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My DIL-to-be asked me if I had any unique or unusual wedding gift ideas they could add to their registry.   Someone told her she should have at least 150 items on her list and I think it's got them stumped.  She and my son already both have apartments which they will be combining so normal things like pots and pans and cutlery are already covered.  She's already got a Kitchen Aid and other "normal" things on her registry.  We were wracking our brains today trying to think of things people might not consider (we thought of spice sets - yay).  

I thought I'd come to the hive, since neat ideas abound with this group

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Some random ideas:

Door mats
Full length mirror
Shower curtain & rings
Artwork for walls
cutting boards in various sizes
extension cord (we seem to buy another one every couple of months)
flashlights (one for every room)
fire-proof box
fire extinguisher
food scale
 

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Really good kitchen floor mats--not the Costco knock offs, but the save your back ones.  Available at Williams Sonoma now, although I got mine at an obscure one of little kitchen store called Harte of the Kitchen in Twain Harte, CA.

Lemon squeezer from Cost Plus World Market--I've tried 3 kinds, and theirs are the best.  Bright cheerful yellow, too.

Coffee grinder if they don't have one already.

Microplane graters and shredders.

I love my olive wood salt pinch pot.  I felt it was overpriced, but someone gave me a gift card...https://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/olive-wood-salt-keeper/

Do they have a grill basket?  I love my Pampered Chef one.  It is stainless steel, and the handle is detachable so it never has to heat up, plus you can put the basket of food into a Weber and then take of the handle to close the lid of the Weber.

Springerle molds are beautiful to use and to display.

Ice cream maker!

Belgian waffle maker!

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On dds registry I put some items that aren't too unusual, but maybe worth considering.

  • A vacuum (we put an upright but a Roomba or Scooba would be nice)
  • fire extinguisher
  • Really good oven mitts
  • Wish I could put a thermopop thermometer on the registry, but they aren't for sale on Amazon. Went with the Lavaworks Javelin Pro instead
  • Sous Vide
  • Vacuum sealer (for sous Vide)
  • Step Stool
  • Nice iron
  • A friend put a sound system on her registry so they could get the discount after the fact lol
  • Blankets, sheets, pillows
  • Nice Humidifier
  • Battery Charger for AA< AAA etc
  • BBQ accessories like Smoker box, grill brushes
  • Silpats (silicone pan liners)

 

If the register on Amazon, I wonder if you add other gift cards to restaurants or activities ( like a spa visit )on the registry.

Or maybe an e-reader?

If they register at an eclectic store like World Market the can do a registry there. Then put on an area rug, small furniture like end tables, curtains, decor etc.

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2 hours ago, PrincessMommy said:

My DIL-to-be asked me if I had any unique or unusual wedding gift ideas they could add to their registry.  Someone told her she should have at least 150 items on her list and I think it's freaking her out a little.  She and my son already both have apartments which they will be combining so normal things like pots and pans and cutlery are already covered.  She's already got a Kitchen Aid and other "normal" things on her registry.  We were wracking our brains today trying to think of things people might not consider (we thought of spice sets - yay).  

I thought I'd come to the hive, since neat ideas abound with this group

 

Did you agree with that? That sounds way over the top to me. 

More and more people are decluttering/downsizing. I don't think it's weird to not want a long list. 

I once gifted a decorative plate with family crests (bride & groom). I don't know if they'd like anything with their last name or such on it. Personalized items. Monogrammed towels, cutting board, etc. But if they already own those things and don't need new ones, then it's not important to add them. 

So often people just buy whatever they want, anyway. I wouldn't put too much stock into a registry. You can put plates and towels on the registry and get two toasters. Who knows. 

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Do they have really good pots and pans? I would recommend registering for high quality items to replace basic ones.  If they know where they are living next they could register for things specific to the new home - curtains, rugs, new shower curtain etc.  Also, don't be afraid to put big ticket items on.  While they might not get it, it's very common for people to join together aand gift items like that.  My mom, sisters and I usually do something like that.  

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7 hours ago, heartlikealion said:

 

Did you agree with that? That sounds way over the top to me. 

More and more people are decluttering/downsizing. I don't think it's weird to not want a long list. 

I once gifted a decorative plate with family crests (bride & groom). I don't know if they'd like anything with their last name or such on it. Personalized items. Monogrammed towels, cutting board, etc. But if they already own those things and don't need new ones, then it's not important to add them. 

So often people just buy whatever they want, anyway. I wouldn't put too much stock into a registry. You can put plates and towels on the registry and get two toasters. Who knows. 

I told her it sounded like a lot of gifts.  I also told her a lot of people like to give money as a gift. 

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Just because someone else said 150 items doesn't mean they need to list 150 items.  That said, if they're inviting 150 people and they're getting 150 gifts, they might as well be gifts that they'd like!  

How about unique kitchen tools? (Garlic press, small hand lemon/lime juicer, zester, etc.)

Camping supplies?

BBQ supplies?

Trays for eating on when you have a crowd and are sitting in different areas of the house, or when food is being served in a buffet line?

Board games?

Travel supplies?

 

 

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One reason for registering a large number of items is that a fair number of them should be smaller, more inexpensive items. Many people will give money, but some people love to buy an actual gift but can't spend much money. I would have a good selection of items under $25. A lot of older people in particular are embarrassed to give $20, and feel much better about a pretty gift box containing washcloths. ANd you really can't have too many towels in your life, just stick them in a box until you need them. 

On Amazon wish lists, you can add notes like "any brand will do!" and such. I'm not sure about their registries or other registries. 

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When my husband and I got married, we had each lived on our own for quite a while.  And we both liked to cook.  Combining our mustards, for instance, created quite an extensive collection.

So I thought we should register for fine china, because we had all the everyday stuff already.  (We also registered for nice kitchen stuff at Williams Sonoma.)  (We each had kind of junky kitchen stuff, mostly.)  We picked out a really nice pattern that we both loved. 

Before that, I had always thought that getting something off the registry was the last refuge of lazy gift givers, who couldn't be bothered to figure out the perfect gift on their own.  But once we went through this, I realized how much I loved it when people gave us some of that china.  And I've always bought off of registries ever since.  So I do agree that it's good to have a big one, with a variety of price points for sure. 

BTW, at the time silver was pretty expensive, but my mom pointed out that china breaks in earthquakes and windstorms, or when dropped, but silver lasts.  So we registered for that, too, which I had not intended to do as I thought it was pretentious.  We have really enjoyed it over the years though.  We did not get very much for our wedding, but for years afterwards we and others hunted for it in antique shows and such, and so we ended up with a really nice collection.  The older patterns have lots of unusual pieces, like salt spoons and demitasse spoons and jelly knives that are kind of fun.

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49 minutes ago, Carol in Cal. said:

When my husband and I got married, we had each lived on our own for quite a while.  And we both liked to cook.  Combining our mustards, for instance, created quite an extensive collection.

So I thought we should register for fine china, because we had all the everyday stuff already.  (We also registered for nice kitchen stuff at Williams Sonoma.)  (We each had kind of junky kitchen stuff, mostly.)  We picked out a really nice pattern that we both loved. 

Before that, I had always thought that getting something off the registry was the last refuge of lazy gift givers, who couldn't be bothered to figure out the perfect gift on their own.  But once we went through this, I realized how much I loved it when people gave us some of that china.  And I've always bought off of registries ever since.  So I do agree that it's good to have a big one, with a variety of price points for sure. 

BTW, at the time silver was pretty expensive, but my mom pointed out that china breaks in earthquakes and windstorms, or when dropped, but silver lasts.  So we registered for that, too, which I had not intended to do as I thought it was pretentious.  We have really enjoyed it over the years though.  We did not get very much for our wedding, but for years afterwards we and others hunted for it in antique shows and such, and so we ended up with a really nice collection.  The older patterns have lots of unusual pieces, like salt spoons and demitasse spoons and jelly knives that are kind of fun.

 

We were in a similar position, so we registered only for fine china, everyday dishes (but still a Wedgwood pattern--nicer than the everyday dishes we each brought into the marriage) and silver.  My dad gave me all of the silver, and I do love it.  I ended up with tons of the china, and I use it several times a year.  China is really good because there are pieces available in a wide price range.

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I do think 150 gives people  a lot of choices. It really saves the couple from having to take back things they don't need or want.  It's nice if they receive what they need that will help launch their new life together.  Registering at a nice department store or Pottery Barn and also somewhere like Target gives a broader range of gifts too.  

I agree with above poster about silver.  We have used this way more often than china.  

I got 2 vases that I did not register for and honestly was a bit perplexed about receiving them.  I reality I end up using them quite often and am so glad I have them.

I also got some very practical gifts and those were fantastic too.

I love buying wedding presents!  I love registry's too. It feels like I get to share in their joy!  It's an exciting time in life!

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I know multiple people said fire extinguisher, but I just wanted to chime in that multiples are a good idea.  We have one in every kitchen and bathroom, the storm room, the laundry room, the garage, and one in the trunk of each car.  We've used them twice - once when we came upon a carload of college kids who'd crashed their car on an icy day and the engine was smoking, and once when a hairdryer caught fire and didn't go out when the plug got pulled.

Same goes for first aid kits.  A nice, big one is handy in the house, the garage, and each car.  More for camping or hiking or boating if they are interested in those things.

One of those cordless vacuums (doesn't have to be the expensive Dyson one, there are cheap knockoffs on Amazon) is really handy for sucking up spiders and dusting tall things like ceiling molding.

Silpats are super handy to have instead of parchment for baking.

Upgrading every kitchen item is nice.

Williams Sonoma Pantry line of daily china is totally worth it.

So are double sets of stainless flatware - Not so much when you only have two of you, but when you have a party or have kids and for some reason you go through all 12 spoons in one meal, having 24 spoons is super handy.

Ceramic knives are fantastic, and you want to ask for the cheaper ones because if you forget and put any sideways pressure on them they break.

Items to organize kitchen drawers and cabinets are nice - the knife slots you can add to drawers, etc.  Clear bins to sort everything in a fridge into categories and keep your la croix in one area.   Drawer organizers for a dresser. 

Seasonal decor items - Pastel  & floral kitchen towels and potholders for Spring, Patriotic ones for Summer, Autumn colors for Fall, Holiday or snowflake ones for Winter are all nice.

Multiple nice cleaning gloves - one set for the toilets, one set for other areas of the bathroom, one set for dishes.

Glass food storage containers - Snap Lock, Pyrex, mason jars. Pretty pantry food bins (glass for the anti chemical snobs, plastic for those planning on kids or if DH is a klutz).

An Instant Pot.  A Crockpot with the travel stuff - an insulating sleeve, the lock down no-spill lids to take to pot lucks. A buffet food warmer if they plan on having dinner parties.

A toaster oven

An air fryer

A stand mixer

One of those kits to put LED lights under cabinets if their kitchen doesn't have them or has florescent ones is a really nice upgrade.

A hammock.  Patio furniture for the back.  A bench for the front.

Gear for camping or tailgating.

Sports equipment.

You can also register for charities or honeymoons now.

 

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I'm going to hit the lower price range because I'm just that frugal:  

THIS--I was given one a few months ago and I use it ALL the time.  https://www.surlatable.com/product/PRO-2081776/?mrkgcl=890&mrkgadid=2972944853&affsrcid=AFF0005&utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=31533479&utm_term=All_Products_-_Sub-brand&product_id=2081776&creative=9317765840&device=c&matchtype=e

If they have hobbies, some of the underlying stuff for that hobby.  Like if anyone wanted to send me a bunch of SDI drives for my camera, I wouldn't say no.

Those $10-15 kitchen knives that come in pretty colors with a little sheath on them.  I keep one in each car, one in my picnic basket.  When my mother, the Knife Abuser, used to come to visit, I would hide all my good knives and put these out for her to use.  They are sharp enough and when she uses one to pry open a pickle jar, I'm only out $10.  :::scowl:::  :::smile:::

Olive oil / balsamic vinegar cruet set, one of the kind that doesn't DRIBBLE.

Candlesticks never go too far amiss in my house.  But I might be weird.  Or a boatload of nice beeswax candles.

Congratulations!

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What do they like to do together?  They could add some non-traditional options that go with their hobbies (a tent if they camp, life jackets if they like kayaking, a softball bat if they play on a team together, board games, etc).

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Gel mats for the kitchen floors

Do they camp? If so, there is an entire category open to them. We have friends who got married and combined households, but all of their camping equipment dated back to his scouting years and some was quite worn out and they needed a bigger tent, so they listed (and received) quite a bit of camping equipment. 

A grill and grill tools

patio/deck furniture and cushions

outdoor decorative string lights

cleaning supplies - good quality brooms, mops, buckets, etc. 

Are they apartment dwellers planning to move into a house soon? If so, then: rakes, blower, weed wacker, lawn mower, electric hedge trimmers, outdoor extension cords, wheelbarrow, garden tools

Christmas decorations such as artificial trees, garland, ornaments, mailbox decor

stationery -box of assorted greeting cards, monogrammed note cards, Christmas cards

 

 

 

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