Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

StaceyinLA

What do you believe is the healthiest diet for life?

Recommended Posts

My son has food allergies and since his diagnosis I’ve done exhaustive research on “the best way to eat.”

 

i dont believe there is one best way and doctors are starting to say the same thing.

i think in general more vegetables and less sugar are universally “better” for you.

mediterranean looks to be great for most people.

vegetarian can be healthy for some but I no longer believe all (was a vegetarian for 6 years, vegan for 3)

 

the field of nutrition is still very young. We just don’t know enough to say what way is best, if there even is one way. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Jenny in Florida said:

Has any one posted this yet? I thought it was great, and I have already shared it around:

http://www.grubstreet.com/2018/03/ultimate-conversation-on-healthy-eating-and-nutrition.html

 

Great article, I find Mark Bittman to be pretty genuine and knowledgeable. 

 

His “How to cook everything vegetarian” cookbook is really great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe there is no one best way for all people.  Heard this this morning.  From the NPR website.  You can hear the podcast there. 

April 10, 2018

William Barrington, University of California Los Angeles – Genetics and Dietary Recommendations

William Barrington recording his Academic Minute. One diet does not fit all. William Barrington, postdoctoral scientist at the University of California Los Angeles, explores the role genetics play in determining which diet will work for you. William Barrington is a geneticist who investigates the relationship between nutrition and health. His graduate research was performed in David Threadgill's laboratories at NC State and Texas A&M Universities. He is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at UCLA. Genetics and Dietary Recommendations https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/04-10-18-UCLA-Genetics-and-Dietary-Recommendations.mp3 Historically, dietary recommendations have used a one-size-fits-all approach. The assumption that a diet that promotes health in one person will work equally well for another has been challenged by a growing appreciation that genetic factors can affect the way we respond to a given stimulus. The objective of our study was to identify the degree to which genetics influence the health effects of diet. Our study investigated the health effects of four popular human diets- a typical American diet, traditional Japanese and Mediterranean diets, and a low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet. The study was performed in mice, which have similar digestive systems and genetics as humans, but allow for precise control of environmental and genetic factors that is not possible in people. Mice were fed diets for six months, while a wide-range of clinical health parameters were evaluated, including changes in body weight, physical activity, metabolic rate, and signs of diabetes, liver disease and heart disease. While all the mice suffered negative effects of the American diet, the severity effects varied widely depending on the genetics of the mouse. Some mice had relatively minor effects, like slightly increased body fat, whereas others had metabolic syndrome similar to that observed in severely obese people. We then compared the effects of the American diet to the other three alternative diets. While no single alternative diet improved health across all the mice, there was at least one diet the improved health in each individual depending on their genetic makeup. The results of the study show that genetics profoundly affect how diets influence our health. A diet that is healthy for one individual may not be for another. Precision dietetics, which considers genetic factors in dietary recommendations, may provide better health outcomes than the traditional, one-size-fits-all dietary advice. Read More: [Genetics]: Improving Metabolic Health Through Precision Dietetics in Mice [Understand Nutrition]: Science Shows Promise of Personalized Diets Over Universal Recommendations

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, SparklyUnicorn said:

Maybe there is no one best way for all people.  Heard this this morning.  From the NPR website.  You can hear the podcast there. 

April 10, 2018

William Barrington, University of California Los Angeles – Genetics and Dietary Recommendations

William Barrington recording his Academic Minute. One diet does not fit all. William Barrington, postdoctoral scientist at the University of California Los Angeles, explores the role genetics play in determining which diet will work for you. William Barrington is a geneticist who investigates the relationship between nutrition and health. His graduate research was performed in David Threadgill's laboratories at NC State and Texas A&M Universities. He is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at UCLA. Genetics and Dietary Recommendations https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/04-10-18-UCLA-Genetics-and-Dietary-Recommendations.mp3 Historically, dietary recommendations have used a one-size-fits-all approach. The assumption that a diet that promotes health in one person will work equally well for another has been challenged by a growing appreciation that genetic factors can affect the way we respond to a given stimulus. The objective of our study was to identify the degree to which genetics influence the health effects of diet. Our study investigated the health effects of four popular human diets- a typical American diet, traditional Japanese and Mediterranean diets, and a low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet. The study was performed in mice, which have similar digestive systems and genetics as humans, but allow for precise control of environmental and genetic factors that is not possible in people. Mice were fed diets for six months, while a wide-range of clinical health parameters were evaluated, including changes in body weight, physical activity, metabolic rate, and signs of diabetes, liver disease and heart disease. While all the mice suffered negative effects of the American diet, the severity effects varied widely depending on the genetics of the mouse. Some mice had relatively minor effects, like slightly increased body fat, whereas others had metabolic syndrome similar to that observed in severely obese people. We then compared the effects of the American diet to the other three alternative diets. While no single alternative diet improved health across all the mice, there was at least one diet the improved health in each individual depending on their genetic makeup. The results of the study show that genetics profoundly affect how diets influence our health. A diet that is healthy for one individual may not be for another. Precision dietetics, which considers genetic factors in dietary recommendations, may provide better health outcomes than the traditional, one-size-fits-all dietary advice. Read More: [Genetics]: Improving Metabolic Health Through Precision Dietetics in Mice [Understand Nutrition]: Science Shows Promise of Personalized Diets Over Universal Recommendations

 

 

This makes a lot of sense to me.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, hornblower said:

Fwiw, globally about 75% of the world's population is lactose intolerant after weaning & yeah, it is bad for them. The ability to digest lactose after weaning is actually an identified genetic adaptation which appears well developed in some populations (specifically northern europeans) and is hardly present at all in other groups of people.  Assuming dairy is normal & traditional is inaccurate if you'e looking at homo s. sapiens as a whole. 

One of my objections to dairy is that it's stealing milk from babies & stealing babies from mamas. I think at many levels it's a crueller industry than just killing the darned animal quickly but that's a whole separate topic. 

I do think dairy is a much more cruel industry than beef (chicken/pork have it worse than beef). I have felt good about dairy when we had our own goats and, even though I milked them once a day, their babies stayed nursing as long as they wanted (and some were quite old when the goats finally kicked them off). I’m not saying I don’t eat dairy because I’d be lying, but I do eat from certain sources. The sad thing is, even those are likely pulling babies from mommas within a couple days. I hate that, and that’s one of the main reasons I limit, and would love to eliminate completely, dairy.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Bluegoat said:

What's interesting is that lab mice aren't exactly genetically all that diverse, compared to human beings.

 

I didn't read the original study (yet), but I think they manipulated the genes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/8/2018 at 10:21 PM, StaceyinLA said:

Do you think there is a way of eating that is truly healthier than others? If so, what is it, and what is it that makes you believe it’s better?

 

Generally, a diet that feeds your microbiome and maintains the mucus lining of the intestine is healthiest. Fasting properly is healthy, too, because it allows the body to “clean up” subcellular material which is otherwise inflammatory.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I appreciate all the comments here, and that Mark Bittman article was fantastic!

The reason I said I like to follow “rules” is I feel like makes it easy for me to prep meals and things when I have a particular diet I’m following. For instance I know Whole 30 recipes will be clean of most everything, but generally have lots of meat. I know a vegan meal won’t have animal products. It’s just easier on my brain. The problem is I am not really gonna follow any of that long-term.

I guess I just need to put forth a little more effort to tailor my diet (well, ours, since my husband is pretty much at my mercy) to what I want.

I know I need to curb the restaurant eating with the exception of the couple really clean places (and even our favorite burger place does a grass-fed beef and a buffalo burger, so I can opt for better quality there), and cut out sugar and anything prepared. Prepared foods aren’t really typical for me at home, but TJs frozen section has been my best friend during our remodel. Sugar isn’t usually a problem for me at all. I DO have a spoon of sugar and some heavy cream in my coffee daily (and I plan to cut this out at some point and go to a healthier coffee option that I also enjoy - just not now), but I drink a single cup, and I rarely eat any type of sweets.

All in all, it’s really the same things I already knew. I just need to actually do it all the time!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, StaceyinLA said:

I appreciate all the comments here, and that Mark Bittman article was fantastic!

The reason I said I like to follow “rules” is I feel like makes it easy for me to prep meals and things when I have a particular diet I’m following. For instance I know Whole 30 recipes will be clean of most everything, but generally have lots of meat. I know a vegan meal won’t have animal products. It’s just easier on my brain. The problem is I am not really gonna follow any of that long-term.

I guess I just need to put forth a little more effort to tailor my diet (well, ours, since my husband is pretty much at my mercy) to what I want.

I know I need to curb the restaurant eating with the exception of the couple really clean places (and even our favorite burger place does a grass-fed beef and a buffalo burger, so I can opt for better quality there), and cut out sugar and anything prepared. Prepared foods aren’t really typical for me at home, but TJs frozen section has been my best friend during our remodel. Sugar isn’t usually a problem for me at all. I DO have a spoon of sugar and some heavy cream in my coffee daily (and I plan to cut this out at some point and go to a healthier coffee option that I also enjoy - just not now), but I drink a single cup, and I rarely eat any type of sweets.

All in all, it’s really the same things I already knew. I just need to actually do it all the time!

 

I think a lot of time sets of rules are useful for just that reason - they work to make it easier for us to manage, rather than because they are the only or best approach.

I tend to think diet advice is a really excellent example of that, because often making it simple is what people need.  Simple, and built into a lifestyle that supports the good habits.  I think that's why food culture is so important.

In light of that, I'd say the best "diets" if you need to change the way you eat are the ones that simplify rather than add complications unnecessarily.  They rules should be targeted to the outcome you want - not necessarily directly but in a way that is efficient.  Ideally they should shape or fit in with your family food culture and that of the place you live, too, so you can participate in social situations without added stress.

I prefer things like - use a smaller plate for your meals and wait 20 min before you have seconds, eat 5 dinners aweek at home and pack lunches at home, or something like the no-s diet - they are based more on simple rules to modify behaviour.  They don't really cut out food groups, or have you hunting through the ingredients on a box for disallowed items, and you don't get caught up in worrying whats the best or right.  You know eating sweets on Sat and Sun only has an arbitrary quality, it's just meant to simplify your decision making and limit setting.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes I make paleo recipes and sometimes vegan. I just look for recipes that are whole foods and look yummy.

I agree w/ Bluegoat, keep things simple. 

But nobody is perfect all the time, we all compromise in some way some of the times. I've stopped calling those instances failure, or bad/unclean eating. Nope, I'm done with that. 

I had some gf pizza Saturday. I ate a couple of Peeps Monday. I didn't earn them or work them off later. I didn't feel guilt. I enjoyed them. I didn't do a 'cleanse' to undo the 'damage'. I just went on my way, continuing to eat good whole foods as I do 90%+ of the time. I did continue my workout plans as usual and I was craving even more veggies, I loved my HUGE veggie stirfry as much as I did my Pizza and Peeps :) Work on changing the habits that don't make you feel good, let the focus be positive. My focus is on eating as many veggies and fruits and fresh food as I can because I know I feel great when I do, that automatically crowds out the crap. I focus on buying good food and giving myself time to prepare it but some days and seasons are harder than others. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The problem with adapting to the food culture in which I live is, I live in Louisiana. We may not be famous for much down here, but we are famous for our food, and while it is mostly amazing; it’s certainly not considered healthy. ;-p

I get what you’re saying though. Honestly, I know what I should and shouldn’t eat. It’s just tough around here to follow. There are so many great places to eat I find it difficult to go run errands and NOT eat out. I just LOVE so many different types of food.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, exactly.

My MIL has recently lost over 40 lbs, and the only thing she did was cut out most snacks and started using a lunch plate at supper.  If she is still hungry she will have seconds, but mostly she doesn't need to.  At Easter dinner she used the same plates as everyone else since it was her good china.

Not that that will work for everyone, but I think best chance of success is usually with KISS.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, StaceyinLA said:

The problem with adapting to the food culture in which I live is, I live in Louisiana. We may not be famous for much down here, but we are famous for our food, and while it is mostly amazing; it’s certainly not considered healthy. ;-p

I get what you’re saying though. Honestly, I know what I should and shouldn’t eat. It’s just tough around here to follow. There are so many great places to eat I find it difficult to go run errands and NOT eat out. I just LOVE so many different types of food.

 

THat's interesting, most of the things that come to my mind seem like they are pretty healthy!  What kind of stuff is common?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two things convinced me to change my eating habits.  The first was the Blue Zone studies which showed that the populations that live the longest eat lots of plant foods, and very little animal foods.  The second was Dr. Michael Gregor's book How Not to Die.  I went strict vegan to try to make up for the damage that I'd done to my body with 12 years of keto.  But strict vegan is probably not necessary for most people.  I think for the average person, I would recommend reducing processed foods and fast foods, and making things from scratch at home; and increasing fruits, veggies, legumes, and whole grains while reducing meat and dairy.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, StaceyinLA said:

The problem with adapting to the food culture in which I live is, I live in Louisiana. We may not be famous for much down here, but we are famous for our food, and while it is mostly amazing; it’s certainly not considered healthy. ;-p

I get what you’re saying though. Honestly, I know what I should and shouldn’t eat. It’s just tough around here to follow. There are so many great places to eat I find it difficult to go run errands and NOT eat out. I just LOVE so many different types of food.

I live in a small Midwest town, we don't have great eating out options either, on the plus side it saves a lot of money! Well, maybe if you want to eat out more often you look for more real food options most of the time and save the really indulgent food for special occasions and really enjoy them. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What I liked about Dr Greger's book was that it told me what to eat and not just what not to eat. I have his app on my phone and try to eat as much of the good things on his list a day that I can and don't really pay attention to what not to eat. It's super easy and simple and I work well with check lists. I've been consciously avoiding meat and minimizing dairy but if DH or other family members make lasagna or something else with meat and cheese I will eat it and not care. It's no big deal. By focusing on fitting in all the good foods, however, I find I'm naturally eating less of the foods that aren't as good for me because I'm full and there's not that much time in the day. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/11/2018 at 8:06 AM, StaceyinLA said:

The problem with adapting to the food culture in which I live is, I live in Louisiana. We may not be famous for much down here, but we are famous for our food, and while it is mostly amazing; it’s certainly not considered healthy. ;-p 

Ever since I heard you can get vegan beignets at a restaurant called Seed in New Orleans, I've wanted to go. I suspect I could live on those... :D 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/12/2018 at 4:06 PM, Paige said:

What I liked about Dr Greger's book was that it told me what to eat and not just what not to eat. I have his app on my phone and try to eat as much of the good things on his list a day that I can and don't really pay attention to what not to eat. It's super easy and simple and I work well with check lists. I've been consciously avoiding meat and minimizing dairy but if DH or other family members make lasagna or something else with meat and cheese I will eat it and not care. It's no big deal. By focusing on fitting in all the good foods, however, I find I'm naturally eating less of the foods that aren't as good for me because I'm full and there's not that much time in the day. 

I really like that app for the same reason:  it helps me focus on all the great things I get to eat each day, and it just kind of naturally pushes not-so-great things out of the diet without the focus being on what I'm missing or avoiding.  I think it's a very helpful tool.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...