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Robin M

Book a Week 2018 - BW25: June Solstice

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3 hours ago, mumto2 said:

Barchester Towers.....I found an audiobook on Overdrive.  I Have several that I want to listen to first but am intrigued.

Before I forget to post a picture, The bookcase quilt is done.  This quilt is pretty personalized to the girl who will be receiving it.......pets, family jokes, color selections........

27B9BAE6-D1F9-4F5E-886B-484A785CC2FD.jpeg

Absolutely gorgeous. She'll love it.  

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59 minutes ago, LuvToRead said:

I didn't mean to hit quote on this post, but accidentally did and now I don't know how to get rid of it.  (If someone can tell me how to undo a quote I would appreciate it)

I really wanted to tell Mumto2 her quilt is beautiful.

On my computer, when I click on the quote box, I see a little box in the upper left hand corner that I click on, then hit delete. It usually gets rid of the quote box. Sometimes I just click on the quote and hit delete repeatedly until it disappears. I think the cursor has to be clicked on the box itself and not the words in order to delete the whole box.  Clear as mud I know but hope it makes some sort of sense.

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Thanks guys!  I just hope the girl receiving it enjoys it!  I just washed and dried it to make sure it can stand up to harder use then I normally give my quilts.  Came through great!  Btw, hedgehogs made it through the washing machine test too.  

2 hours ago, Kareni said:

What lovely work, mumto2!  What is your next quilting project?

Regards,
Kareni

I am back trying to finish my hand quilting project’s top.  Some of you have seen it in various stages but this is where I am now, one corner to go.  It’s sort of like a puzzle, all my pieces are cut out and read to go in ziplock bags.  I want to try and get it done for the horticultural show in September but not sure if I am up for spending the summer under that quilt finishing it.  Dh recently purchased some fun patterns for me to try by the same designer as the hedgehogs.  They are distracting me horribly so I may get the top completed and go on to do some other projects.  

 

14715867-5AF8-4B00-8B5F-AF6557EF1A6E.jpeg

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4 hours ago, mumto2 said:

Barchester Towers.....I found an audiobook on Overdrive.  I Have several that I want to listen to first but am intrigued.

Before I forget to post a picture, The bookcase quilt is done.  This quilt is pretty personalized to the girl who will be receiving it.......pets, family jokes, color selections........

27B9BAE6-D1F9-4F5E-886B-484A785CC2FD.jpeg

 

I see a ... goldfish, dog, bunny, hamster, and gnome?

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9 minutes ago, mumto2 said:

I am back trying to finish my hand quilting project’s top.  Some of you have seen it in various stages but this is where I am now, one corner to go.  It’s sort of like a puzzle, all my pieces are cut out and read to go in ziplock bags.

That also looks like it will end up being a lovely piece, mumto2.  I see what you mean about the puzzle aspect.  And, yes, I can appreciate being drawn away by other hedgehog type designs. I imagine that small projects are desirable in that they are more quickly done, says the total non-crafter.

Regards,
Kareni

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29 minutes ago, aggieamy said:

 

I see a ... goldfish, dog, bunny, hamster, and gnome?

Yes,  it’s sort of a hamster/guinea pig.  There have been many......I did not enjoy making the one! Lol. Two dogs......one has it’s picture (pre-printed fabric) in the frame.  Did you see them or ds?

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2 hours ago, Robin M said:

On my computer, when I click on the quote box, I see a little box in the upper left hand corner that I click on, then hit delete. It usually gets rid of the quote box. Sometimes I just click on the quote and hit delete repeatedly until it disappears. I think the cursor has to be clicked on the box itself and not the words in order to delete the whole box.  Clear as mud I know but hope it makes some sort of sense.

I tried it and it worked!  Thank you!

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I just finished an enjoyable anthology of three inclusive historical romance ~ 

Hamilton's Battalion: A Trio of Romances  by Roser Lerner, Courtney Milan, and Alyssa Cole 

"Love in the time of Hamilton…

On October 14, 1781, Alexander Hamilton led a daring assault on Yorktown's defenses and won a decisive victory in America's fight for independence. Decades later, when Eliza Hamilton collected his soldiers' stories, she discovered that while the war was won at Yorktown, the battle for love took place on many fronts...

PROMISED LAND by Rose Lerner

Donning men's clothing, Rachel left her life behind to fight the British as Corporal Ezra Jacobs--but life catches up with a vengeance when she arrests an old love as a Loyalist spy.

At first she thinks Nathan Mendelson hasn't changed one bit: he's annoying, he talks too much, he sticks his handsome nose where it doesn't belong, and he's self-righteously indignant just because Rachel might have faked her own death a little. She'll be lucky if he doesn't spill her secret to the entire Continental Army.

Then Nathan shares a secret of his own, one that changes everything...

THE PURSUIT OF... by Courtney Milan

What do a Black American soldier, invalided out at Yorktown, and a British officer who deserted his post have in common? Quite a bit, actually.

* They attempted to kill each other the first time they met.
* They're liable to try again at some point in the five-hundred-mile journey that they're inexplicably sharing.
* They are not falling in love with each other.
* They are not falling in love with each other.
* They are.... Oh no.

THAT COULD BE ENOUGH by Alyssa Cole

Mercy Alston knows the best thing to do with pesky feelings like "love" and "hope": avoid them at all cost. Serving as a maid to Eliza Hamilton, and an assistant in the woman's stubborn desire to preserve her late husband's legacy, has driven that point home for Mercy—as have her own previous heartbreaks.

When Andromeda Stiel shows up at Hamilton Grange for an interview in her grandfather's stead, Mercy's resolution to live a quiet, pain-free life is tested by the beautiful, flirtatious, and entirely overwhelming dressmaker.

Andromeda has staid Mercy reconsidering her worldview, but neither is prepared for love—or for what happens when it's not enough."

Regards,
Kareni

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It's been a week since I logged in and I come back to such gorgeous pictures. 

Kids and I finished Lockwood and Co series and we were left feeling unsatisfied. There is no closure. I can appreciate when authors leave endings open, but I admit to liking tidy endings. 

At the moment I am listening to America's First Daughter. Although, I admit that Chris Hemsworth as Thor is keeping from the book this evening.  

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Howdy.  My kids and I just finished the audiobook for The Prince and the Pauper.  The kids needed explanations about the language at times, but they found the story pretty fascinating.  I had never read it before, so I was pleasantly surprised at how many different fun things are in there.  ?   We listened to My Friend Flicka before that.

I'm about halfway through the boundaries book I started some weeks ago.

Also about halfway through our read-aloud, Spy School.  This has my kids' attention.  ?   It's not bad for a kids' book.

 

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21 hours ago, mumto2 said:

Yes,  it’s sort of a hamster/guinea pig.  There have been many......I did not enjoy making the one! Lol. Two dogs......one has it’s picture (pre-printed fabric) in the frame.  Did you see them or ds?

 

We looked at it together but he figured out the gnome way before I did. Both of us missed the dog in the frame!

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Some currently free books for Kindle readers ~

The Midnight Land: Part One: The Flight (The Zemnian Series Book 1)  by E.P. Clark

"A bold beginning to a series that explores gender, empathy, and the frozen north"--Kirkus

time travel: Lock & Key  by Gordon Bonnet

genre bending: Murphy’s Luck   by Benjamin Laskin

contemporary romance:  King of Code   by CD Reiss

Regards,
Kareni

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I'm on the Mystery Bus but in the wrong location. Actually I'm in two locations ... I'm reading I Capture the Castle (Suffolk) and I just finished Killer Instinct by Zoe Sharp (Lancashire). I'm just going to past my GR review here because it covered all my rants about the book.

I'm going to count this book even though I read only the first 100 pages and then the last 100 pages. Good premise but there was too much going on with this book.
(1) The FMC had so much backstory and trauma. It was too much for the first hundred pages.
(2) Shut up about the stupid motorcycles. We get it. Charlie rides a motorcycle and so do all her friends. I don't really care what type they rode, or how it handled, if it needed to be warmed up, or anything else. It's just transportation to the next interesting plot point.
(3) Super strange typos through out the book. Just as an example, one of the characters drove a BMW and then for the next twenty pages whenever it was mentioned it became ... "Charlie climbed into Marc's BM." Then magically at the end of the book it was referred to as a BMW again. *shrug*


It wasn't a bad book. If this is your thing though I've seen it done much better in the Lacey Flint series by Sharon J. Bolton.Now You See Me

I've also put about fifty Trollope novels in my library cart because of this thread. Oops. Project deadline is July 1st so I can get more reading in then!

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I recently started listening to The History of English Podcast.  And there are 112 episodes, so I will have it to listen to for a LONG time! It is so interesting - provided that you are the sort of person who enjoys a good 20 minutes on the historical trajectory of one particular sound change. And I think that some of you are that sort of person, so that is why I am recommending it here ? 

http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/

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Free today on Kindle:  Slater and Norman Mysteries Box Set
https://www.amazon.com/Slater-Norman-Mystery-Novels-One-ebook/dp/B01HVVFG8Q?_bbid=10182770&_bbtype=email
 

Contemporary and classic, the Dave Slater Mystery Novels are a great British blend of character, suspense and humour, making them the ideal for those readers who prefer good story over blood and gore. If this was a TV series, it would be the perfect Sunday evening drama.

The books in this UK based series have accumulated hundreds of reviews, with almost 90% of reviewers giving 4 and 5 stars. This collection includes the first four books in the series (and you get them for the price of two!):

Book 1: Death Of A Temptress

Ruth Thornhill went missing six months ago. According to the evidence, she ran off with another man, so the Met closed the case. However, Slater’s enquiries soon find inconsistencies in the original investigation, and after a near-fatal encounter with a London bus, he realises the stakes are far higher than he imagined.

An unlikely ally, in the form of fellow scapegoat DS Norman Norman, helps him uncover disturbing connections between the missing woman, a Chinese businessman, a glossy magazine, an online escort agency, a top London banker and senior officers from London’s Serious Crime Unit. The two uncover a mire of corruption, blackmail, deception and possibly the most cunning murder ever seen. The evidence stacks up against one particular suspect and Slater and Norman close in, but as with most things in Slater’s life, nothing is ever simple.

 

Book 2: Just A Coincidence

 

In the sleepy Hampshire town of Tinton, major crime is rare, and DS Slater and colleague Norman Norman find themselves with nothing to investigate except a flasher and an illiterate counterfeiter. Things are so quiet Slater even arranges to go on his long-awaited date with bombshell waitress Jelena.

But things can change in a matter of seconds, and a dog walker’s discovery of a battered body near a local woodland sends Slater and Norman hurrying to the scene. Before they know it, they have three dead bodies on their hands, and the victims are all related. But with 15 years between the murders, is this just a bizarre coincidence, or could the murders be linked? With tensions rising within their close-knit team, can Slater and Norman keep it together to solve their latest mystery?

 

Book 3: Florence

When a little old man is found dead in his home, DS Dave Slater assumes he was simply the victim of a tragic accident. He lived alone, after all, and didn’t seem to have any living relatives. But after some strange occurrences at the old man’s home, Slater finds himself probing deeper. He soon discovers that someone seems to be looking for something, but what was the lonely old man hiding, and why is someone so desperate to find it?

And then there’s Florence, a ghost-like figure who is occasionally spotted around town in the early hours of the morning. Slater can’t shake off the feeling she is linked, somehow. But how, and why?

 

Book 4: The Wrong Man

When Diana Woods is found stabbed to death in her kitchen, DS Slater and DS Norman Norman are plunged into another major investigation. The finger of suspicion quickly points at Diana’s estranged husband, Ian, a bully who regularly abused his wife. But as Slater learns more, he begins to wonder if everything is as it seems. When a new suspect appears on the scene, it seems that Slater’s instincts were right. But the evidence seems just a bit too convenient, and Slater and Norman have to face the possibility that their suspect is being framed, and they could be back to square one.
 

If you like your crime with a lighter touch, this is a refreshing, entertaining mix that never takes itself too seriously. Grab your copy today and get 4 books for the price of2!

 

 

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Last night I finished Witch Wood; much better than The 39 Steps if I may say so. Being a little tired of Scottish writers I started a book dh has from the Library: The Best of Richard Matheson, a collection of 1950's short stories by one of the Twilight Zone writers. Why oh why do I ever read any of dh's books? Just awful. "Nightmare at 20,000 Feet" was only bearable because I could imagine the protagonist as a young William Shatner. Fortunately the library told me to pick up my Essex read, Lady Audley's Secret, and I've abandoned Matheson for Braddon.

Also more reading of Iain Crichton Smith. some of which I almost understand. I think. Here's a not completely inaccessible piece:

At the Firth of Lorne

In the cold orange light we stared across
to Mull and Kerrera and far Tiree.
A setting sun emblazoned your bright knee
to a brilliant gold to match your hair's gold poise.

Nothing had changed: the world was as it was
a million years ago. The slaty stone
slept in its tinged and aboriginal iron.
The sky might flower a little, and the grass

perpetuate its sheep. But from the sea
the bare bleak islands rose, beyond the few
uneasy witticisms we let pursue
their desolate silences. There was no tree

nor other witness to the looks we gave
each other there, inhuman as if tolled
by some huge bell of iron and of gold,
I no great Adam and you no bright Eve.

 

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On 6/22/2018 at 7:14 AM, aggieamy said:

 

I see a ... goldfish, dog, bunny, hamster, and gnome?

@mumto2 Dd & I sighed over your beautiful, clever, creations (quilting is a wishlist skill for Dd) and, like Amys done,  we are trying to find what else you've sewn into that quilt.

 

@Violet Crown  Thank you!!  Off to try and hunt up Witch Wood ( our family of 4 are serious John Buchan appreciators.  The Richard Hannay, and, Sir Edward Leithen series).  

@Kareni  thanks for the links, especially the non-fiction one.   I'm only familiar with a handful of them, and since I'm always on the hunt for interesting non-fiction reads, here's a book seeking question for BaW ....

 Q: What are your most appreciated/ enjoyed/ favourite non-fiction reads to date?

And wondering if anyone here has read either of these two books Star Dust Falling ~ Jay Rayner, or,  Enemy Women Paulette Jiles?

@aggieamy   I try not to 'covet'  ? the library/Overdrive lending range many of you have,  our library doesn't have any, zero, Anthony Trollop's title for loan. 

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11 minutes ago, tuesdayschild said:

@Kareni  thanks for the links, especially the non-fiction one. 

You are quite welcome, tuesdayschild.

12 minutes ago, tuesdayschild said:

 Q: What are your most appreciated/ enjoyed/ favourite  non-fiction reads to date? 

Much appreciated here is Susan Wise Bauer's The Well-Trained Mind.

Non-fiction I've enjoyed:

Bill Bryson's  The Mother Tongue: English and How it Got that Way 

Classic Feynman: All the Adventures of a Curious Character which is a compilation of two of Richard Feynman's earlier books -- "Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!" and "What Do You Care What Other People Think?".  The edition I've linked is wonderful because it includes a CD of Richard Feynman telling some great stories of his time at Los Alamos.

Quirkology: How We Discover the Big Truths in Small Things by Richard Wiseman ~ this generated some interesting dinner table conversation.

Fun non-fiction to browse for a variety of ages:

(yucky cover) ~ Oh, Yuck!: The Encyclopedia of Everything Nasty  by Joy Masoff

Elements: A Visual Exploration of Every Known Atom in the Universe  by Theodore Gray

What If?: Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions   and  Thing Explainer: Complicated Stuff in Simple Words   by Randall Munroe

Regards,
Kareni

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Today I finished the short science fiction novella Time Was  by Ian McDonald.  It was a quick read.  Generally I don't notice writing style, but I read a segment to my husband after describing it as poetic.  The book left me going "hmmm." 

"Ian McDonald weaves a love story across an endless expanse with his science fiction novella Time Was

A love story stitched across time and war, shaped by the power of books, and ultimately destroyed by it.

In the heart of World War II, Tom and Ben became lovers. Brought together by a secret project designed to hide British targets from German radar, the two found a love that could not be revealed. When the project went wrong, Tom and Ben vanished into nothingness, presumed dead. Their bodies were never found.

Now the two are lost in time, hunting each other across decades, leaving clues in books of poetry and trying to make their desperate timelines overlap."


The text that I made blue above is not included in the blurb on my book.  I wonder why/when it was added.  I prefer its absence.

Having just read Kindred, another time travel story, I was amused to find one common feature in this book.

Regards,
Kareni

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4 hours ago, tuesdayschild said:

@Kareni  thanks for the links, especially the non-fiction one.   I'm only familiar with a handful of them, and since I'm always on the hunt for interesting non-fiction reads, here's a book seeking question for BaW ....

 Q: What are your most appreciated/ enjoyed/ favourite non-fiction reads to date?


Since you ask... ?

I seem to really like Charles Mann's books - I think my favorite is 1491, followed by The Wizard and the Prophet, and then 1493.

I loved Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World by Jack Weatherford, Lost to the West by Lars Brownworth, The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson, Notes on a Foreign Country by Suzy Hansen, Evicted by Matthew Desmond, and Killers of the Flower Moon by David Grann.

On a more medical bent, I really liked The Wild Life of Our Bodies by Rob Dunn, The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down (about a Hmong girl with epilepsy) by Anne Fadiman, The Ghost Map (about cholera in Victorian London) by Steven Johnson, and The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot.

About language, I loved The Language Instinct by Stephen Pinker and Word by Word by Kory Stamper.

Biography and autobiography/memoirs - I loved Born a Crime by Trevor Noah (listen to this one on audio), Romantic Outlaws by Charlotte Gordon, Lab Girl by Hope Jahren, Wild Swans by Jung Chang, Oblivion by Hector Abad Faciolince, Waiting for Snow In Havana by Carlos Eire, Becoming Laura Ingalls Wilder by John Miller, The Real James Herriot by Jim Wight, Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates

Adventure/challenge - Endurance (Shakleton) by Alfred Lansing, River of Doubt by Candice Millard, Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer, Boys in the Boat by Daniel James Brown.

And Radium Girls, Girls of Atomic City, and Hidden Figures (though I know a lot of people didn't like the book as much as the movie).

 

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Mumto2 - the quilts are gorgeous! :)

Negin - Love the Italy pics!

And Trollope - somehow I have never read anything by him.  That's apparently a gross oversight on my part... I think I'm mostly familiar with the name from PBS/BBC miniseries, though I don't think I've even watched any of the ones made from his stuff?

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14 hours ago, Matryoshka said:

And Trollope - somehow I have never read anything by him.  That's apparently a gross oversight on my part... I think I'm mostly familiar with the name from PBS/BBC miniseries, though I don't think I've even watched any of the ones made from his stuff?

I have Trollope’s He Knew He Was Right scheduled for Week 28 (Devon). If anyone wants to join in.

ETA: I see the BBC filmed this one too.

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Speaking of Anthony Trollope, I found the Chronicles of Barsetshire on Amazon. All six novels in one volume on kindle for .99 cents.  My FIL loves to talk about books with me and has been encouraging me to read Trollope.  He mainly reads books set in 17th and 18th century and always has interesting things to say about different stories. 

Other finds which had me adding to my want list - 5 International Crime Novels to read in June as well as bookriot's Four Crime Novels for Armchair Travelers.

 

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On 6/21/2018 at 12:19 PM, Kareni said:

 

On 6/22/2018 at 7:10 AM, mumto2 said:

For Susan Wittig Albert fans https://www.mysterypartners.com/. In The Cottage Tales of Beatrix Potter section there are recipes if you click on the individual books.

 

On 6/22/2018 at 10:16 AM, Kareni said:

Some currently free books for Kindle readers ~

The Midnight Land: Part One: The Flight (The Zemnian Series Book 1)  by E.P. Clark

"A bold beginning to a series that explores gender, empathy, and the frozen north"--Kirkus

time travel: Lock & Key  by Gordon Bonnet

genre bending: Murphy’s Luck   by Benjamin Laskin

contemporary romance:  King of Code   by CD Reiss

Regards,
Kareni

 

On 6/22/2018 at 10:49 AM, Penguin said:

I recently started listening to The History of English Podcast.  And there are 112 episodes, so I will have it to listen to for a LONG time! It is so interesting - provided that you are the sort of person who enjoys a good 20 minutes on the historical trajectory of one particular sound change. And I think that some of you are that sort of person, so that is why I am recommending it here ? 

http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/

 

On 6/22/2018 at 11:31 AM, LuvToRead said:

 

23 hours ago, Kareni said:

 

Wow!  Thank you for all the awesome links. 

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On 6/21/2018 at 12:12 PM, mumto2 said:

Thanks guys!  I just hope the girl receiving it enjoys it!  I just washed and dried it to make sure it can stand up to harder use then I normally give my quilts.  Came through great!  Btw, hedgehogs made it through the washing machine test too.  

I am back trying to finish my hand quilting project’s top.  Some of you have seen it in various stages but this is where I am now, one corner to go.  It’s sort of like a puzzle, all my pieces are cut out and read to go in ziplock bags.  I want to try and get it done for the horticultural show in September but not sure if I am up for spending the summer under that quilt finishing it.  Dh recently purchased some fun patterns for me to try by the same designer as the hedgehogs.  They are distracting me horribly so I may get the top completed and go on to do some other projects.  

 

14715867-5AF8-4B00-8B5F-AF6557EF1A6E.jpeg

Love the colors!  Makes me want to get creative! 

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On 6/17/2018 at 6:31 PM, Robin M said:

 Our Brit Trip armchair travels are taking us to Suffolk this week. Suffolk has been the home to many noted British artists and composers – Thomas GainsboroughJohn Constable, and Benjamin Britten.

Rabbit trails: Rendlesham Forest Incident (The UK’s Roswell),  Mid-Suffolk Light Railway,  Kentwell Hall, and  House in the Clouds

Don’t forget the Sutton Hoo ship burial! I read a book about the Anglo-Saxon archeological record for my Suffolk BritTrip read, and next week I get to see all the stuff! I am so excited.

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