Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

Sign in to follow this  
Melissa in Australia

oral sensory help please cross posted

Recommended Posts

I have one twin who seem to need lots of oral sensory input. He lickes everything. . I just recently took him to Melbourne for a dr appointment at the children's hospital. he was running his hands over toilet seats and licking them, running hands over the top of the sanitary disposal bins and licking them. it is so gross,he does it as a very quick motion. if you are not watching very closely you wouldn't see him lick his hand. We have to go back to the children's hospital for his surgery at the end of this week. I need helpful suggestions on what I can do.

We have been telling him to not lick things for a long time. it doesn't make any difference. we have tried sensory chew  necklaces etc. I don't think he is consciously aware that he licks everything

His licking things is not so bad at home, probably because he has already licked everything here.

 What can I do short of carrying a bleach bottle and cleaning/disinfecting everything in front of him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try a mouth guard meant to keep you from grinding your teeth, one of the small over the counter ones. It gives sensory input and gives him something to lick inside his mouth (unlike a chew necklace, it's already in his mouth when the urge hits. Makes it a little harder to lick other things unobtrusively. 

I don't know if you can get the same things, but Grind No More inserts are about $1 each here, and meant to last 3-5 days. $30 or so gets you an adjustable one meant to last six months or more. If he doesn't grind or chew, they will last longer. The adjustable ones let you click it a bit larger or smaller, but neither require boiling and then biting to make an impression. They are pretty much ready to go. 

Alternatley, something to keep his hands busy, like a fidget toy? Something biggish to occupy two hands, maybe. Gloves might serve as a reminder, fuzzy ones don't seem nice to lick. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My sympathies go out to you. 

Does he know how to play Simon Says?  Playing Simon Says was my secret weapon when using public restrooms with little kids. I was able to control their movements, prevent them from peeking under stalls and unlocking the door. (Also helpful for privacy, “SS, close your eyes” lol)  I probably sounded like a crazy lady in the restroom stall, but it was effective.

Obviously wouldn’t work before surgery, but in other public situations would giving him a lollipop, or something he *could* lick help?  I have even seem some with calming ingredients such as chamomile.

When my kids have had surgery, they have been given some medicine upon intake or before the IV was inserted to help calm them.  Perhaps you could request this?  Surgery day is always difficult — little tummies are hungry, mommies are stressed, and behaviors are amplified. 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just stumbled upon this website that has a wealth of sensory activities. They have free downloads and also things available for purchase. I downloaded the free sensory activities and there is a ton of things you can try with kids that are sensory-seeking. Maybe this will help.

https://www.mymundaneandmiraculouslife.com/

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, bibliophile said:

My sympathies go out to you. 

Does he know how to play Simon Says?  Playing Simon Says was my secret weapon when using public restrooms with little kids. I was able to control their movements, prevent them from peeking under stalls and unlocking the door. (Also helpful for privacy, “SS, close your eyes” lol)  I probably sounded like a crazy lady in the restroom stall, but it was effective.

Obviously wouldn’t work before surgery, but in other public situations would giving him a lollipop, or something he *could* lick help?  I have even seem some with calming ingredients such as chamomile.

When my kids have had surgery, they have been given some medicine upon intake or before the IV was inserted to help calm them.  Perhaps you could request this?  Surgery day is always difficult — little tummies are hungry, mommies are stressed, and behaviors are amplified. 

 

 

He has compromised teeth so we avoid lollipops etc as he has RAD presented as PTS triggered by needles. the longer we can avoid having fillings the better for him. He already has a bad tooth that the dentist just cleaned then painted over to try and get a little more time out of as it is a baby tooth. 

 He is going to be given gas and made very drowsy before surgery because of his PTS.

8 hours ago, bibliophile said:

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, newhsmom said:

I just stumbled upon this website that has a wealth of sensory activities. They have free downloads and also things available for purchase. I downloaded the free sensory activities and there is a ton of things you can try with kids that are sensory-seeking. Maybe this will help.

https://www.mymundaneandmiraculouslife.com/

 

 

thank you very much

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wwe tried sugar free chewing gum today. While he didn't lick his hand while he had it in his mouth he hated having it. asking me every few seconds if he could spit it out yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Were the chews bought specifically for licking or ones you had already? DD9 licks, though not nearly as much as it sounds like your DS does. She will be fine some days and other days she just wants to lick. We already had necklaces for chewing but she didn't want to lick those. We got her a new one with a long flat side (it looks like a 2x10 lego) so there was a specific surface for her to lick. She named it her "lickie". She doesn't love it, but she will use it. This seems to work for her since her need to lick is not constant. She also seems completely aware, it's not subconscious for her. I do have to remind her a lot, though. If we're out for the day I'll have her wear it and I will just say "lickie" if she starts licking to remind her to use her lego necklace. She licks more when her engine is high so I also try to help bring her down. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have one like that.  We didn’t take away the pacifier and made sure it was in her mouth in public even at age four to prevent the random licking.  She still uses the pacifier at home at 13.  She hates gum but likes crunchy foods. That helped some.  Drinking thick liquids through a straw?  Shrugging and thinking what a great immune system they’re getting?  (Yeah, I couldn’t really do that at a hospital.)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

we are doing the thick liquids through a straw.

 He is 7 1/2

when he came to live with us  at 3 1/2 he was not using a pacifier - I am reluctant to start one now. though if I knew it would help I could get one and shove it in his mouth just as we walk into the public toilets  :-)... Hmm Maybe I will do just that. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone for the suggestions

spoke to the twins Psycologest/playtheripist today

She said that the trip to Melbourne in 2 days is too quick to start training strategies - to glove him up before entering the toilets - as he will not like the texture/taste of the gloves he will not lick.( why didn't I think of that ) She will work on long term strategies for the future.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...