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Reasonably priced restaurants in NYC, close to Manhattan for a GF family...


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I want to start building a list of places we can eat.  We will have a fridge and microwave in our hotel room.  I assume we can grab granola or something easy for breakfast.  Here's the really hard part - we are 3/5 gluten free, 3/5 Vegetarian, all dairy free (except 3/5 can eat hard cheeses).  So, is anyone brave enough to give suggestions or is it just darn near impossible?

 

I see there is a Chipotle so there is a good start anyway  :laugh:

 

 

 

I am going to put what I am thinking here in a list and add to it as I can, just in case someone else is looking for a similar list in the future.

 

 

Bloom’s Deli (large gluten free menu) 

Inday 

Bistango Italian 

Lilli and Loo - gluten free chinese 

The Little Beet 

The Melt Shop 

The Picnic Basket 

Bareburger - gf veggie burgers, gf buns

Tali (GF dedicated) 

Blank Slate 

Risotteria Melotti 

Friedman’s 

Glaze Teriyaki 

Soho Tiffin Junction 

Delice and Sarrasin 

Keste Pizza 

Caracas Arepa Bar 

Taim Falafel (gf falafel) 

Tu-Lu’s GF Bakery 

 

Edited by Attolia
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My sister lives in Astoria (north of Manhattan a ways) and works in Manhattan as a nanny; she eats out at Bareburger pretty regularly.  They have GF buns and veggie burgers and for the meat eaters, they have bison or (I think) grass-fed beef.

 

The best thing, imo, about NYC, is the food - I would look for hole in the wall ethnic restaurants if possible and just order something without gluten.  Most Asian places won't have a lot of dairy options anyway, if any.

 

But if you have Celiac and cross-contamination is an issue, that is harder to do.

 

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Oh, and for this kind of thing (we have similarly restrictive diets so I do a lot of research when we travel) I like Yelp and I think TripAdvisor - good place to start to weed out local restaurants and find things that can work.  I do a lot of food tourism when we travel :) (even if we're just passing through, if it's somewhere with a vegan bakery I'm trying it out).

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Oh, and for this kind of thing (we have similarly restrictive diets so I do a lot of research when we travel) I like Yelp and I think TripAdvisor - good place to start to weed out local restaurants and find things that can work.  I do a lot of food tourism when we travel :) (even if we're just passing through, if it's somewhere with a vegan bakery I'm trying it out).

 

 

I recently found a little place with gluten free, vegan peanut butter brownies - hallelujah  :laugh:  Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately?) it is like 3 hours from my house so...

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My sister lives in Astoria (north of Manhattan a ways) and works in Manhattan as a nanny; she eats out at Bareburger pretty regularly.  They have GF buns and veggie burgers and for the meat eaters, they have bison or (I think) grass-fed beef.

 

The best thing, imo, about NYC, is the food - I would look for hole in the wall ethnic restaurants if possible and just order something without gluten.  Most Asian places won't have a lot of dairy options anyway, if any.

 

But if you have Celiac and cross-contamination is an issue, that is harder to do.

 

 

Oh my goodness, they have a gluten free veggie burger (I can't find that combo around here).  Bareburger is so going on the list!  Thanks for the thought.

Edited by Attolia
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Hi!

 

Not cheap, but Risotteria Melotti might be worth a splurge for incredible, authentic italian risotto and it is gluten-free. I believe risotto dishes run $20-$25 but it is filling and so delicious.

 

Another place we love is ABC Kitchen for brunch, although I'm not sure about g/f.

Edited by omd21
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I recently found a little place with gluten free, vegan peanut butter brownies - hallelujah  :laugh:  Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately?) it is like 3 hours from my house so...

 

Yes, when we almost moved to Bend, Oregon (we were there for a few weeks), they had a vegan donut shop in town.  With like, normal donuts - not hibiscus mint or macadamia matcha or whatever, but just regular old glazed, chocolate iced, etc. vegan donuts.  And they were cheap(ish).  I gained I think 10 pounds in 3 weeks.  

 

Where we are now, the nearest vegan bakery is 2 hours away, just far enough that I only go every few months (but close enough to get a donut fix every few months).  

Edited by eternalsummer
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Is hummus gluten-free? If it is, you might try one of the many hummus restaurants. Dishes are usually very low priced.

 

There is s Korean mall in the east 30's with reasonably priced food. Is Korean barbecue gluten-free?

 

Pardon my ignorance about avoiding gluten. Not my particular problem, but I do commiserate at how frustrating it can be to eat out when you are trying to avoid particular foods.

 

ETA

 

https://www.timeout.com/newyork/manhattan/koreatown-nyc-neighborhood-guide

Edited by Alessandra
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By Chloe is a vegan fast food restaurant and bakery with locations on Bleecker St and Union Sq. Juice Press, multiple locations, is vegan and has juices, smoothies, soups and salads. Any sushi place will be good as long as you avoid the soy. There are a few frites restaurants, especially in the village, that are vegan and gluten free. Digg Inn has multiple locations serving vegan, gluten free foods as well as meats and grains. Little Beat and Little Beat Table have a similar set up as does Roast Kitchen. The majority of thos restaurants have locations around midtown.

 

I'd personally avoid Senza Gluten in the village, as the old joke goes, "the food is bad, expensive, and the portions are so small ;)"

 

keste pizza on Bleecker St is supposed to have the best gluten free crust and plenty of non-dairy toppings.

 

Hope this helps!

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I took my DD to NYC 10years ago. It was the first time she could order straight from a menu-- best birthday ever. DD has celiac. I planned our meals using Yelp back then, just plugging in diet and dollar restrictions and a got a good selection. Then I put the choices on a map so I could what was near each venue we wanted to visit. Awareness and food choices in restaurants has significantly increased since then so I think you don't have any problem.

 

There's also a gluten free NYC website.

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Wherever we go I tend to always use the reviews at Find Me Gluten Free or their app.  The star ratings themselves aren't perfect, but reading the reviews and then contacting the restaurant has worked well for me.  I pay particular attention to the date of the reviews (since management changes) and whether the reviewers has Celiac.

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Yes, when we almost moved to Bend, Oregon (we were there for a few weeks), they had a vegan donut shop in town.  With like, normal donuts - not hibiscus mint or macadamia matcha or whatever, but just regular old glazed, chocolate iced, etc. vegan donuts.  And they were cheap(ish).  I gained I think 10 pounds in 3 weeks.  

 

Where we are now, the nearest vegan bakery is 2 hours away, just far enough that I only go every few months (but close enough to get a donut fix every few months).  

 

 

 

Oh my goodness, I laughed so hard because I am vegan and I get it  :lol:

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Is hummus gluten-free? If it is, you might try one of the many hummus restaurants. Dishes are usually very low priced.

 

There is s Korean mall in the east 30's with reasonably priced food. Is Korean barbecue gluten-free?

 

Pardon my ignorance about avoiding gluten. Not my particular problem, but I do commiserate at how frustrating it can be to eat out when you are trying to avoid particular foods.

 

ETA

 

https://www.timeout.com/newyork/manhattan/koreatown-nyc-neighborhood-guide

 

 

By Chloe is a vegan fast food restaurant and bakery with locations on Bleecker St and Union Sq. Juice Press, multiple locations, is vegan and has juices, smoothies, soups and salads. Any sushi place will be good as long as you avoid the soy. There are a few frites restaurants, especially in the village, that are vegan and gluten free. Digg Inn has multiple locations serving vegan, gluten free foods as well as meats and grains. Little Beat and Little Beat Table have a similar set up as does Roast Kitchen. The majority of thos restaurants have locations around midtown.

 

I'd personally avoid Senza Gluten in the village, as the old joke goes, "the food is bad, expensive, and the portions are so small ;)"

 

keste pizza on Bleecker St is supposed to have the best gluten free crust and plenty of non-dairy toppings.

 

Hope this helps!

 

 

I took my DD to NYC 10years ago. It was the first time she could order straight from a menu-- best birthday ever. DD has celiac. I planned our meals using Yelp back then, just plugging in diet and dollar restrictions and a got a good selection. Then I put the choices on a map so I could what was near each venue we wanted to visit. Awareness and food choices in restaurants has significantly increased since then so I think you don't have any problem.

 

There's also a gluten free NYC website.

 

 

Wherever we go I tend to always use the reviews at Find Me Gluten Free or their app.  The star ratings themselves aren't perfect, but reading the reviews and then contacting the restaurant has worked well for me.  I pay particular attention to the date of the reviews (since management changes) and whether the reviewers has Celiac.

 

 

 

 

These thoughts are super helpful - thanks ya'll.  Great to know about Senza Gluten because I had it on my list.  Now I will strike it off.  

 

I forgot that By Chloe was in NYC - thanks for the reminder. 

 

It sounds like I can start building a list and we should have way more options than we would here.  Yay!

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reasonably priced and NYC

 

:lol:

 

 

 

I know, right?   :lol:   I guess I should have said " reasonably priced for NYC"  because I know that it will be quite a bit more expensive than here.  I just know that some places in NYC have more dollars signs beside their name than I have ever seen and we aren't up for that.  I would like to stay around $40-55/person per day for lunch and dinner.  We will probably eat more dinner type food for lunch since menu prices are cheaper and grab something like chipotle, a food truck, or something lighter for dinner.  We don't buy drinks.  Food only.  It tends to keep it a little more reasonable. 

Edited by Attolia
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That's a more generous budget than I had imagined. There are zillions of quick food places in east 50's used by office workers, commuters. Restaurant Row in west 40's has bargain price dinners after 8 pm, when theater goers are gone.

 

Lenwich is a chain ds likes, he happens to use one in Greenwich Village. They make salads and hot things to order quickly. You can choose what is included.

 

NYC is actually not that expensive to eat out in. Apartments are so small that people eat out a lot, so competition. I know this is not a gluten free example, but a bagel with cream cheese is cheaper at Lenwich than it is in a similar sit down place here in NJ.

 

Find a place where there are lots of restaurants together, like Indian restaurants in East Village -- I think they are still there on 6th street -- so the restaurants are competing with each other.

 

There is also a wide variety of inexpensive ethnic cuisine in Queens, easy subway from midtown. so worth checking if you have an adventurous palate.

Edited by Alessandra
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That's a more generous budget than I had imagined. There are zillions of quick food places in east 50's used by office workers, commuters. Restaurant Row in west 40's has bargain price dinners after 8 pm, when theater goers ar

 

 

I hoped to keep it lower before I started looking at prices.  Man, NYC is expensive.  

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I hoped to keep it lower before I started looking at prices. Man, NYC is expensive.

Well, I picked this at random.

 

http://simmer-mamouns.s3.amazonaws.com/mamouns/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/2016/02/Mamouns_Menu2017_NEW.pdf

 

Another random

 

http://www.milonny.com

 

I can't remember if I've eaten at either of these, but I have been to similar ones in same area.

Edited by Alessandra
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Those are definitely better prices. I would need to think through if it could work gluten free?

Check the Bangladeshi place I added above too.

 

I am sorry to be so ignorant about gluten free. But I do know you can eat cheaply in NYC.

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Check the Bangladeshi place I added above too.

 

I am sorry to be so ignorant about gluten free. But I do know you can eat cheaply in NYC.

 

 

 

Thanks, I will check it out.  Ethnic food is great because it usually involves rice (GF) but unless it states that it is gluten free, I can't trust the sauce.  Sauces often include soy sauce (wheat) or are thickened with flour.   It is trickier than just avoiding breading, unfortunately  :crying:

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Thanks, I will check it out. Ethnic food is great because it usually involves rice (GF) but unless it states that it is gluten free, I can't trust the sauce. Sauces often include soy sauce (wheat) or are thickened with flour. It is trickier than just avoiding breading, unfortunately :crying:

Oh, I figured out flour-thickened sauces, but I had not realized about soy.

 

I saw an episode on a Netflix food video about a place in England that lied about its ingredients and almost killed a child. (It was a nut allergy.)

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Oh, I figured out flour-thickened sauces, but I had not realized about soy.

 

I saw an episode on a Netflix food video about a place in England that lied about its ingredients and almost killed a child. (It was a nut allergy.)

 

 

Oh bless, how awful.  I am sure that didn't go well for them in the end.

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