, he was diagnoised at 13 he is now going on 16--he feels he may need extra time, but I am at loss as to what or how to perpare him--with his sister 11 years ago I did nothing to prepare her ?   So I thought of putting him into a prep class, but he gets kinda upset with his ability to spell and his handwriting is not the best for notes--he types his work at home we type it for him--he thinks faster then he can keep up with himself typing. Is this the book?  Do you read it to them?  

 51rKGsYvzQL._SX389_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

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On 6/23/2018 at 5:47 PM, Corraleno said:

DS used the Real ACT prep book and did all the practice tests in the book, plus a couple more he found online, under timed conditions. He also used the online Prep Scholar program, which is pricier than a stack of prep books but less than an in-person prep class ($400 for 1 year of unlimited access). Even with accommodations (time & a half), he struggled to finish within the allotted time. He never did finish a math section within the time, but I think Prep Scholar really taught him how to tackle the English, Reading, and Science sections in the most effective and efficient way. He raised his score 5 points between the April test (for which he had done very little prep) and the September test, and managed to score perfect 36s in English and Reading — no small feat for a dyslexic kid with ADHD and extremely slow processing speed!

Where are you in the process of requesting accommodations? 

Thank you - Your son did wonderful!   Sorry to say I am overshelmed and need to figure out how to request for accomodations. Honestly spent the past 2 years with OT, PT and Speech--and just last month we became aware that he has high frequncy hearing loss-- He was tested at 13 yr. 9 mo.-(this is when he came to us and said he is reading to slow and can't keep up - just thought he hhad spelling issues and OT, PT and speech said all was good...NOT)  he will be 16 in Aug.  The test lady wrote that he should have accommodations so I am guessing I send them alomg with her paper stating his diagnosis?   

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You should read the section on the ACT website about what kind of documentation they want to see, and follow their instructions to the letter. Use the kind of phrases and wording they use. Make sure that diagnostic codes (where appropriate) are used, and you should spell out very explicitly exactly how his disabilities affect testing. If he has always been homeschooled, spell out all the ways you have accommodated his issues at home, using the same kind of language that schools would use. If he was in school for part of the time and had an IEP or 504, include copies of that. Include copies of all the testing, with a cover sheet from the professional(s) spelling out what parts of the testing show what disabilities and why he should have accommodations. I was super thorough with all the documentation I sent in, and I included a cover letter listing his testing history, with key quotes from the various medical and educational testing providers he had used, and attached copies of all reports (1 psychiatrist and 2 ed psych specialists). He was approved for accommodations on both the ACT and SAT on the first try with no problem at all.

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12 hours ago, Ggg said:

Thank you, he was diagnoised at 13 he is now going on 16--he feels he may need extra time, but I am at loss as to what or how to perpare him--with his sister 11 years ago I did nothing to prepare her ?   So I thought of putting him into a prep class, but he gets kinda upset with his ability to spell and his handwriting is not the best for notes--he types his work at home we type it for him--he thinks faster then he can keep up with himself typing. Is this the book?  Do you read it to them?  

 51rKGsYvzQL._SX389_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg


This is the book.

Here's what we did:

1. Ordered the book.
2. Took a practice test with no time (but we marked where she was when the standard time was up.)
3. Scored the test.

*We found out she scored really well - HOWEVER, if she had "standard" time she would have only been half done with the test.  Seriously - half. Her scores would be abysmal with the standard time.  So, DS did not need time whereas DD did need time.  Both are "equally" dyslexic - both are moderates. 

  She reads really quite well.  However, she is not a fast reader, especially an hour into it.  She needed the extra time.  This is something you might want to consider and you need to pretty much get on it immediately if this is something you want/need for him.  Liz turned 16 in December.  The school district did most everything for us in applying for extra time and it was granted but she already had a 504 in place that helped.

So, studying.  Then take another test (there are four) and divide it up.  So, for example English - you'll just do 3 or 4 questions each day.  He'll read them, mark them, then you guys will go over the answers and why they are the answers.  Anything that is new to him (like a new grammar rule) put on a separate sheet of paper for review.  Easy Grammar is one way that we hit the stuff DS was unfamiliar with. 

Simply taking tests over and over might help a TINY bit but focused study over time - 20 minutes a day will make an impact.  He will get a feel for the test and get a good idea  of how they phrase questions.  That immediate correction of just a few questions and then focusing on what he doesn't know works well.  We had a daughter get a 35 on the English portion after focused study.  I believe she raised it 4-5 points.  DS got a 36 in the reading portion on his 2nd time.  So we saw definite improvement with study.  It's worth it.


So, can he read and digest those questions?  I don't know that the ACT allows readers?  Do you know? Because if they do not allow a reader then he will need to practice now.  Has he had remediation like Orton Gillingham based? 

It's so hard for me to give solid recommendations because even among my own dyslexics there is such a huge swing in ability.  I have one that is very mild and one that is severe/profound. Their abilities are very, very different. 





 

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5 hours ago, BlsdMama said:


This is the book.

Here's what we did:

1. Ordered the book.
2. Took a practice test with no time (but we marked where she was when the standard time was up.)
3. Scored the test.

*We found out she scored really well - HOWEVER, if she had "standard" time she would have only been half done with the test.  Seriously - half. Her scores would be abysmal with the standard time.  So, DS did not need time whereas DD did need time.  Both are "equally" dyslexic - both are moderates. 

  She reads really quite well.  However, she is not a fast reader, especially an hour into it.  She needed the extra time.  This is something you might want to consider and you need to pretty much get on it immediately if this is something you want/need for him.  Liz turned 16 in December.  The school district did most everything for us in applying for extra time and it was granted but she already had a 504 in place that helped.

So, studying.  Then take another test (there are four) and divide it up.  So, for example English - you'll just do 3 or 4 questions each day.  He'll read them, mark them, then you guys will go over the answers and why they are the answers.  Anything that is new to him (like a new grammar rule) put on a separate sheet of paper for review.  Easy Grammar is one way that we hit the stuff DS was unfamiliar with. 

Simply taking tests over and over might help a TINY bit but focused study over time - 20 minutes a day will make an impact.  He will get a feel for the test and get a good idea  of how they phrase questions.  That immediate correction of just a few questions and then focusing on what he doesn't know works well.  We had a daughter get a 35 on the English portion after focused study.  I believe she raised it 4-5 points.  DS got a 36 in the reading portion on his 2nd time.  So we saw definite improvement with study.  It's worth it.


So, can he read and digest those questions?  I don't know that the ACT allows readers?  Do you know? Because if they do not allow a reader then he will need to practice now.  Has he had remediation like Orton Gillingham based? 

It's so hard for me to give solid recommendations because even among my own dyslexics there is such a huge swing in ability.  I have one that is very mild and one that is severe/profound. Their abilities are very, very different. 





 

Thank you - honestly he can read at age level 14 - we have tried since he was tested to use what they recomended--Fast for Word(total bust (in fact seemed like it made him worse and depressed)-one full yr of OT, Speech, PT, his handwritting improved, but actually essay writing by hand not good--typing have seen improvement and we have high hopes that by Sr. yr. he has improved enough to take on college(he thinks and talks faster than he types and really bad handwritten cuz he can't spell and just the act.)  They told me it is all because of weak core and left handed(have my doubts-segustions welcomed),  We just finished Toe-BY-Toe which he showed the most improvement---NOW he tells me when he reads his lines jumble?? So going to get a VT eval--cuz I don't think this is due to being dyslesia? Or is it??  

Ok sorry side tracked--back to can he read and digest--well I thought he could comprehead well, but the fact is when it is read to him he does much better...not ruling out he can do it just yet.  I don't know if they allow readers, but I plan to find out.  But I do believe your plan of a solid practice routine will serve him well--I like it and was thinking along the same lines, I just have myself worked up--feeling I should not have wasted his time on listening to their advice and saught other before now.  

Beside Toe-By-Toe we have been using Logic of English - Essentials with the Reader, which he writes essays based on the reading(daughter is an English Major so she has been working with him) she says he has good thought and puts togther good sentences, but is unable to keep up with his typing and she feels he should use a speech to text program-idk if that is the right thing to do or just keep him typing away so his speed will increase? Sugestion-thoughts?  

Also, could you give me any segustions on what are some good books for him to read--again I am at loss.

I really do appreicate your imput -  thank you

 

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On ‎6‎/‎23‎/‎2018 at 7:01 PM, Corraleno said:

Thankfully they have just changed that policy — beginning with the September test, each section will be timed separately (exactly 150% time for each section), with everyone starting and stopping at the same time, just like the SAT. There will be one 15-minute break between Math & Reading.

I thought their previous policy of just giving one huge block of time, and putting the onus on the student to figure out exactly how much time to allot to each section, when to take breaks, etc., was crazy — especially since one of the most common reasons for accommodations is ADHD! So you take a room full of kids with a poor sense of time and a propensity for distraction, and expect them to not only keep perfect track of time with no reminders, but also resist being distracted by other students who are all starting and stopping and taking breaks at different times. ?

What good news!  This is exactly why I was thinking my dyslexic DS should take the SAT and skip the ACT altogether.

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