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When you don’t like a name given to a new baby close to you


Quill
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On 6/6/2018 at 5:42 PM, Alice said:

 

I went to a church once and there was a family in the bulletin with the kids: Matthew, Mark, Luke and....

 

 

Tiffany. 

 

 

I had a pastor with 3 brothers, Matthew, Mark, and John. His name as the third son... Greg. Why? His last name was Luke. Why would you do that if you knew you couldn't follow through?

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On 6/7/2018 at 3:53 PM, SquirrellyMama said:

Nope,  It is Desstinniee. Drives me NUTS! Sweet girl, though.

 

 

DYING! I'm sorry, it is sad, but it's funny too!

 

On 6/7/2018 at 9:05 PM, Quill said:

 

And I just cannot reveal the new baby’s name after I’ve been somewhat ungracious about it. I am committed to liking it enough, if only from the perspective of knowing this name is, to my niece and her husband, the very best, most perfect name. So, that is something. 

 

Definitely don't share here. You wouldn't want this popping up if they googled their kid's name. ?

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3 minutes ago, ThisIsTheDay said:

Definitely don't share here. You wouldn't want this popping up if they googled their kid's name. ?

 

This.  But feel free to DM it to those of us who've expressed interest (me and everyone who likes this!)

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22 minutes ago, beckyjo said:

I had a pastor with 3 brothers, Matthew, Mark, and John. His name as the third son... Greg. Why? His last name was Luke. Why would you do that if you knew you couldn't follow through?

Or at least go with Paul or David or something. But Greg?

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8 hours ago, freesia said:

The one I knew was na-vay-uh

Yes, This is how it is pronounced. 

Either 

ne-vay-uh (short e sound), na-vay-uh or nuh-vay-uh  (very slight variation on the first syllable but all are accepted pronunciations).  Always 3 syllables. 

 

Never like the lotion Ni-vee-ah or ni-veah

 

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8 hours ago, Quill said:

The name Delilah, along with the trendier Lyla does have a beautiful, current sound. I think many people are just deciding the sound of it means more to them than the connotation of the Biblical Delilah. 

 

My mind doesn't go to the biblical story but that's probably because I don't really think about Bible stories unless someone points them out to me. However, when I hear the name I can hear Tom Jones singing, "Why, why, why, Delilah". Also, Rhiannon was a popular baby name around the time ds was born (maybe it still is, I don't know) and when I hear that name I hear Stevie Nicks singing the Fleetwood Mac song of the same name. 

Ds doesn't have a weird name, but it's old fashioned and uncommon today. I named him after my dad, who died when I was 14. We did give him a popular middle name (Michael) so that when he was older he'd have the option to be called something more common. He doesn't mind his first name though so he's never felt the need to go by his middle name.

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17 hours ago, Carrie12345 said:

After my first, I didn't announce names until kids were born. 

Dss and ddil have kept their kids names to themselves because her mother doesn't hesitate to give her opinion about every name on their list. Oldest grandson actually ended up with a name they hadn't picked. When he was born they decided he just looked like he should have that name so they dropped their planned name and gave him the one he has now.  She's pregnant with her third and last, and we have no idea what names they're even considering. It's easier that way, I think. Once the baby is born and they announce a name, everyone just has to accept it. 

On 6/6/2018 at 12:19 PM, Ravin said:

 

12 is a common age for a kid to assert themselves, and that's a legit way to do so. I've known many people who dropped a childhood nickname as they moved into their teens...then there's my DD, who has grown more adamant about USING a nickname that I personally detest. It's her name, though, she can do as she likes with it. So can you. Even in middle age, changing it is always an option--just a bit more hassle than before you're launched.

There wasn't much I could do with Kathleen. Kathy, Kate, Katie, Kat. When I was in middle school I decided Kathy was too boring (and there were so many of us around back then - it was very common) so I started spelling it Kathie. In high school I dropped the e, and spelled it Kathi. As an adult I went back to Kathy. I can tell at what point in my life I met someone (if I still keep in touch), based on how they spell my boring name. I don't have a middle name so I never had the option of being called by my middle name. 

My dad was a junior who went by Jay. Apparently people called him Junior, then J.R., then eventually just J. He picked up on that last one and went by Jay. That's not the name I gave ds though I would have liked to. My stepson is Jason and he used to go by Jay, so it would have been weird to have both of our boys called Jay. Instead I gave ds my dad's given name of Dennis. Although I knew it was an old fashioned name, I thought no one would be old enough to connect it with Dennis the Menace. How could I have known there'd be a remake movie when he was a kid? And the worst part is he had blonde hair, a cowlick, and the same rather curious personality. Fortunately only a few kids called him Dennis the Menace and when he didn't react they quickly got tired of it. 

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19 hours ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

Ivan the terrible was the grandson of Ivan the great.  I guess he didn't follow in grandpa's footsteps? 

I kind of like the name now that I think of it this way. When he's being a good little boy you call him Ivan the Great. When he's driving you up the wall you call him Ivan the terrible, lol. 

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12 hours ago, Lady Florida. said:

 

There wasn't much I could do with Kathleen. Kathy, Kate, Katie, Kat. When I was in middle school I decided Kathy was too boring (and there were so many of us around back then - it was very common) so I started spelling it Kathie. In high school I dropped the e, and spelled it Kathi. As an adult I went back to Kathy. I can tell at what point in my life I met someone (if I still keep in touch), based on how they spell my boring name. I don't have a middle name so I never had the option of being called by my middle name. 

 

I love the name Kathleen!!!! I wanted to name my youngest that, but DH wouldn't. My mom is Kathleen and was Kashie as a kid and then Kathy and now just Kathleen. Same as you, you can tell when people met her based on which they use. Her parents used to call her Kashie, now just one of her sisters does, and not all the time. I miss hearing it. My grandmother (her mom) was also Kathleen but went by Kay. My mom was going to name me Kathleen as well, but knew she wanted to call me Katie so just used Katie in the end. (teachers never believed it wasn't a nickname, sigh)

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13 hours ago, Tap said:

Yes, This is how it is pronounced. 

Either 

ne-vay-uh (short e sound), na-vay-uh or nuh-vay-uh  (very slight variation on the first syllable but all are accepted pronunciations).  Always 3 syllables. 

Never like the lotion Ni-vee-ah or ni-veah

 

LOL, since Nivea is a German brand, I first encountered it in Germany, and I speak German, I pronounce it more like they do in German - Ni-vay-uh, accent on the second syllable.  So for me, it is kinda like the lotion - the first syllables just a bit different.  I actually had no idea how Americans would pronounce Nivea...  I would've guessed the first of your two options (but with the accent on the first syllable??).

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3 minutes ago, Matryoshka said:

 

LOL, since Nivea is a German brand, I first encountered it in Germany, and I speak German, I pronounce it more like they do in German - Ni-vay-uh, accent on the second syllable.  So for me, it is kinda like the lotion - the first syllables just a bit different.  I actually had no idea how Americans would pronounce Nivea...  I would've guessed the first of your two options (but with the accent on the first syllable??).

I pronounce it like you. But I too first heard it overseas. 

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This reminds me of the Strange Name Movie. It's a doc on Netflix.

I was surprised my son and daughter in law told me the name they were considering since they aren't even pregnant yet just thinking about it. But I would never give an opinion because it can be so hard to find a name both parents can agree on.

My mom's name starts with "Sh" and she felt the need to name my sister and I "Sh" names as well. Which is annoying since no one ever calls us the right name and I now answer to any variation.

 

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On 6/9/2018 at 11:24 AM, Ktgrok said:

I love the name Kathleen!!!! I wanted to name my youngest that, but DH wouldn't. My mom is Kathleen and was Kashie as a kid and then Kathy and now just Kathleen. Same as you, you can tell when people met her based on which they use. Her parents used to call her Kashie, now just one of her sisters does, and not all the time. I miss hearing it. My grandmother (her mom) was also Kathleen but went by Kay. My mom was going to name me Kathleen as well, but knew she wanted to call me Katie so just used Katie in the end. (teachers never believed it wasn't a nickname, sigh)

 

This reminds me of my maternal grandma's nickname growing up. She was a Norma Jean, which was an incredibly plain name common in her generation...I remember cracking up the first time we got together with her and her younger sister at the same time and her sister called her Norm. That was so funny to me (I was around 12 or 13)!

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11 minutes ago, Ravin said:

 

This reminds me of my maternal grandma's nickname growing up. She was a Norma Jean, which was an incredibly plain name common in her generation...I remember cracking up the first time we got together with her and her younger sister at the same time and her sister called her Norm. That was so funny to me (I was around 12 or 13)!

If you watch enough seasons of the Andy Griffith show Barnie starts calling Andy "Ange" like short for Angela. 

Of course, I have twin uncles named Kim and Kerry because my Grandmother had already had 3 boys and was done picking boy names. (she fully admits this) At least she was talked into Kerry and not Carrie. 

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48 minutes ago, Scarlett said:

I understand people keeping the name a secret, but I gotta tell ya there is value in getting others to help you 'hear' things you might not otherwise.  Like my co worker who named her son 'Michael Douglas'.  Ugh.  

That’s what I think, too. I knew two different people who thought they were coming up with a creative made-up name who were...not really doing that. One wanted to name her girl “Ky-Anne.” Another thought she was doing a variation of “Cameron” and was failing to notice it was Kamera. Like, a Kodak moment camera. 

My sister was planning to use Steven Tyler, until a friend pointed out that that was a celebrity name. 

Then there is the matter of spelling. My mother knew someone from church who decided to name her dd “Danielle,” after hearing my name, but she was in the hospital when she decided this and she and the nurse, not knowing how the name would be spellled, came up with the phonetic-yet-hideous “Danyell.” That poor girl. And there was the case I have mentioned here before, where a client at the law firm was changing her dd’s spelling legally because, while trying to spell, “Monique” managed to write it as “Monquie.” A little syntax issue there. I can just imagine her friend telling her, “Ummm, that does not say Monique...” 

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1 hour ago, Ktgrok said:

 Of course, I have twin uncles named Kim and Kerry because my Grandmother had already had 3 boys and was done picking boy names. (she fully admits this) At least she was talked into Kerry and not Carrie. 

I know a family with five boys and they all have names that could be girl names - Kelly, Tracy, Robin, etc. I've always been interested to know why they chose those names, but it's not something you can really ask...

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1 hour ago, Selkie said:

I know a family with five boys and they all have names that could be girl names - Kelly, Tracy, Robin, etc. I've always been interested to know why they chose those names, but it's not something you can really ask...

Well, obviously I cannot speak for someone else, but my DH is a Kelly and he has a brother named Cary. He is one of six kids. 

I could not say specifically what was in my IL’s heads when they named their kids, but I know, other than the eldest, who is the III, MIL wanted the kids to have less common names. When dh was named (1963), they probably had not especially noticed that Kelly was becoming popular for girl babies. (Also, names rose to awareness a lot more slowly then; it is super-fast now due to internet and media.) They just figured, I think, that Kelly was a perfectly nice, Irish name; same thing when Cary came along. 

Names do still get co-opted from male to female, by people looking to pick an edgy or androgynous name for their girls. It can easily go that way with any name. When I chose Mason for my youngest, a friend “warned” me that she knew of someone who just gave that name to her baby girl. So, I guess, if I think about the name as it’s sounds only, I can easily see someone choosing that for a girl. I don’t think it is ripe to happen now, because that name shot to popularity (for boys) in my region and once it gets well-established, it is less likely to become a name usually given to girls. But I can imagine it. 

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31 minutes ago, Quill said:

Well, obviously I cannot speak for someone else, but my DH is a Kelly and he has a brother named Cary. He is one of six kids. 

I could not say specifically what was in my IL’s heads when they named their kids, but I know, other than the eldest, who is the III, MIL wanted the kids to have less common names. When dh was named (1963), they probably had not especially noticed that Kelly was becoming popular for girl babies. (Also, names rose to awareness a lot more slowly then; it is super-fast now due to internet and media.) They just figured, I think, that Kelly was a perfectly nice, Irish name; same thing when Cary came along. 

Names do still get co-opted from male to female, by people looking to pick an edgy or androgynous name for their girls. It can easily go that way with any name. When I chose Mason for my youngest, a friend “warned” me that she knew of someone who just gave that name to her baby girl. So, I guess, if I think about the name as it’s sounds only, I can easily see someone choosing that for a girl. I don’t think it is ripe to happen now, because that name shot to popularity (for boys) in my region and once it gets well-established, it is less likely to become a name usually given to girls. But I can imagine it. 

A name that  wouldn't be used by girls was top priority for us,.  I am fairly confident it won't be.  In 18 years I have never heard it used for a girl.  Think--Wild West gun slinger......but  a similar name-Wyatt - I just saw used for a girl the other day.  Really there is no way to ever know for sure.  

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I have a hunch that slightly androgynous male names are going to be a thing in a decade or so. Names have migrated from male to female for ages, but I think people are finally chill enough about masculinity that some may be allowed to migrate the other way.

My mother almost named me a very feminine name with another male name as my middle name (I have one already) but she was going to call me by the male name. She changed her mind. It's an old family name... I gave ds that name instead, but it's funny that it was one of the big contenders to be my own name.

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32 minutes ago, Farrar said:

I have a hunch that slightly androgynous male names are going to be a thing in a decade or so. Names have migrated from male to female for ages, but I think people are finally chill enough about masculinity that some may be allowed to migrate the other way.

My mother almost named me a very feminine name with another male name as my middle name (I have one already) but she was going to call me by the male name. She changed her mind. It's an old family name... I gave ds that name instead, but it's funny that it was one of the big contenders to be my own name.

One of my favorite names is Natalie Scott Last name.  Her dads name was Scott.  

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