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Vent: There are no magic weight loss cures

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I think on Beachbody, to some extent, the issue may not be if it’s a quality program for someone who adheres to it.

 

It is more, is this really a good choice for everyone?

 

And if it is not, is it ethical to hard-sell it?

 

I think the issue is more with the marketing and appropriateness.

 

It’s the same with a lot of things that are selling a fantasy they know is unrealistic for many of the people being targeted.

 

And then if there are certain sales tactics being used, that is an issue.

 

Because for someone who is trying to sell Beachbody products, even if they are true believers, they aren’t out to help someone find the best and most appropriate plan for them.

 

They are out to sell Beachbody products.

 

If somebody is really helpful, only recommends Beachbody to people they think it’s truly a good fit for, etc, then I think that is a different situation.

 

When I have had people try to sell me a supplement (I can’t remember the name) it was really more of a hard sell to anybody.

 

If I had found the same product by doing research it could be good.

 

It could be the same product but the context matters if it’s good or bad for a person, and if it’s really a good choice or someone is using sales tactics.

 

ITA with everything above.

How is that description of Beachbody any different from Weight Watchers or any other program?  I feel sorry for my honest, kind friends who are involved with MLMs they truly believe in, who are not pushy, and who offer but don't shove, if people dislike them just because they are MLM folks.  

I don't dislike people just b/c they sell MLM. I have some friends that sell various things, none of my close friends have tried to hard sell me anything. I do lose respect for people that drink too much cool-aid and push their product on everyone. I lose respect when someone tells me their MLM of choice cures cancer and everything else out there. 

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I think on Beachbody, to some extent, the issue may not be if it’s a quality program for someone who adheres to it.

 

It is more, is this really a good choice for everyone?

 

But there are scores, literally scores of videos to choose from. How is "eat less processed food" not for everyone? You don't have to do Insanity. There are so many choices, from gentle yoga, to ChaLean Extreme, there are modifiers... I dunno, I get that disabled people are going to be unable to do the extreme videos even with mods but frankly our schools use Beachbody (Insanity, P90X, etc.) to train kids and it works.  It's push-ups, pull-ups, chin-ups, running in place, jumping jacks, and eating salmon with greens. And if you do the mods, it's just the movements without jumping. 

 

There is nothing that is for everyone. But I don't think it's unethical to say "oh my gosh, this is the best thing ever, it really works, it's hard core, try it." Especially not when you are talking about something that has a lot of levels, choices, and is eminently basic advice, exercise more, eat better so you can make calories count.

 

And if it is not, is it ethical to hard-sell it?

 

I think the issue is more with the marketing and appropriateness.

 

It’s the same with a lot of things that are selling a fantasy they know is unrealistic for many of the people being targeted....

 

If somebody is really helpful, only recommends Beachbody to people they think it’s truly a good fit for, etc, then I think that is a different situation.

 

I don't think that "more exercise, regular exercise, and a well-balanced, low-processed-food diet" is in any way only appropriate to a few individuals. I think that is the only way to maintain fitness for a lifetime. The only way. Whether you use the Beachbody or Weight Watchers or other program for community support is up to you, but I don't think you can get around it. For some very overweight people, you may only be able to do modified exercises until you lose a lot of weight, and you might need surgery for that. But nobody's stopping you from combining them. In fact my Beachbody coach had weight loss surgery and she fully claimed it. She said she wanted to ramp up intensity and needed to lose weight, got the surgery, and committed to this for life. She's still slim. She works out all the time. That's how you do it. Move all the time. 

When I have had people try to sell me a supplement (I can’t remember the name) it was really more of a hard sell to anybody.

 

The supplements and Shakeology are indeed more of a "magic" cure which I've said.

 

 

I do get what you guys are saying about pushy. However, just as I wouldn't turn anyone away from Weight Watchers, I wouldn't turn anyone away from Beachbody. Ultimately, you're going to lose weight and stay fit (how much depends on your genes and persistence) by moving more and eating less. Eating a varied diet and fresh foods + a daily plan for accountability are the best ways to do that.

 

That is not magic.

 

I can't think of a lot of things I've gotten via direct marketing that I loved, but Beachbody and Girl Scout cookies are two reasons I don't dismiss them out of hand (and YES, Scouts have to buy their cookies up front :/ ).

Edited by Tsuga
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I do get what you guys are saying about pushy. However, just as I wouldn't turn anyone away from Weight Watchers, I wouldn't turn anyone away from Beachbody. Ultimately, you're going to lose weight and stay fit (how much depends on your genes and persistence) by moving more and eating less. Eating a varied diet and fresh foods + a daily plan for accountability are the best ways to do that.

 

That is not magic.

 

I can't think of a lot of things I've gotten via direct marketing that I loved, but Beachbody and Girl Scout cookies are two reasons I don't dismiss them out of hand (and YES, Scouts have to buy their cookies up front :/ ).

 

So if it is that simple, why would anyone need to pay that kind of money for it?  I can find someone for free on-line to talk to and get my own fresh foods.  And then when I screw that up at least I won't be broke on top of it.

 

:laugh:

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I can't think of a lot of things I've gotten via direct marketing that I loved, but Beachbody and Girl Scout cookies are two reasons I don't dismiss them out of hand (and YES, Scouts have to buy their cookies up front :/ ).

The girls don't buy cookies up front, they take orders door to door or online (or at mom and dad's office). The troops can choose to buy cookies up front to set up cookie booths using troop money. In our council, troops can borrow cookies to sell at booths if they don't have the cash up front from the cookie cupboard. Girl Scout cookies are addictive little buggers, but they're not a MLM scheme.

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You wouldn’t turn anyone away from Beachbody? Even if you thought it was a poor fit and a different set-up would be more likely to work?

 

Like my aunt who is 65 years old and walks for exercise and already has people she walks with and it is social for her?

 

And also she did really well with Nutrisystem a couple of years ago?

 

If somebody was hard-selling her Beachbody I can’t see not having an opinion it wouldn’t seem good to her.

 

This is the kind of thing that happened to me with the supplements. They would not be sensible for me. The person trying to sell them to me had no care for that, though.

 

I think those supplements are a fine product too, but when the context is sales tactics it is an entirely different kind of thing.

 

Oh Girl Scout cookies I think they are very over-priced and if I buy them I am buying them to support the Girl Scouts. But they aren’t pretending to care about me or promising me my life will change, nor are they going to expect to get regular orders from me (like monthly as was common for these supplements).

 

This is in retrospect but my son’s OT was the one hawking the supplements. We left the practice after about 3 months, for other reasons totally unrelated, but in retrospect I find it really inappropriate and it has made me have less tolerance for this kind of thing!

 

She wasn’t selling anything for children, at least, at the time I thought “well it’s not like she’s selling stuff for kids.â€

 

But now I have met more OTs and I think any of them would be shocked and appalled.

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You wouldn’t turn anyone away from Beachbody? Even if you thought it was a poor fit and a different set-up would be more likely to work?

 

Like my aunt who is 65 years old and walks for exercise and already has people she walks with and it is social for her?

 

And also she did really well with Nutrisystem a couple of years ago?

 

If somebody was hard-selling her Beachbody I can’t see not having an opinion it wouldn’t seem good to her.

 

This is the kind of thing that happened to me with the supplements. They would not be sensible for me. The person trying to sell them to me had no care for that, though.

 

I think those supplements are a fine product too, but when the context is sales tactics it is an entirely different kind of thing.

 

Oh Girl Scout cookies I think they are very over-priced and if I buy them I am buying them to support the Girl Scouts. But they aren’t pretending to care about me or promising me my life will change, nor are they going to expect to get regular orders from me (like monthly as was common for these supplements).

 

This is in retrospect but my son’s OT was the one hawking the supplements. We left the practice after about 3 months, for other reasons totally unrelated, but in retrospect I find it really inappropriate and it has made me have less tolerance for this kind of thing!

 

She wasn’t selling anything for children, at least, at the time I thought “well it’s not like she’s selling stuff for kids.â€

 

But now I have met more OTs and I think any of them would be shocked and appalled.

I don’t think OT’s (or other types of therapists who are not trained in nutrition) should be in the business of selling supplements. Even though my child has seen improvements from certain supplements so I am supportive of supplementation.

 

If I get certified as a SLP, I would encourage my patients to find a good integrative physician or naturopath who can help them figure out appropriate nutritional support. I think the right supplements can absolutely help a child’s speech but I am studying speech therapy, not nutrition.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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I've tried that one and the extended release - both made me stuck in the bathroom for a week with constant GI issues. I've always wondered if people who find it a magic bullet are immune to the side effects, or if you just suddenly get over them.

I’ve been on it for years and still get the GI issues. Unfortunately it’s the only thing we’ve found, medication or diet, that helps my insulin resistance. I just deal with it at this point.

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It's definitely not cool that their auto-recharge was set up unfairly, but Farmers Insurance and the University of Washington also did that to me so, I dunno, that doesn't strike me as evil. Bad, definitely. But $4m suggests that the court found them to be bad and not purposefully evil--they could have fined much more. $4m would probably cover financial damages and legal fees only, no punitive.

 

I still think the new programs are great and I don't sell it. You don't want to do the same intense workout again and again. The reason they keep developing new programs is that people get bored of the old ones. 

 

And again, if an hour long high-intensity workout six days a week with a low-sugar diet is considered "magic", then I guess I believe in magic. :)

 

I used it to train for a major fitness/outdoors rite of passage here in the PNW and when people heard the program I was using they said "oh, you'll be totally fine".

 

Here is the (free) Insanity nutrition guide:

 

https://vidweb.aws.marketlive.com/beachbody_vid/images/pdf/insanity-xbox-nutrition-guide.pdf

 

It's not easy and nobody says it's easy. I have literally never seen any doctor contradict this eating plan which does not forbid anything but highly processed foods. To wit, my partner and I were relieved when we saw it. "Oh good, it's what we already ate without the occasional crap."

 

Again, I get your point about Shakeology and MLM, totally, but I really, truly do not think anyone at Beachbody is selling magic. They are selling a complete program of hard work, self-restraint, and a community for motivation. Literally the three points any doctor will tell you that you need.

 

If this were a post about MLM I guess I'd be more on board, but if you do all of Insanity or P90X and follow the dietary guidelines (which are, again, eminently reasonable), it is impossible that you don't lose weight and keep it off for the duration of the program. "It works!" because great nutrition and exercise "works". If that doesn't work for you, at the end, you have legitimate proof to bring to your doctor of the workouts you did and meals you ate, and absolute worst case outcome, they will see that you are taking health seriously with a 40 - 120 workout daily and great nutrition.

But, they are soooo blasted pushy.  They are the essential oil shills of the exercise industry.  And they don't get it that there are people out there who will never, ever be able to do their program.  It is a program for healthy, already fit bodies that don't have broken parts. (Yes, I've tried it and needed PT to recover.)  Even if I get bionic knees, new ankles, a new back and new neck, and heal my lung damage, I wouldn't last a week without needing hospitalization.  It's not like I don't exercise.   Perhaps not enough, but I have to balance getting exercise with sleeping without waking up 5 times a night due to pain and being able to walk the dog the next day.  

 

If you can do it, great.  More power to you.  But, I am sick to death of hearing about it and being shamed for rejecting it.  

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The girls don't buy cookies up front, they take orders door to door or online (or at mom and dad's office). The troops can choose to buy cookies up front to set up cookie booths using troop money. In our council, troops can borrow cookies to sell at booths if they don't have the cash up front from the cookie cupboard. Girl Scout cookies are addictive little buggers, but they're not a MLM scheme.

It depends on the council and the troop to a certain extent. My girls didn't have to pay for the cookies up front and our troop didn't either, but a few weeks in, the troop was responsible for the first payment on the cookies we checked out. And my girls checked out cookies from the troop to take with us to sell door-to-door.

 

We had to turn in money or we needed to turn in cookies. Ever since council moved to allow troops and scouts to sell cookies that way, our cookie sales have quadrupled, but they've also had cookies leftover that they ended up donating to the food pantry because troops checked out too many cookies and the baker doesn't take them back.

 

That being said, like you said, it's not an MLM. My girls did not have to recruit people in their downline who then had to recruit people, and so on with the idea that the bigger their downline, the greater their incentive. Their incentives and the amount of money the troop got was based on the number of cookies they sold, not on the number of cookies the people they recruited (and the people they recruited) sold.

 

My issue with Beachbody is that it feeds into the overall fitness and diet culture BS. If what Beachbody was selling was simply the exercise videos, then maybe I'd look kinder on them, but they're not just selling workout videos. They're selling workout videos plus Shakeology while tossing in all of the icky stuff that you get with an MLM. They also prey on people with deceptive before and after pictures by highlighting the "results not typical" people.

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If this were a post about MLM I guess I'd be more on board, but if you do all of Insanity or P90X and follow the dietary guidelines (which are, again, eminently reasonable), it is impossible that you don't lose weight and keep it off for the duration of the program. "It works!" because great nutrition and exercise "works". If that doesn't work for you, at the end, you have legitimate proof to bring to your doctor of the workouts you did and meals you ate, and absolute worst case outcome, they will see that you are taking health seriously with a 40 - 120 workout daily and great nutrition.

 

It doesn't work for everyone. I know this is hard for some people to believe, because most want to believe that all obese people are gluttons, but I really truly did Beachbody (along with over 20k in personal trainers and chefs), and I still couldn't lose weight. I didn't even lose weight on Adderall. Who does that? That's why my endo recommended gastric bypass as a last resort to fight back against PCOS.

 

I am doing all the same things that I did before -- honestly, much less than I did before -- and am finally seeing results.

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