Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

Sign in to follow this  
bethben

State testing whoa!

Recommended Posts

For all of you who have to do standardized tests with your children for compliancy...it could be worse. I opted my dd out of state testing for her public school. I thought maybe 4-6 hours of testing just like we did when we were homeschooling. I just found out the dates dd can stay home or get released early. I just opted her out of 18!!!!! Hours of testing/getting prepped to take the test. How insane is that?

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup.  My son's school does ten hours of testing--and that's just math and English (and no prep).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m not sure how much is really prep (getting pencils sharpened:getting everyone situated). All I know is that next month, my dd has 18 hours less school because of state testing.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I do know here that they are no longer timed (not sure where you are).  So maybe they are just allowing these huge time slots?

 

But yeah that's nuts. 

 

They also test more subjects than English and math.  We only have to test those two.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And good for you!  I would do the same.  I wish I could get away with that as a homeschooler.  Especially because my younger kid gets so stressed out about it (even though he does fine). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I just found out yesterday how SOL's will work for my 8th grader.  They are untimed and each one will start during first period regardless of what class the SOL is for.  He will have a total of 8 SOLs with the way they break out Language Arts. His first two periods are academic and then he has PE and an elective.  I asked if he can start the SOLs after his first two periods and was told no.  The testing coordinator said that the teachers are aware of which students go for SOLs on which days and they don't do a lot in class on the days students are out.  Um, what's the point in coming to class at all during SOLs?  It is so ridiculous.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, it's nuts here how much time goes to testing, campuses being locked down for testing (even if your grade isn't being tested it prohibits things like library, PE, field trips etc. if any grade is undergoing testing) and test prep is even more insane. Locally I want to say there is something like 40 days of devoted test prep. Out of 180. Or they agree to hold that as the limit or something. It was nuts. Testing is one of the top reasons we left PS. When they started revamped the testing methods here in TX all sanity completely left the system. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My DD9 took no less than SIX state tests in first grade.....every six weeks! Plus a beginning of the year and end of the year assessments. None of these were big long tests, probably about 20 to 30 minutes. But the teacher had to either do them with each kid separately, OR they had to be done on the computers in the room. There were 3 computers. There were like 20 kids in the class. The amount of time taken up by assessing the kids reading abilities could have been better used actually teaching them to read.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

. Testing is one of the top reasons we left PS. When they started revamped the testing methods here in TX all sanity completely left the system. 

 

That was a big reason we decided to homeschool, too (Ohio).  Testing and test prep became too much of a focus.  We did opt out of the actual testing but even the test prep both in and out of class was ridiculous.  

 

ETA:  The high-stakes testing also results in way too much stress for students (and teachers), causes students to be pushed into things they aren't developmentally ready for (reading and writing too early, keyboarding), and narrows curriculum down to only/mostly what is tested.

Edited by Kassia
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow. :( It's not like that in the public high school here (idk about elementary or middle school).

 

There's been an occasional mandated test, yes, but DS's teachers clearly don't think much of them. They are too busy actually teaching their classes to bother with putting much into mandated assessments. DS tells me they've never spent any time on prepping for the STARR tests at all. There only 3 per year in math and English, and only for freshmen and sophomores. That's it as far as non-class tests go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Locally I want to say there is something like 40 days of devoted test prep.

What does this mean exactly? Do they spend half the day or more on test prep for those 40 days? Any chance that it means 40 days of twenty minutes per day of test prep? I can’t even fathom spending eight entire school weeks doing mostly test prep.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What does this mean exactly? Do they spend half the day or more on test prep for those 40 days? Any chance that it means 40 days of twenty minutes per day of test prep? I can’t even fathom spending eight entire school weeks doing mostly test prep.

 

I just tried to look online to get the quote, but they've removed mentions of testing from the ISD website. I can't even find the test dates for this year.......My understanding from the admin here (at the time) was that they could spend no more than 40 total school days devoted to test prep, (mind you that's not testing) which I assumed to be hours total throughout the year that would total up to 40 x whatever they consider a school days (7 hours? 6.5?) . But they were a lot more intense than 20 minutes a day. They definitely had days that were mostly devoted to prep at least in the subjects being tested on State exams. I got particularly tired of "Testing Strategy" worksheets coming home in elementary. 

 

They were huge on benchmark tests here leading up to the standardized tests in the Spring, which also were counted in the testing prep, as far as the prep for them. When we left they had benchmarks every six weeks. And for those benchmarks, they also had practice tests, and of course, practice standardized tests too on top of that. It was insane, but it's because they were a top ranked school and I'm sure the pressure there to succeed for teachers and admins was enormous. As I mentioned in the other thread, our teachers in this district are on one-year contracts. There is no job security, so if your class doesn't perform you're out and there are teachers lined up to come work here because it's a good district with good pay compared to a lot of the local districts. They can cherry pick. Our property values are really high in comparison to other districts because of the schools and their testing scores. 

 

We left when STAAR was just being implemented, and they were only administering two subject tests at that time. They're giving a lot more subject tests now, so not sure what it's like. I seriously doubt the pressure has decreased, especially since the Legislature pushed through a new, tougher, school grading system last year. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...