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We went to a Sam's Club tonight (not the one we normally go to) and they had a "free hearing test" sign and hearing booth. No one was working as it was past business hours for that. I grabbed a business card, but left wondering whether or not audiologists run the equipment. They didn't use the term audiologist on the card, though. It says, "Licensed Hearing Instrument Specialist" and the particular person's credentials after their name are "HIS, BA." Huh?

 

I suspect this is not an audiologist, but not sure.

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We went to a Sam's Club tonight (not the one we normally go to) and they had a "free hearing test" sign and hearing booth. No one was working as it was past business hours for that. I grabbed a business card, but left wondering whether or not audiologists run the equipment. They didn't use the term audiologist on the card, though. It says, "Licensed Hearing Instrument Specialist" and the particular person's credentials after their name are "HIS, BA." Huh?

 

I suspect this is not an audiologist, but not sure.

Some caution is likely advisable. Just depend on what it’s for etc.

 

I just went to an appointment with my MIL recently (has severe hearing loss) and went back myself for hearing problems this week (mine is good, just so stopped up from allergies, even on 2 pills and decongestant). These ladies actually have a Doctorate in Audiology (not a BA as the business card stated that you got).

 

A BA is 4 years, but a doctorate entails obtaining a bachelors, masters and doctorate too. So that’s several more years of training and higher level learning.

 

I’m sure it’s geared for them to sell hearing aids and that’s free anywhere if you decide to buy one anyway. (My MIL paid $1900 for one strong enough to help her in one ear! [emoji50])

 

Hope that helps!

 

 

~ HSsquared

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As for what it's for... a while back I looked into auditory processing disorder but in order to test for it you must first have a hearing test. The hearing test on its own had a charge so the thought of getting a free one through Sam's sounded like a great bargain. I was just curious. I know I won't be pursuing any APD testing right now, but wanted to know. Ds had a "hearing test" done at a clinic at a university and then we were told it was technically a screening. I was misled or you could say there was a misunderstanding. An audiologist (not connected to the clinic) explained to me that in order to be a true hearing test it would have been administered by an audiologist. It was not. If ds had any red flags with the screening then they would have moved him onto a full test.

 

He struggles with recalling information he just heard and does appear to have a bit of a memory issue based on test results and my observations (can't remember if this is actual processing speed). At some point I would be curious to see his scores if he took the WISC (to see the processing part of the test) but I can't request it through the school district or the psychologist we saw. They told me the dr decides what tests.

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The hearing test is free, because they make a commission on the hearing instruments that they sell.

The business card is part of the sales pitch.  With BA, they hope that people will think that A stands for Audiology.

With 'Licensed Hearing Instrument Specialist'?   

Specialist sounds better than Sales Representative.

Licensed, just means that the company has appointed them as a Sales Rep.

Licensed to Sell their product.

 

I recently saw a report on these companies.  Which use travelling sales rep's, to sell inferior high priced hearing aids.

They will try to convince people that they need a hearing aid, when they don't.

But once they get your money, they pack and disappear.

 

So that you were fortunate that no one was at the booth, when you came across it.

 

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The hearing test is free, because they make a commission on the hearing instruments that they sell.

The business card is part of the sales pitch.  With BA, they hope that people will think that A stands for Audiology.

With 'Licensed Hearing Instrument Specialist'?   

Specialist sounds better than Sales Representative.

Licensed, just means that the company has appointed them as a Sales Rep.

Licensed to Sell their product.

 

I recently saw a report on these companies.  Which use travelling sales rep's, to sell inferior high priced hearing aids.

They will try to convince people that they need a hearing aid, when they don't.

But once they get your money, they pack and disappear.

 

So that you were fortunate that no one was at the booth, when you came across it.

 

So you think that the booth is only there temporarily? It's inside Sam's. I had never been to this location so I don't know if it's normally there.

 

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Well depending on your insurance and community there are plenty of ways you can get a good hearing test. The schools do them. The pediatrician does a basic one. If your insurance covers it an audiologist can administer it. Here is the thing I am not sure that will get you a CAPD test. Only certain Audiologists administer them and mine was referred from a neuropsych to my pediatrician and then to an audiologist that I had to track down that was out of network. I had to get in network exception since she was the only one in 100 miles that administered the test.  I hope you do not have this many problems. 

 

Something I think is fair to say about APD/CAPD whatever you want to call it these days is that most kids with any other diagnosis have Auditory processing problems. Either phonetic, hearing in noise, binaural listening, auditory memory. Most of these diagnosis are just based on a symptom checksheet. We can't really get inside the brain to know exactly what is going on. CAPD has a specifically fine tuned criteria of listening inside an audio booth with a rigorous criteria. My son has had the diagnosis for over 2 years and I wish he had gotten it sooner but  the test can only be administered by my audiologist once he was 8 or maybe it was 9.  I have had to fight through hell and fire to get therapy for him and most of it I have had to do with training from local SLP's who out of the goodness of their hearts have helped train me.  It has been a slow process of trying to build the weak ares for my son using both top down and bottom up programs

 

So its helpful to have a diagnosis but you also have to have a plan of what you can do once you get it. I have not found the professionals to be that helpful. The audiologist strongly recomended Earobics, Hearbuilder, and accoustic Pioneer, and an app called auditory workout.  I also just found another app for dichotic called Yazziland. 

 

the BrainHQ series for Auditory processing is very good  and cheap at $14 a month.  Here is the full auditory program.  Its for adults but matches the skills in Fastforword ( same designer) almost exactly. I couldn't get my son to stay with BrainHQ so I opted to do FastForword because of the younger interface. It is basically having your child bounce a ball with their ear ten thousand times to train it. Its long and a bit boring but its building a skill. I signed up through a private coach because the year membership was far more affordable and I just have my son doe it daily. The coach sends us updates, reports  and encouragement.  She helps me problem solve where my son is stuck. I actually love her to pieces she has changed so much of how I work with my son and I have a lot of good things to say about the Fastforword program.   In the interest of disclosure this was the program I chose after the ones above because I felt my son needed more ear training that matched his age. I took a chance doing it because of the cost but I do feel he has made significant progress and will know more when we test him in a few months. 

 

 

Also several SLP's have recomended Interactive Metronome for my son because he has low temporal auditory processing ( catching fast moving information) I am planning on trying a home program for that if the testing come back and he still needs improvement. My goal is to improve what he can, compensate for what he can't, and play to his strengths. 

 

 

 

Edited by exercise_guru
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Well depending on your insurance and community there are plenty of ways you can get a good hearing test. The schools do them. The pediatrician does a basic one. If your insurance covers it an audiologist can administer it. Here is the thing I am not sure that will get you a CAPD test. Only certain Audiologists administer them and mine was referred from a neuropsych to my pediatrician and then to an audiologist that I had to track down that was out of network. I had to get in network exception since she was the only one in 100 miles that administered the test.  I hope you do not have this many problems. 

 

Something I think is fair to say about APD/CAPD whatever you want to call it these days is that most kids with any other diagnosis have Auditory processing problems. Either phonetic, hearing in noise, binaural listening, auditory memory. Most of these diagnosis are just based on a symptom checksheet. We can't really get inside the brain to know exactly what is going on. CAPD has a specifically fine tuned criteria of listening inside an audio booth with a rigorous criteria. My son has had the diagnosis for over 2 years and I wish he had gotten it sooner but  the test can only be administered by my audiologist once he was 8 or maybe it was 9.  I have had to fight through hell and fire to get therapy for him and most of it I have had to do with training from local SLP's who out of the goodness of their hearts have helped train me.  It has been a slow process of trying to build the weak ares for my son using both top down and bottom up programs

 

So its helpful to have a diagnosis but you also have to have a plan of what you can do once you get it. I have not found the professionals to be that helpful. The audiologist strongly recomended Earobics, Hearbuilder, and accoustic Pioneer, and an app called auditory workout.  I also just found another app for dichotic called Yazziland. 

 

the BrainHQ series for Auditory processing is very good  and cheap at $14 a month.  Here is the full auditory program.  Its for adults but matches the skills in Fastforword ( same designer) almost exactly. I couldn't get my son to stay with BrainHQ so I opted to do FastForword because of the younger interface. It is basically having your child bounce a ball with their ear ten thousand times to train it. Its long and a bit boring but its building a skill. I signed up through a private coach because the year membership was far more affordable and I just have my son doe it daily. The coach sends us updates, reports  and encouragement.  She helps me problem solve where my son is stuck. I actually love her to pieces she has changed so much of how I work with my son and I have a lot of good things to say about the Fastforword program.   In the interest of disclosure this was the program I chose after the ones above because I felt my son needed more ear training that matched his age. I took a chance doing it because of the cost but I do feel he has made significant progress and will know more when we test him in a few months. 

 

 

Also several SLP's have recomended Interactive Metronome for my son because he has low temporal auditory processing ( catching fast moving information) I am planning on trying a home program for that if the testing come back and he still needs improvement. My goal is to improve what he can, compensate for what he can't, and play to his strengths. 

 

No, I don't have a plan. I guess I can look into those things, though. Thanks. The school district won't do anything for me based on my experience with them. Although, I had a dated report so that had a lot to do with it. I'm not sure if I'll get my follow up or not. It's a long story but ds went to brick and mortar school last year (private). The teacher was supposed to do an eval so I could have some feedback for the eval I had done at a developmental clinic. Lost mail, faxes, summer vacation, you name it got in the way. The clinic has the file now but doubts the dr will see me without charging for a whole new appt. He had agreed to see me to add in her eval but the lady that answered the phone laughed and said she doesn't think so. She said she'd pass on the message and have him get back to me this week. Well it's Friday and I lost my phone yesterday so I don't even know if I can follow up today. Anyway, the pediatrician's office doesn't do hearing tests, not that I'm aware of. For one, they don't have an audiologist working there. They just refer you out for everything. The university clinic had an SLP oversee a student perform the screening (student training to be an SLP). No audiologists in their clinic. They refer out if they need to. Insurance does not cover anything for hearing/ears with the exception of reconstructive type surgery if you had an accident and actually ripped your ear or something. Seriously. The APD clinic does have a place they suggested for hearing tests that's cheaper than them. I can't remember who now. They would accept those results they said. And then all the APD testing is like $700. That is why I never pursued it. For me half the battle is knowing what is up with my son. I just want answers. I know you need a plan but I'm kind of thinking about part A before part B. He did go to several weeks of therapy at the clinic to try to improve retention... but mostly it felt like a waste of time. I drove him an hour each week to meet with them for 50 min. It was included in the fee for his initial testing which was The Auditory Processing Skills test? Or something like that. The name was misleading. They also insisted on adding in other testing to "cover all the bases" which really felt more like, "give the student experience" so they did the Peabody voc. picture book? Totally seemed like a waste to me, but we hung in there to get the memory exercises and then parted ways after the free period ended.

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It’s presumably the same screening that the Pediatrician’s office does, which means it’s only testing a handful of frequencies and at a decibel level that misses mild losses. My daughter passed the screening even though she was profoundly deaf in the high frequencies because they didn’t test the right ones.

 

In my state I could become a hearing aid dispenser with my bachelor’s if I did a supervised clinical practicum. That would allow me to do the screenings and to fit hearing aids for certain types of losses. Not totally sure of the scope of practice. I know my daughter’s loss is such that she needs to see a fully licensed audiologist for her care but most people have milder losses

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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