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Book a Week 2018 - BW15: National Poetry Month goes International


Robin M
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1 hour ago, aggieamy said:

I guess my post could be misconstrued into an anti-mermaid prejudice (which I promise I don't have!) but really I just love a country who can pass laws on mythical creatures. Unless of course the Ministry of Magic had something to do with this ...

 

At the Seder I went to this Passover we had a spirited ecumenical discussion over whether mermaids were kosher (only the bottom half?) and whether Catholics could eat them on Fridays.

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54 minutes ago, Violet Crown said:

 

At the Seder I went to this Passover we had a spirited ecumenical discussion over whether mermaids were kosher (only the bottom half?) and whether Catholics could eat them on Fridays.

And what was the conclusion?

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1 hour ago, Maus said:

And what was the conclusion?

 

1. Not kosher; though they have fins and scales, the more general principle is No Weird Fish. But you’d have to get your rabbi’s ruling.

2. Acceptable on days of abstinence; marine creatures, and certainly as fishy as muskrats and alligators, which count as fish. But you’d have to get your bishop’s ruling.

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16 minutes ago, Violet Crown said:

 

1. Not kosher; though they have fins and scales, the more general principle is No Weird Fish. But you’d have to get your rabbi’s ruling.

2. Acceptable on days of abstinence; marine creatures, and certainly as fishy as muskrats and alligators, which count as fish. But you’d have to get your bishop’s ruling.

Muskrats?  Totally missed that one and never would have guesssed.?

I just started to listen to Christie’s The Murder of Rodger Ackroyd and googled a place name which was fictional but found this article.  http://www.poirot.us/world.php   When I have a chance I will explore more from that blog, looks fascinating!

 

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On 4/8/2018 at 7:47 PM, Robin M said:

Sheri Cobb South's For Deader or Worse and Dinner Most Deadly from her Detective John set Picket series set in England are ready to move on to a new home.  Wonderful series.

I've also been reading Sheri Cobb South books.  I re-read For Deader or Worse  and the short story, Finders Weepers; I also read, for the first time, Mystery Loves Company.  I enjoyed them all.

I also continued my re-read of T. Hammond's Team Red books by reading books five and six: Blind-sided  and Blind Luck.

Regards,
Kareni

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A post from Book Riot that has me thinking about my own preferences.

Having A Preference On The Shape Of Books

"I care about the shape of books. I don’t have the attention span for ebooks or audiobooks. I wish I did, but I just don’t. I can’t focus when I’m listening to someone read out loud either, so it’s not just ebooks. But I can’t stare at a screen for long without wanting to look something up or scroll around some random website.

One thing I really like about physical books is that I’m completely disconnected. No camera looking at me, no internet temptations. I hate when books are only available as an ebook (like Karrine Steffans’s How to Make Love to a Martian) because I want to hold a book while I read. That’s one of the reasons I like Ta-Nehisi Coates’s We Were Eight Years In Power so much. Reading his articles offline and in print felt better...."

After reading the article above (click link), does it have you thinking about your own preferences?

Regards,
Kareni

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32 minutes ago, Kareni said:

A post from Book Riot that has me thinking about my own preferences.

Having A Preference On The Shape Of Books

"I care about the shape of books. I don’t have the attention span for ebooks or audiobooks. I wish I did, but I just don’t. I can’t focus when I’m listening to someone read out loud either, so it’s not just ebooks. But I can’t stare at a screen for long without wanting to look something up or scroll around some random website.

One thing I really like about physical books is that I’m completely disconnected. No camera looking at me, no internet temptations. I hate when books are only available as an ebook (like Karrine Steffans’s How to Make Love to a Martian) because I want to hold a book while I read. That’s one of the reasons I like Ta-Nehisi Coates’s We Were Eight Years In Power so much. Reading his articles offline and in print felt better...."

After reading the article above (click link), does it have you thinking about your own preferences?

Regards,
Kareni

I prefer physical books over the kindle, but hard back vs paperback depends on where I'm reading. I especially love a hard bound book that will lay open on the table next to me while I eat. I have used all sorts of implements as book weights to hold open pages -- butter knives, my phone, the number stand at the neighborhood taco shop. But I hate a heavy hard bound book that is cumbersome and heavy to hold when reading in bed. I can't deal with small print anymore, so won't touch most trade paperbacks. I don't mind rough cut edges on the paper, but its been a while since I've seen a book like that. I do like nice paper -- the only thing I don't like about the print version of War and Peace I bought during last summer's read is the thin paper, almost like old air mail stationary (anyone here old enough to know what I'm referencing?!)

Audiobooks only work if I'm doing something like driving, knitting or quilting. But I can't be looking at directions on a knitting pattern or cut fabric while listening to an audiobook -- just can't break concentration long enough to focus on the craft at hand! Or when driving I turn the book off when I'm looking for a parking place or a specific address. And an audiobook can't be something that will make me squirm. Call the Midwife, for instance, with the graphic descriptions of medical stuff, was just too much for my drives! I'd need it in print so I could squint my eyes and skim over the icky stuff, lol!! 

Oh -- thinking of old air mail stationary reminded me of trying in vain to find some paper in the house that had a watermark. I was reading aloud Hound of the Baskervilles, and wanted to show the kids what a watermark is since it was a big clue. 

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There are no internet temptations with a Kindle Paperwhite. There's no camera looking at me.  It's strictly an ereader. The most I could do is go to the Kindle store and buy books. The screen looks like a book page. Most of the time I don't even have the wifi on, only when I need to download a book. As someone who's always got more than one book going I love being able to bring all of them with me in the form of my Kindle. 

I'm the opposite when it comes to deciding if a book is worth reading. If a book isn't available as an ebook I probably won't read it, though there are a few exceptions. However, there are very few print books I've read in the last five years.

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I prefer physical books over kindle ones, too, BUT definitely enjoy the ability to read in bed at night without having the lamp on. Also, the weight of a book matters! When the colored versions of the Little House books first came out I bought the entire set. No one wanted to read them because they were SO HEAVY - I kept finding my readers with our old battered set and  felt foolish for spending all the money on the new ones. Lesson learned.

I agree with Jen - the print on some paperbacks is so teeny tiny I just can't read it and don't want to have to put on readers. And paper feel is important. I think my favorite size of book is about 5X8 or so. The most current example I can think of is my paperback copy of The Bear and the Nightingale. The pages were nice and floppy and I didn't struggle to keep it open. 

And you all know I love audiobooks.

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Just waving to everyone.  With the help of the nice tech people, I am logged back in on the new boards. : )

Nothing but comfort reads for me recently as I deal with some family stuff like kids shipping out or coming back and various family health problems.  Robin McKinley and Georgette Heyer.  Pretty fluffy. : )

Hugs to all,

Nan

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If I am reading for information, I like the material to be in print form because I can skim it more easily that way.  Columns, like a textbook, are nice.  I like divisions, headings, sidebars, illustrations, etc..  For that matter, if you can turn the information into a graphic of some form, I would rather absorb it that way.  And I like some sort of overview that I can look at first because then I don't have to work so hard to put the pieces together.  Mostly, though, I read for escape.  The deepest escape, for me, is an actual printed book.  I prefer hardbacks because the print size is more comfortable and because I reread books a lot and they last longer and survive the rather tough life books lead with me - reading them on docks and in boats and stuffing them into duffle bags.  I like small paperbacks because they are lighter weight and fit into my pocket.  People never stopped reading aloud to me and if I have to do something that doesn't take brain power, I prefer to do it while listening to a book.  Most housework and driving happens while I am listening to a book.  I have learned to escape into an audiobook fairly deeply if I am doing something repetitive, like walking.  If it is an adult fiction book, I would rather not have illustrations, since I like to form my own images.  If it is an audiobook that a family member or good reader first read to me, I hate having to listen to it in a new voice when I listen to it again.  If I read the book for myself, I hear it in the voice I liked.  I recently discovered that I could use the adaptive text to voice feature on my iphone to read library ebooks to me, which has greatly expanded my audiobook options.  There is enough expression in the computer voice that I can understand it well.  This has expanded my audiobook options as much as discovering that as a resident of Massachusetts, I was allowed to get a Boston Public library card.  I like graphic novels, but I approach them with caution because adding graphics to the story doubles the emotional impact for me.

Nan

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23 hours ago, Violet Crown said:

 

At the Seder I went to this Passover we had a spirited ecumenical discussion over whether mermaids were kosher (only the bottom half?) and whether Catholics could eat them on Fridays.

 

20 hours ago, Violet Crown said:

 

1. Not kosher; though they have fins and scales, the more general principle is No Weird Fish. But you’d have to get your rabbi’s ruling.

2. Acceptable on days of abstinence; marine creatures, and certainly as fishy as muskrats and alligators, which count as fish. But you’d have to get your bishop’s ruling.

Boy oh boy. My family is going to be so excited when I switch up the menu on Friday and they get muskrat.

And because I like to take a joke too far I looked up where you can buy muskrat meat. The nearest dealer to me is about three hours away in Omaha. But! It looks like there's a mail order option.

https://www.exoticmeatmarkets.com/Muskrat-Meat-I-Exotic-Meat-Market-I-Exotic-Meats-p/muskrat1601.htm

This is not a budget meat. Much more expensive than the fancy salmon I always talk myself out of buying. My poor family will be spared this delicacy because I'm too frugal.

2 hours ago, Lady Florida. said:

There are no internet temptations with a Kindle Paperwhite. There's no camera looking at me.  It's strictly an ereader. The most I could do is go to the Kindle store and buy books. The screen looks like a book page. Most of the time I don't even have the wifi on, only when I need to download a book. As someone who's always got more than one book going I love being able to bring all of them with me in the form of my Kindle. 

I'm the opposite when it comes to deciding if a book is worth reading. If a book isn't available as an ebook I probably won't read it, though there are a few exceptions. However, there are very few print books I've read in the last five years.

I'm finding this discussion fascinating. So many wildly different views on books vs kindles. (I hope we aren't on our way to what future generations will call The Great Books vs eReaders Kerfuffle of 2018.) Luckily we're a calm friendly group.

I'm go in spurts of doing a few books on my kindle and then a few in print. I can't get library books on my Kindle so if it's available at the library I read it as a paper book. If I'm forced to buy it (for Amy's attitude towards buying something she could have for the not insignificant amount of money paid in property taxes please see my above discussion on (1) taxes and (2) the outrageous cost of muskrat meat these days) I will probably read it on my kindle since it's easy to just click and buy it. Or sometimes really old books are free which is nice too. While traveling I much prefer the kindle and will never go back to my suitcase full of books ways.

My official vote is: I have no preference and prefer them equally.

34 minutes ago, Nan in Mass said:

If I am reading for information, I like the material to be in print form because I can skim it more easily that way.  Columns, like a textbook, are nice.  I like divisions, headings, sidebars, illustrations, etc..  For that matter, if you can turn the information into a graphic of some form, I would rather absorb it that way.  And I like some sort of overview that I can look at first because then I don't have to work so hard to put the pieces together.  Mostly, though, I read for escape.  The deepest escape, for me, is an actual printed book.  I prefer hardbacks because the print size is more comfortable and because I reread books a lot and they last longer and survive the rather tough life books lead with me - reading them on docks and in boats and stuffing them into duffle bags.  I like small paperbacks because they are lighter weight and fit into my pocket.  People never stopped reading aloud to me and if I have to do something that doesn't take brain power, I prefer to do it while listening to a book.  Most housework and driving happens while I am listening to a book.  I have learned to escape into an audiobook fairly deeply if I am doing something repetitive, like walking.  If it is an adult fiction book, I would rather not have illustrations, since I like to form my own images.  If it is an audiobook that a family member or good reader first read to me, I hate having to listen to it in a new voice when I listen to it again.  If I read the book for myself, I hear it in the voice I liked.  I recently discovered that I could use the adaptive text to voice feature on my iphone to read library ebooks to me, which has greatly expanded my audiobook options.  There is enough expression in the computer voice that I can understand it well.  This has expanded my audiobook options as much as discovering that as a resident of Massachusetts, I was allowed to get a Boston Public library card.  I like graphic novels, but I approach them with caution because adding graphics to the story doubles the emotional impact for me.

Nan

Caveat! I much much prefer non-fiction with sections, columns, graphics, and all in paper book form. A lot of times with certain non-fiction I just want to read the sections that are relevant to my life and that's much easier to discover in a paper book vs an eReader.

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I finished A Murder for her Majesty by Beth Hilgartner. Highly recommend to the 10 yo history loving readers in your house. Lots of adventure. Great setting too. The author knows York very well and it translates well into scenery in the book.

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The Shambles in York. Picture credit to Andrew Pickett.

Also the Shambles.

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I used to always prefer print books to ebooks, but I have to say that I have learned to love Overdrive, which I just read on my phone.  I'm still to cheap to buy a dedicated ereader or pay for ebooks. ;)

I have also started listening to a lot more audio books since I've given up listening to news or music in the car.  I do like audiobooks (caveat: must have good narrator).  I'm a fairly auditory learner.

I still read the most in print, though.  Hardcover or one of the bigger paperbacks with nicer paper and big enough print and white space.  Those little mass market paperbacks I read when I was younger have too tiny type and not enough white space to rest my old eyes.  And it doesn't help that it seems that all of them on my shelves now have badly yellowed paper.

I tend to read narrative non-fiction, so I don't really want columns or summaries, though I'm not ever averse to an explanatory graphic.  If I'm reading some kind of more textbooky non-fiction or something where I'm not looking to actually read the book in order but am skimming or looking for specific information, I don't mind columns, sections and summaries are great, graphics are even more welcome,  but just none of those horrible sidebars.

 

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My Brit Trip update. So far I'm keeping up! Nothing has caught my interest for Tyne and Wear next week so I might read an Agatha Christie and call it a WILD CARD.

London (Scotland Yard) – Now You See Me
Cambridgeshire – Dead Scared
Huntingdonshire – The Children of Green Knowe
Bedfordshire – Cambridge Blue
Northamptonshire and Rutland – The Red House Mystery (Wild Card)
Nottinghamshire – Miss Silver Comes to Stay
East and West Riding of Yorkshire – Dying in the Wool
York – A Murder for her Majesty

North Yorkshire – The Old Fox Deceiv’d
Durham – Rose Cottage

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So I only seem to get on here when I'm at work and this week has been crazy busy so far, but I just managed to sneak a look at the Robin's introductory post and note that I managed to celebrate poetry month!

I was at Costco last night and they had a bunch of Shel Silverstein poetry books; we have one and DS loves it so I picked up another one. He was so excited that is was quite sweet and spend last night selecting special poems to read to us.  This morning I brought the kids to work with me (long story) and he picked the poetry book along with his current chapter book to bring with him.

It's quite neat to see how much he enjoys poetry - reading it, both funny poems and more serious poems, short or long, but also creating poetry.

I'm hoping to have time to read through the rest of the thread today or tomorrow!

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1 hour ago, Raifta said:

I was at Costco last night and they had a bunch of Shel Silverstein poetry books; we have one and DS loves it so I picked up another one.

I read somewhere that Shel Silverstein books are one of the most commonly stolen books for school libraries. That's a compliment to him!

Does your DS have any favorite poems yet?

I tried to figure out my favorite Shel Silverstein poem but that's rather like trying to figure out your favorite type of donut. I couldn't pick one but I saw this online and something about it just charmed me.

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I greatly prefer reading on my Kindle and IPad to paper books.  Like Kathy I am generally reading with the WiFi off.  My Kindle reader can easily be thrown in a bag and I can happily skip between a huge stack of books while out with no added weight!  I have recently switched to the iPad at night because the print is larger and the lighting a bit kinder to dh.  The other added benefit is while falling asleep I tended to turn pages on the kindle fire by accident on the iPad I seem to only highlight.  Numerous highlights do not effect my place in my books so no real bother!  I do wonder what someone reading my highlights will think!

My hands are a big reason for giving up on paper books.  When I read them now I tend to sit with the book on my lap or table for hardcovers which means I actually need to plan my time around being in a place I can read comfortably if I want to tackle a hardcover book.  Like Mothersweets my ideal size is probably the 5 x 8 paperback.  Light enough to read laying down but large enough to normally have proper sized print.  They also tend to stay open without spine cracking.  I love the ease of small paperbacks and recently read one with full sized print and seriously thought about how much I was enjoying that book experience  while reading.  Small paperbacks are the best but frequently are bound tighter so the need for spine cracking which I hate.  

I currently have a huge stack of physical books from the library because of Brit Tripping.  I am enjoying them but actually have a bit of a schedule to hopefully finish before they are due.....ummm, run out of renewal options is more honest.  Wink

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It appears that one can download a free copy of Jane Austen's Emma  here.

Also currently free:

mystery:   Innocent Strangers  by Millys Altman

mystery:  The Blue Coyote    by Karen Musser Nortman

male/male paranormal romance ~  The Omega's Bodyguard (The Protection of the Pack Book 1)   by  Dessa Lux


A bookish post ~ Five Non-Fiction Books About Fairies in the Real World  by Alex Bledsoe

and one of a continuing series of posts:  Fighting Erasure: Women SF Writers of the 1970s, Part IV  by James Davis Nicoll

Regards,
Kareni

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On 4/11/2018 at 2:55 PM, Violet Crown said:

 

1. Not kosher; though they have fins and scales, the more general principle is No Weird Fish. But you’d have to get your rabbi’s ruling.

2. Acceptable on days of abstinence; marine creatures, and certainly as fishy as muskrats and alligators, which count as fish. But you’d have to get your bishop’s ruling.

Back to the muskrats............Per dd this is why beavers are extinct in England.  Fishy creatures.  

 

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29 minutes ago, mumto2 said:

Back to the muskrats............Per dd this is why beavers are extinct in England.  Fishy creatures.  

 

 

I think it's more likely to have been their fur that did them in; certainly the Scottish Presbyterians weren't hunting them down for Lenten fare when they vanished from the Highlands (the beavers, not the Presbyterians).

ETA: Google says they've been reintroduced to the UK! Great news.

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I was expecting to be able to start reading "My Family and Other Animals" today, but annoyingly my eyes missed the slip in title of "My Animals and Other Family." I wasn't interested in it. I have such little precious reading time I want the book I know will be good. ;)

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9 minutes ago, Violet Crown said:

 

I think it's more likely to have been their fur that did them in; certainly the Scottish Presbyterians weren't hunting them down for Lenten fare when they vanished from the Highlands (the beavers, not the Presbyterians).

ETA: Google says they've been reintroduced to the UK! Great news.

Lol,  Now I wonder if she was teasing me.....I told her about Amy shopping for Muskrat and how expensive it is (actually the fact you can buy it is pretty amazing).   They have reintroduced them in Scotland for sure.  One of the wildlife organizations sponsors walks in the summer to see them.  We keep saying we will sign up and go but haven’t managed to yet.  

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On 4/11/2018 at 10:07 AM, aggieamy said:

*heart*

This makes me love the British Empire even more. When I try to read poetry I get frustrated and I feel as though I'm missing the point or message. Listening to it read like this registers more with me.

 

On 4/11/2018 at 10:59 AM, aggieamy said:

I guess my post could be misconstrued into an anti-mermaid prejudice (which I promise I don't have!) but really I just love a country who can pass laws on mythical creatures. Unless of course the Ministry of Magic had something to do with this ...

I agree that I loved hearing the author read his poem. However, my reaction was not one of love for the British Empire. I don't think the author is writing of a love of the Empire either. The point is that at the time the law was made, mermaids were believed (or highly suspected) to be real. Essentially, the rulers of the Empire were so arrogant and believed that they should naturally control and own all other lands, creatures, and people. So it's not a whimsical or humorous law. It was truly meant to indicate that mermaids if and when found would be the property of Britain. It is a poem that speaks to the negativity of imperialism. 

I do think we can agree on the dreaminess of Miller's voice. 

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2 hours ago, Mom-ninja. said:

I agree that I loved hearing the author read his poem. However, my reaction was not one of love for the British Empire. I don't think the author is writing of a love of the Empire either. The point is that at the time the law was made, mermaids were believed (or highly suspected) to be real. Essentially, the rulers of the Empire were so arrogant and believed that they should naturally control and own all other lands, creatures, and people. So it's not a whimsical or humorous law. It was truly meant to indicate that mermaids if and when found would be the property of Britain. It is a poem that speaks to the negativity of imperialism. 

I do think we can agree on the dreaminess of Miller's voice. 

I agree. I don't think he's talking about love of the empire either but sometimes some of the best literary characters that we love (Snape? Gatsby? Holden Caulfield?) are not the best of people. 

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All I can think is -- poor mermaids!   ;)

 And now I have Captain and Tenille's  Muskrat Love in my head.  

Loving all the video poems and written poems.  Thank you for sharing! 

Hi Nan! Glad to see you popping in.

Preference of books.  I never thought I'd get into ebooks and now about 50% of my reading is on Ipad. The main reason I started with ebooks was for the convenience while traveling. Used to lug along lots of paperbacks so appreciate my Ipad.  Now that I can read on my iphone as well, keep the ipad at home.  Fiction only though. Doesn't work for nonfiction since I take alot of notes and like to highlight or underline things I want to remember.  I find with ereader, I tend to read more quickly so end up reading books more than once with the reminder to slow down the 2nd time around.  I go through phases where I only read physical books. I like the long uninterrupted periods without the distraction of technology at my fingertips.  As long as the font isn't too small, I don't have difficulties.  Usually the really chunky paperbacks tend to run to smaller print, so end up going with ebook.   I'm quite picky when it comes to audiobooks and narrators.   I used to never listen to stories so started by listening to stories I already read.  And I discovered recently I still prefer listening to stories I've already read because new stories take too much concentration and if I get distracted, I have to pop it back 30 seconds or more several times to keep up.  Usually listen in the car and sometimes while cooking or cleaning. 

I'm currently rereading Patricia Brigg's Alpha and Omega series. Finished Cry Wolf and now on Hunting Ground.  

Downloaded Keri Arthur's City of Light to listen to next in the car.  

Still have Far North by Michael Ridpath for Iceland read and Elizabeth Chadwick's Lady of the English (brit trip) waiting in the wings.  

 

 

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Waving to Nan and Stella......glad you stopped by! :)

I just finished Lake Silence by Anne Bishop.  It's wonderful!!! I came as close as possible to reading it in one sitting and still do things like sleep for a while at night and ride around with ds so he gets some driving experience.  I didn't expect to like it because I love the Lakeside portion of the series but after I got through the first dozen pages (3 trys lol). I couldn't put it down! he

I am also skipping Tyne and Wear for now.  Nothing appeals.   I am hoping to bump into it as I read books set in Northumbria but if not it's time for a wild card.  The Vera series is one of my goals for Brit Tripping.  The second one finally became available on Overdrive.  Yeah!   I also finished Aunt Dimity Beats the Devil.  The setting was one small part of the border country in Northumbria.  I did enjoy the descriptions of the moors there.  Really steep inclines from personal experience on narrow roads.   We had quite an exciting time following local friends to a pub lunch there.  They drove really fast, probably 60, over continuous rolling hills.  We kept losing sight of them because they were several bumps ahead and no Sat Nav reception.

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It appears that one can download a free copy of  Captain Blood by Rafael Sabatini  here.

Also currently free:

a mystery ~ I'm Going to Kill that Cat!  by F. Della Notte

medieval romance ~ SALVATION (THE SWORD AND THE CROSS  by Olivia Rae

historical fiction set in the  American Northwest, early 1900's. ~  Timber Rose  by J.L. Oakley

Regards,
Kareni

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For Ebooks / Kindle books I use the app on my tablet.

I like them for books in English and other foreign languages as they have often a linked dictionary :)

I start to dislike very cheap pockets with yellow or grey paper and small font. I also dislike bad glued paperbacks that can’t stay open..

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Last night I finished The Last Wolf (The Legend of All Wolves)  by Maria Vale.  It took me a while to get caught up in the story, but I ultimately enjoyed it.  I look forward to reading the author's next book set in this world.  

"For three days out of thirty, when the moon is full and her law is iron, the Great North Pack must be wild.

If she returns to her Pack, the stranger will die.
But if she stays...

Silver Nilsdottir is at the bottom of her Pack's social order, with little chance for a decent mate and a better life. Until the day a stranger stumbles into their territory, wounded and beaten, and Silver decides to risk everything on Tiberius Leveraux. But Tiberius isn't all he seems, and in the fragile balance of the Pack and wild, he may tip the destiny of all wolves..."

3 hours ago, mumto2 said:

I just finished Lake Silence by Anne Bishop.  It's wonderful!!! ...

I'm glad you finally got to read the book and that you enjoyed it.  The Last Wolf reminds me a bit of Anne Bishop's The Others, but I can't quite figure out why.  The Last Wolf is definitely written for adults so that aspect is different.

Regards,
Kareni

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This afternoon I finished listening to Alexander the Great.  As a history nerd I enjoyed it. The author, Phillip Freeman did a decent job staying neutral except for a small bit at the end. He also did a good job weeding out myth from fact about Alexander's life and exploits. 

 

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4 hours ago, Kareni said:

Last night I finished The Last Wolf (The Legend of All Wolves)  by Maria Vale.  It took me a while to get caught up in the story, but I ultimately enjoyed it.  I look forward to reading the author's next book set in this world.  

"For three days out of thirty, when the moon is full and her law is iron, the Great North Pack must be wild.

If she returns to her Pack, the stranger will die.
But if she stays...

Silver Nilsdottir is at the bottom of her Pack's social order, with little chance for a decent mate and a better life. Until the day a stranger stumbles into their territory, wounded and beaten, and Silver decides to risk everything on Tiberius Leveraux. But Tiberius isn't all he seems, and in the fragile balance of the Pack and wild, he may tip the destiny of all wolves..."

I'm glad you finally got to read the book and that you enjoyed it.  The Last Wolf reminds me a bit of Anne Bishop's The Others, but I can't quite figure out why.  The Last Wolf is definitely written for adults so that aspect is different.

Regards,
Kareni

I just put The Last Wolf on hold.  There are two patrons ahead of me on overdrive so it is apparently popular.

I also released my suspension on the new Patricia Briggs.  I don’t have it yet but there are multiple copies and I am next.  I had it waiting because I was trying to decide if a reread was required! ;). I am sticking with my CS Harris reread even though I have to wait for the next book.  Btw,  have I already convinced you to read the St, Cyr series.  After reading the Anne Cleeland books I really think you would enjoy them.  The main character has flaws.....not as significant ones but serious flaws.  Historical

4 hours ago, Lady Florida. said:

This afternoon I finished listening to Alexander the Great.  As a history nerd I enjoyed it. The author, Phillip Freeman did a decent job staying neutral except for a small bit at the end. He also did a good job weeding out myth from fact about Alexander's life and exploits. 

 

I am about to sound whiny but the audiobook for this is long,  right? I can’t seem to tell without checking it out and I can’t because someone already has it.  I am hunting for my ancient civilization Bingo square and this has potential.  

I am not sure that Amelia Peabody really qualifies.  The Ancient Civilization square is in the bonus mystery section but I think we don’t have to read mysteries. I need to start working on the Bingo card again!

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1 hour ago, mumto2 said:

I just put The Last Wolf on hold. 

I'll be interested in hearing your thoughts when you read it.

1 hour ago, mumto2 said:

I also released my suspension on the new Patricia Briggs.  I don’t have it yet but there are multiple copies and I am next.  I had it waiting because I was trying to decide if a reread was required! ;).

Same comment as above!  (For what it's worth, I did re-read.)

1 hour ago, mumto2 said:

 Btw,  have I already convinced you to read the St, Cyr series.  After reading the Anne Cleeland books I really think you would enjoy them.  The main character has flaws.....not as significant ones but serious flaws.  Historical

I think this is your first attempt at persuasion regarding this series.  (There had been an attempt concerning Louise Penny's Armand Gamache novels; I put the first book aside after a few chapters but might give it another try at some point.)  I've requested What Angels Fear from the library.  We shall see what happens!

Regards,
Kareni

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9 hours ago, PeacefulChaos said:

Popping in quickly tonight - I'll be offline for awhile! We're moving tomorrow and haven't heard yet when our (unfortunately slower) internet will be getting connected at the new house.  Hopefully it won't be more than a week or (gasp!) ....two?  *insert passing out emoji here*

Just in case you check in ........Wishing you a trouble free move.  I hope you love your new house!  I also hope they install your internet quickly.  We will miss you!

 

10 hours ago, Kareni said:

 

I think this is your first attempt at persuasion regarding this series.  (There had been an attempt concerning Louise Penny's Armand Gamache novels; I put the first book aside after a few chapters but might give it another try at some point.)  I've requested What Angels Fear from the library.  We shall see what happens!

Regards,
Kareni

I am looking forward to hearing what you think.  FWIW because of my reread I now know the first two books are almost prequels to the real story.  Dd, who loves these also but is 19 not 13, asked the other day if a certain incident had happened in my reread yet.  We think it’s in the Mermaid (this thread is tying together nicely lol) one.  Which is my next book.  That’s when the story starts........

I quit reading Louise Penny after the first two for a few years.  I came back to them because of a comment here and fell in love with them.  At some point I plan to reread.  I am sure I missed a great deal because of my break;).

Patricia Briggs will need to be the massive reread of the whole world not just Alpha and Omega.  I think you have done the whole.  I am going to need to find the list.  Maybe before the next release........Agatha Christie currently has my attention.

Almost done with The Murder of Roger Ackroyd!

18 hours ago, loesje22000 said:

For Ebooks / Kindle books I use the app on my tablet.

I like them for books in English and other foreign languages as they have often a linked dictionary :)

I start to dislike very cheap pockets with yellow or grey paper and small font. I also dislike bad glued paperbacks that can’t stay open..

I doubt that even a linked dictionary would help me!  :). Any news on the exam?

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12 hours ago, mumto2 said:

I

I am about to sound whiny but the audiobook for this is long,  right? I can’t seem to tell without checking it out and I can’t because someone already has it.  I am hunting for my ancient civilization Bingo square and this has potential.  

 

Re: Alexander the Great audio book. It's 12-1/2 hours.

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12 minutes ago, mumto2 said:

 

I doubt that even a linked dictionary would help me!  :). Any news on the exam?

 

:)

Unfortunetly no results yet. I had hoped the Easter Break would make getting the grades sooner, not later. :( Coming Wednessday they should publish the grades at last,  according their own rules...

Meanwhile the examplanning for september & october has been reveiled. So in May she will have English Oral, in September German Oral (And retaking French Oral, if necessary); October English Written. Now I am just waiting for the dates for Dutch Oral. And for the grade for French written.

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I've been looking around for what I want to read to fill up my Bingo Card. I don't like mysteries (please don't hate me!), so I wanted to find a non-mystery for Cozy. I just discovered Miss Read. Have any of you read her? They look very cozy but are not mysteries. I think I will give her a try.

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11 minutes ago, Penguin said:

I've been looking around for what I want to read to fill up my Bingo Card. I don't like mysteries (please don't hate me!), so I wanted to find a non-mystery for Cozy. I just discovered Miss Read. Have any of you read her? They look very cozy but are not mysteries. I think I will give her a try.

I first learned about Miss Read from Jane, and very much enjoyed a collection of Christmastime novels. I read them while in Hawaii one Christmas, and it was a bit of a disconnect to be enjoying the tropical breezes while reading about cold, rainy and snowy England. But they are decidedly cozy, very sweet and delightful.

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3 hours ago, Penguin said:

I've been looking around for what I want to read to fill up my Bingo Card. I don't like mysteries (please don't hate me!), so I wanted to find a non-mystery for Cozy. I just discovered Miss Read. Have any of you read her? They look very cozy but are not mysteries. I think I will give her a try.

That is a series that I read a couple of many years ago.  I don’t honestly remember anything other than they were a favorite of my Bf’s mom.  She also liked the Mitford series by Jan Karon which would qualify as cozy also, I think. I preferred Mitford but that’s all I remember......you are totally forgiven for not liking mysteries.  ;)

I did notice your Miss Read selection on Goodreads and thought to myself that I probably need to try those again.

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One of my favorite things about Bingo is the challenge of finding something you actually want to read for a square that, on the surface, holds no interest. I saw Miss Read on Instagram this morning - I had never heard of her before. 

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