Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

rose

Worn out - give me a kick in rear and get me to teach another 5yo to read

Recommended Posts

I'm a little worn out. I've got two highschoolers, a 6yo emerging reader, a 5.0 yo chopping at the bit to be taught, a delayed 4yo, an obnoxious 3yo, a 2yo and a baby. My two teenager were quite difficult to teach to read and my 6yo is showing his own challenges (still struggles to differentiate the short vowels from one another and can't consistently read cvc words or blends). My 5yo is so keen though to start learning. I'm just so daunted by the idea of teaching another child to read. I wanted to get 6yo done with before moving on but I just know that I can't wait much longer. I need some of that newbie zeal that we all started with. Any encouragement for me? Got any nice playful ways to do cvc practice?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the 5 yo wants to learn, and seems bright, can you do read alouds daily, and let her choose the words she wants to read, and only do that? That one thing?

If your previous kids have been tough you might be pleasantly surprised at how easy it is to teach an intuitive reader. Use the read-aloud, sound-out the hard words method, and he might just pick it up. Mine were not early readers but they never had time to sit in my lap. I learned to read just by watching... none of us needed CVC practice specifically. None of us needed lists or grammar lessons. We just all picked it up. If your 5 yo doesn't pick it up, no harm done: you can do the lessons with the 6 yo.

My guess is that if she is super eager, she will put in effort and quickly surpass her brother.

Not to discourage you with the 6yo but it's really easy to teach intuitive learners to read by reading with them.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Comic books are a playful way....make a paper booklet http://www.fimp.net/makeabook.html or  http://experimentwithnature.com/03-found/experiment-with-paper-how-to-make-a-one-page-zine/#.WthiU4jwY2w .  Put the whole family in and have them go to an exotic destination.  Perhaps the younger ones can cut out magazine pics to put in the booklet, and an older one can put in the text.

You can also look at other peoples, for ex http://experimentwithnature.com/03-found/experiment-with-paper-how-to-make-a-one-page-zine/#.WthiU4jwY2w  but they won't be as fun as your "Adventures of Rose's Family" series....

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No advice on methods or resources, but any time I have a hard time getting something done, I move it to first thing in the morning for awhile.  It usually helps.

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Learning to read is not a one year thing, therefore, getting done with the 6 yr old before moving on to the 5 yr old is not that practical. Maybe try adding in the Leap Frog videos, Super Why, and whatever else that teaches reading that your children would be willing to watch. Add in online games such as StarFall. I think ETC or some others have online games. Also..I have heard great things about Reading Eggs.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is awful hard to keep up the excitement when you've struggled so hard. (Four tough to learn readers out of five here. Two still in progress.)

I've switched programs (for awhile) to help me. (Nothing seems to help them learn faster or better - just time and practice.) I've taken a break for a few weeks from all learn to read activities.

Seeing them curled up on the couch reading is worth it, but it is a long road here. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am only on teaching my second one to read (my hat is off to you, super mama, with eight kids!), but I have had good luck with a combo of Reading Eggs, plus buddy reading with Progressive Phonics.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few thoughts:

1. put everybody in front of Leapfrog videos. One of the joys of having so many close together is that there can be some overflow learning happening.

2. Play rhyming games altogether. It's easy enough to talk about that over lunch or to play a simple beanbag tossing game.

3. Use all of the electronic supports you can: star fall, reading eggs, etc.

4. Pull out the letter tiles and demonstrate cvc words to your 6&5 year olds. Have them take turns picking different tiles to change the words.

 

Not everyone is going to stay on the same trajectory.  I have younger siblings who have passed older ones in certain academic areas.  That's ok--we all have different strengths and abilities.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I get what you mean about being worn out. I have one that wears me out and leaves me with little hope or energy for the rest. 

 

I think your 6 yr old is doing fine. I think it would help of you relaxed. Start working with the 5 yr old and make it fun. Sure, the 6 yr old will be repeating lessons to go along side the 5 yr old, but that will only help to solidify things for the 6 yr old. Focus on the fun stuff that many would think of as extras. Then revisit the curriculum maybe in the fall.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5-10 minutes a day worked for my kids.  We did ETC ABC books.  After they were finished, we spent a week (more or less) on blending using a white board or letter tiles.  Finally, we added McGuffey readers (one lesson per day).  At some point we added in books like Frog & Toad for variety.  It's super simple and was effective for my kids. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another plug for Progressive Phonics and LeapFrog. My then 4 year old wanted to learn to read while I was teaching her then 5 year old brother. She caught on to CVC in a snap with Progressive Phonics (and it's free!) She hit a stumbling block when we got to the blending part, so we just hung out for a while practicing CVCs and are just now getting into blending now that she's 5 1/2. 

I have a good number of the Progressive Phonics books printed and bound and sitting on my shelf. If you think you would want to use them, PM me and I can send them to you if you want. I think I have the whole beginner level printed and bound individually. They're just sitting on a shelf collecting dust so I'd happily send them on to a new home to be used. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, texasmom33 said:

Another plug for Progressive Phonics and LeapFrog. My then 4 year old wanted to learn to read while I was teaching her then 5 year old brother. She caught on to CVC in a snap with Progressive Phonics (and it's free!) She hit a stumbling block when we got to the blending part, so we just hung out for a while practicing CVCs and are just now getting into blending now that she's 5 1/2. 

I have a good number of the Progressive Phonics books printed and bound and sitting on my shelf. If you think you would want to use them, PM me and I can send them to you if you want. I think I have the whole beginner level printed and bound individually. They're just sitting on a shelf collecting dust so I'd happily send them on to a new home to be used. 

done!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My 2, 3, and 6 yo all love LeapFrog. They can sing the songs to me when they see a word that is described by a song (something about silent e's and two vowels go walking... lol). My 8 yo already knows how to read, but he still watches the videos with them occasionally. That + electronic learning really have helped us a LOT when I feel stressed but need to feel like they're learning something in order to not feel even more stressed...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First of all, you have my admiration! :)

And secondly, some resources I liked:

  • Reading Bear: http://www.readingbear.org/ - 100% free & very comprehensive. 50 multimedia presentations covering all the main phonics rules. You have the option of having the vocabulary items it covers sounded out slowly, sounded out quickly, or having the sounding out left to the viewer. After you go through the first couple of presentations with your child, you could teach them to go through them themselves, so it could be a very hands-off method. 
  • Teach Your Monster to Read by Usborne: https://www.teachyourmonstertoread.com/. Free computer version, and I think about $5 on the iPad. It *is* for British English, but my son didn't seem to mind, and his reading improved dramatically from going through this program. If you create an account online, you should get three free PDF books as your child completes the three levels. The game consists of three worlds. We didn't do the first one, because my son already knew his letters when we got it, and I think there are better resources out there to teach letters and their sounds.
  • LeapFrog Letter Factory to learn letters and their sounds for kids 3+.
  • Preschool Prep: Letter Sounds for kids who are 2 to 3 years old. You could use those with your younger children. :)

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...