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The Man/Child, The MRI, and the Ugggg: Update of sorts in 40


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The man/child hurt his back about 18 months ago.  He was helping me in the garden and was moving rocks in the 15-20 lb range. He didn't lift with his knees...someone asked him why. He said the rock didn't come with a warning label.

 

I figured it would get better in a week or two. So, we did the ice, then heat, ibuprofen, etc.  It improved a bit for awhile.

 

Then it worsened and we saw a chiropractor.   In the last year, he has seen two different chiropractors, 2 different massage therapists, and finally a new physical therapist, taken a slew of NSAIDs and used a TENS unit.

 

All this time, he has been a competitive figure skater and gymnast.   In fact he just landed his first double back layout with a full twist.  (Once he is 'warmed up' he is relatively pain-free.)  But, when not pushing and pumping adrenaline, he is in constant pain. he just turned 17 and he hurts like an old man all day long.

 

Our PCP just recently referred him to a PT who wanted an MRI before he started working on him.

 

We got the results.  :crying:   My competitive, athletic son has arthritis, two inflamed discs, one bulging, as well as a congenital narrowing of the spinal canal all exacerbated by severe muscular 'guarding'.  The worst of it is that he wants 6 months of absolute rest for healing before he starts to work on his back.  The only treatment he recommends is massage and dry needle acupuncture. 

 

I just can't imagine kiddo having 6 more months of pain before anyone starts trying to 'fix' him.  I also can't imagine him with 6 months of physical down-time.   Even with the pain he has now, the only relief he finds is at the gym.

 

I know we need a second opinion but I don't know where to go or who to see.  We have a very small pool of medical specialists here so options aren't terrific. 

 

I'm open to any ideas and thoughts people might have.  I would love some good ideas for supplements that might help with joint, cartilage, and bone health as well as anything that might benefit inflammation.

 

My person belief is that working to build core strength will help support his spine and would be beneficial.  Working to decrease inflammation would be a good thing.  Anything else I'm missing?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Tammi K
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I'd get him out of figure skating and gymnastics. Would he go for swimming? Maybe that would be a way for him to stay active without doing further damage.

 

Yes get a second opinion but sometimes the body does just need a break. A good long one.

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I would look around for a DO - doctor of Osteopathic medicine or a Orthopedic doctor. Or even a doctor that specializes in sports medicine. A PT is probably going to part of the solution, but I think you need to have him checked out by someone who can address the different problems involved - pain, inflammation, bulging disks, etc.

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My ballerina tends to get tense and pulls her back out of whack. She gets great relief from Pilates. We have a great instructor that she sees for private lessons (it helps a lot that she was a ballet dancer herself) or small group reformer classes. There’s a figure skater that attends class with her.

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Physical therapy with traction can really help with disc pain and compression. Magnesium has shown to be helpful in healing back issues. A good quality collagen powder is excellent for joints, etc. He needs rest to let the discs heal. Muscles will spasm around the injured discs as a protective measure to limit movement and guard against further damage. Lots of rest, ice/heat, and massage therapy would be helpful.

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I'd be really careful with this.  I understand why you want to start doing something now, but if the doctor is right you could make things a lot worse.  It sounds like he needs the inflammation and tissues to be in better shape before he can do anything.

 

I'd get a second opinion, but I'd avoid chiros or osteopaths, and I'd only do pilates etc if you can find someone with experience modifying them for injuries like that.

 

Swimming might be a good option for physical activity. i find with my arthritis it's important to keep some activity, or I step to get stiff.  It's kind of a balance though, you don't want to make it worse.

 

 

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The man/child hurt his back about 18 months ago.  He was helping me in the garden and was moving rocks in the 15-20 lb range. He didn't lift with his knees...someone asked him why. He said the rock didn't come with a warning label.

 

I figured it would get better in a week or two. So, we did the ice, then heat, ibuprofen, etc.  It improved a bit for awhile.

 

Then it worsened and we saw a chiropractor.   In the last year, he has seen two different chiropractors, 2 different massage therapists, and finally a new physical therapist, taken a slew of NSAIDs and used a TENS unit.

 

All this time, he has been a competitive figure skater and gymnast.   In fact he just landed his first double back layout with a full twist.  (Once he is 'warmed up' he is relatively pain-free.)  But, when not pushing and pumping adrenaline, he is in constant pain. he just turned 17 and he hurts like an old man all day long.

 

Our PCP just recently referred him to a PT who wanted an MRI before he started working on him.

 

We got the results.  :crying:   My competitive, athletic son has arthritis, two inflamed discs, one bulging, as well as a congenital narrowing of the spinal canal all exacerbated by severe muscular 'guarding'.  The worst of it is that he wants 6 months of absolute rest for healing before he starts to work on his back.  The only treatment he recommends is massage and dry needle acupuncture. 

 

I just can't imagine kiddo having 6 more months of pain before anyone starts trying to 'fix' him.  I also can't imagine him with 6 months of physical down-time.   Even with the pain he has now, the only relief he finds is at the gym.

 

I know we need a second opinion but I don't know where to go or who to see.  We have a very small pool of medical specialists here so options aren't terrific. 

 

I'm open to any ideas and thoughts people might have.  I would love some good ideas for supplements that might help with joint, cartilage, and bone health as well as anything that might benefit inflammation.

 

My person belief is that working to build core strength will help support his spine and would be beneficial.  Working to decrease inflammation would be a good thing.  Anything else I'm missing?

 

It sounds pretty clear that if he doesn't stop and let his body heal, his pain is likely to get progressively worse over time. I know it hurts when your kid is hurting and you want to be able to fix it right now (my DD suffers from chronic pain), but some things do not have quick fixes. You need to stop and think about what you hope his quality of life is going to be in ten years or twenty, not just tomorrow or next week.

 

I would enforce the medical orders--and in the mean time, help him with dietary support. DH was a very athletic teenager, and when he was in a car accident in his very early 20's, the forced inactivity together with the diet he was accustomed to--the appropriate diet for an athlete with all its calories--put a lot of weight on him which he has been fighting a losing battle against ever since.

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It sounds like he really does need total rest for 6 months.  In the meantime I would get another opinion, probably from the best orthopedic surgeon you can find in the area.  Don't just ask other patients, ask medical professionals.  Ask physical therapists and nurses and doctors.  Then go see the surgeon.  They will know if rest, traction, and gentle exercises like walking or swimming is allowed or if he really should do NOTHING for 6 months. And they may be able to recommend a more specialized PT.

 

You might also want to find him a cognitive therapist to help him get through the six months, as well as the realization that skating might be over for him. Or at least if he wants to avoid a wheelchair by 40 he may want to choose to retire from skating. I only had a few knee surgeries as a young athlete but those 4-6 months of limited movement were psychologically excruciating at the time.

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My DD was recently referred to a pediatric pain clinic. They set her up with PT, OT, a consult between her current therapist and the pediatric pain psychologist, and she's going to attend a pain management support group for teens. If there is anything like that in your area, it might be a resource worth looking in to.

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Along with an orthopedist, is there a regional pain specialist in your area (if needed)? Oldest dd was referred to one for deep pain in one thigh - MRI, X-rays etc found nothing to treat, and PT only did so much. Pain doc. was ultimately able to help her with deep injections (botox? I do not remember) that lasted about six weeks. She ultimately decided she would rather live with the pain - easy once you KNOW it is not cancer or anything dire - than Big Needles (aargh!) every six weeks.

 

If PT and/or orthos do not address the pain well in a few months, then you may need a pain doc.

 

Poor kid. Sounds like he just lost his physical activities for several months (if not permanently). Swimming may be an option once he is cleared for it. My mom had to have spinal fusion in her early 30s, and we ended up moving to find a house with room for a pool, so she could swim her daily laps w/o throwing three kids in the car to get to the local pool. Swimming was good for her back, I think.

Edited by JFSinIL
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I agree with finding a good orthopedic surgeon that frequently handles young athletes, not just the 50+ crowd.  Not to jump to surgery right away, but arthritis of the spine, stenosis, and disc degeneration is basically a ticking clock toward eventual surgery.   It's likely now a lifetime of kicking the next procedure as far down the road as possible.  DH has the same conditions, and a fusion two years ago gave him his life back, although he hasn't tried to swing a golf club yet.  Swimming was the easiest exercise on his back.  I'd certainly want a second opinion on the six months of total rest, for sure.  Letting his core muscles that support his back have six months off might hurt more than help.

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Yes, definitely a second opinion, even if for just ease of mind that the plan is on the right track. I would seek out a spine surgeon, even if you have to travel. Ask around, ask everyone you know for recommendations. 

 

DH bulging disk finally felt better after about 2-3 weeks of ibuprofen every 8 hours consistently, muscle relaxers, epidural injection, frequent PT and PT massage and alternating heat and ice. He had numb and tingly feet, so he was very close to needing surgery but the inflammation finally decreased before that point. The surgeon recommended micro surgery with very short recovery time, but luckily was able to avoid that (for now). I would also not go to a chiropractor for this diagnosis. 

 

I would absolutely not let him return to his activities until a second opinion is sought. 

 

 

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If you lived in my area or wanted to travel to NYC, I would suggest you take him to the Hospital for Special Surgery in Manhattan.

 

These are real and serious medical problems. This isn’t the time for chiropractors and physical therapists. It just isn’t.

 

Your ds needs to be seen by the very best neurosurgeon who is also spinal specialist.

 

I’m not saying that your son will need surgery, but a good surgeon will know what he does and doesn’t need. Your son may need spinal injections to try to treat the symptoms of what sounds like stenosis (the congenital narrowing) but I’m no expert, so I’m only guessing about that. The important thing is that if he does need treatments and/or injections, he needs to get them from the best and most qualified professional, because there are serious risks to being treated by the wrong person.

 

I’m not trying to scare you, but your son’s issues aren’t some minor injury. This is the kind of thing that can affect him for life, and that’s why I’m so concerned about him going to an excellent spinal center and not just to a GP, a chiropractor, or a physical therapist who isn’t directly prescribed by the spinal specialist, because they really aren't qualified to treat your son’s condition.

Edited by Catwoman
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My heart just aches for him.  He must be very talented and it sounds like he has a passion for his sports.  Unfortunately, those sports are probably the worst for his back.  All that pounding is likely to continue to make things worse.  I am surprised that they would recommend total rest from sports, though, with arthritis.  Not moving is really bad for arthritis ... it decreases range of motion. I have arthritis in my spine and bulging and degenerating discs.  Not moving means more pain and reduced function.   I would think that more gentle to the spine movement would help.  I'm not a doctor, nor do I play one on TV, but I have read that yoga (a more gentle practice) is very good for healing issues in the spine.  I know that it is very helpful for me.  I can't do the more athletic yoga due to knee issues, but a good restorative yoga done at my own abilities has helped immensely.

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The man/child hurt his back about 18 months ago.  He was helping me in the garden and was moving rocks in the 15-20 lb range. He didn't lift with his knees...someone asked him why. He said the rock didn't come with a warning label.

 

I figured it would get better in a week or two. So, we did the ice, then heat, ibuprofen, etc.  It improved a bit for awhile.

 

Then it worsened and we saw a chiropractor.   In the last year, he has seen two different chiropractors, 2 different massage therapists, and finally a new physical therapist, taken a slew of NSAIDs and used a TENS unit.

 

All this time, he has been a competitive figure skater and gymnast.   In fact he just landed his first double back layout with a full twist.  (Once he is 'warmed up' he is relatively pain-free.)  But, when not pushing and pumping adrenaline, he is in constant pain. he just turned 17 and he hurts like an old man all day long.

 

Our PCP just recently referred him to a PT who wanted an MRI before he started working on him.

 

We got the results.  :crying:   My competitive, athletic son has arthritis, two inflamed discs, one bulging, as well as a congenital narrowing of the spinal canal all exacerbated by severe muscular 'guarding'.  The worst of it is that he wants 6 months of absolute rest for healing before he starts to work on his back.  The only treatment he recommends is massage and dry needle acupuncture. 

 

I just can't imagine kiddo having 6 more months of pain before anyone starts trying to 'fix' him.  I also can't imagine him with 6 months of physical down-time.   Even with the pain he has now, the only relief he finds is at the gym.

 

I know we need a second opinion but I don't know where to go or who to see.  We have a very small pool of medical specialists here so options aren't terrific. 

 

I'm open to any ideas and thoughts people might have.  I would love some good ideas for supplements that might help with joint, cartilage, and bone health as well as anything that might benefit inflammation.

 

My person belief is that working to build core strength will help support his spine and would be beneficial.  Working to decrease inflammation would be a good thing.  Anything else I'm missing?

 

 

Oh No.  The fact is some people have bad backs.  And when they find that out they need to be very careful about how they treat their body for the rest of their lives.  My dh, when young, did EVERYTHING.  Full throttle all of the time.  Biking, motorcycles, skiing, and hard hard physical labor in construction.  At 50 he is in terrible shape.  By 30 he had broken his back trying to lift something too heavy and it almost paralyzed him.  He has a double fusion in his lower back and one above it is now bulging.  He needs another fusion. But he just had a full knee replacement last summer and isn't ready for more surgery yet.  

 

As for your son.  LISTEN to the advice to rest for 6 months.  Your son has to face the fact he cannot do the skating and the gymnastics.  Probably ever.  He can face this fact now or he can do more and more damage to himself.  

 

A second opinion would be fine, but honestly the opinion you have sounds spot on to me.  Your son needs rest.  And he needs to focus on making a living that does not require much physically.  And he needs to find a way to exercise that will not further damage his body.  Swimming is probably best.  But he would need to not over do even swimming.  He probably shouldn't even be swimming through this 'rest' period.  But ask.  Walking is good for a bad back.  (but ask the doctor how much, how fast ect for the rest period) .

 

I am sorry OP.  I wish it wasn't so.  I hope your son will listen to the medical advice.  My dh never has.  I have to learn to let it go and let him make his own choices.  

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My heart just aches for him.  He must be very talented and it sounds like he has a passion for his sports.  Unfortunately, those sports are probably the worst for his back.  All that pounding is likely to continue to make things worse.  I am surprised that they would recommend total rest from sports, though, with arthritis.  Not moving is really bad for arthritis ... it decreases range of motion. I have arthritis in my spine and bulging and degenerating discs.  Not moving means more pain and reduced function.   I would think that more gentle to the spine movement would help.  I'm not a doctor, nor do I play one on TV, but I have read that yoga (a more gentle practice) is very good for healing issues in the spine.  I know that it is very helpful for me.  I can't do the more athletic yoga due to knee issues, but a good restorative yoga done at my own abilities has helped immensely.

 

I found that when I was having some back problems, yoga made them a lot worse.  Which surprised me.  And it wasn't obvious while I was in the class, either, I'd feel find and like I was being careful.  It was a few hours later or in the night.

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If you lived in my area or wanted to travel to NYC, I would suggest you take him to the Hospital for Special Surgery in Manhattan.

 

These are real and serious medical problems. This isn’t the time for chiropractors and physical therapists. It just isn’t.

 

Your ds needs to be seen by the very best neurosurgeon who is also spinal specialist.

 

I’m not saying that your son will need surgery, but a good surgeon will know what he does and doesn’t need. Your son may need spinal injections to try to treat the symptoms of what sounds like stenosis (the congenital narrowing) but I’m no expert, so I’m only guessing about that. The important thing is that if he does need treatments and/or injections, he needs to get them from the best and most qualified professional, because there are serious risks to being treated by the wrong person.

 

I’m not trying to scare you, but your son’s issues aren’t some minor injury. This is the kind of thing that can affect him for life, and that’s why I’m so concerned about him going to an excellent spinal center and not just to a GP, a chiropractor, or a physical therapist who isn’t directly prescribed by the spinal specialist, because they really aren't qualified to treat your son’s condition.

 

I absolutely agree with this. This is very serious. If at all possible, consider traveling to the best back/spine specialists you can find. He is young, good treatment now can minimize existing damage and teach him how to take care of his body so that it doesn't sustain more damage than what naturally occurs with aging. Without adequate treatment, I fear he will be in a wheelchair sooner rather than later.

 

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We had trouble getting a referral for the neurosurgeon without starting with imaging, PT, and chiropractic first. The GP didn’t know enough to know what was needed, so the treatment ladder started with x rays and an MRI with the chiro and PT, then the pain and spinal clinic and neurosurgeon evaluating what was needed in terms of the spine. No ortho.

It’s terrible that you had to jump through hoops just to get the referral!

 

In this case, though, Tammi’s son has already had the MRI and the results show multiple serious conditions, so I would think he would have no problem being referred to a neurosurgeon who is also a spinal specialist. It’s what he needs, and I believe it’s what Tammi should insist upon.

 

Tammi’s son has issues that could permanently affect his mobility, and that could also leave him with lifelong chronic pain if the problems are not addressed quickly and correctly. I would never trust a chiropractor or a physical therapist to even get near him without seeing a very highly regarded spinal specialist first. They simply don’t have the expertise.

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It’s terrible that you had to jump through hoops just to get the referral!

 

In this case, though, Tammi’s son has already had the MRI and the results show multiple serious conditions, so I would think he would have no problem being referred to a neurosurgeon who is also a spinal specialist. It’s what he needs, and I believe it’s what Tammi should insist upon.

 

Tammi’s son has issues that could permanently affect his mobility, and that could also leave him with lifelong chronic pain if the problems are not addressed quickly and correctly. I would never trust a chiropractor or a physical therapist to even get near him without seeing a very highly regarded spinal specialist first. They simply don’t have the expertise.

 

 

I missed that it was the PT who requested 6 months rest before the 'start working with him.'  I agree no one needs to 'work with him' until he has seen a specialist on spinal issues.  The rest period is probably still a good idea and it takes so long to get an appt with a specialist anyway....so he can be resting while he waits.

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I missed that it was the PT who requested 6 months rest before the 'start working with him.' I agree no one needs to 'work with him' until he has seen a specialist on spinal issues. The rest period is probably still a good idea and it takes so long to get an appt with a specialist anyway....so he can be resting while he waits.

:iagree:

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My husband has similar issues. The last bulging disc herniated in the most epic fashion; it left him laying on the floor on his belly and me calling 911 for them to come peel him off the floor. At that time, steroids and muscle relaxers made a huge difference. We're dealing with military doctors, though, so he waited six weeks for the MRI and then two more weeks for surgery, ending up in nerve damage.

 

He had the surgery done in Anchorage with Dr. Euley at Orthopedic Physicians Alaska. Afterwards he was told even running was out of the picture for him.

 

Absolutely take this seriously. Degenerative disk disease is a lifelong thing.

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It’s terrible that you had to jump through hoops just to get the referral!

 

In this case, though, Tammi’s son has already had the MRI and the results show multiple serious conditions, so I would think he would have no problem being referred to a neurosurgeon who is also a spinal specialist. It’s what he needs, and I believe it’s what Tammi should insist upon.

 

Tammi’s son has issues that could permanently affect his mobility, and that could also leave him with lifelong chronic pain if the problems are not addressed quickly and correctly. I would never trust a chiropractor or a physical therapist to even get near him without seeing a very highly regarded spinal specialist first. They simply don’t have the expertise.

 

Agreed.  100%.

 

This could affect his quality of life forever.  This is serious and needs experts that are trained in these specific issues.

 

:grouphug:  :grouphug:  :grouphug:

 

I know this is scary, OP, but I would absolutely do the following:

 

1.  Immediately cut out his activities.  Yes that really, really sucks but he is almost certainly causing more damage.

2.  Get him referred to specialists ASAP and I don't mean chiropractors and PTs.  I understand why those were sought out but his issues go way beyond their areas of expertise.  Be prepared to go out of the area if necessary.  He needs solid answers now.

3.  Help him to see that this is not to make life easier in the moment but to improve his long term quality of life.  Preventive steps and proactive steps now could make all the difference in giving him a chance at a normal, healthy, happy life and may help him eventually return to a much more active lifestyle but continuing to do what he is currently doing could cause permanent, irreparable damage.

4.  Definitely get a second opinion regarding no activity whatsoever.  Yes, I would absolutely cut out activity right now.  His body needs time to genuinely heal.  Eventually, though, returning to appropriate forms of activity may absolutely be the way to go.  The question is what would be appropriate and when.  Until you have better answers there, and see how he responds to rest and appropriate treatment, though, I would hesitate to let him do much of anything even remotely strenuous for at least a few weeks.  Not even reaching into high cabinets or lifting even something as heavy as a textbook.  His body is in crisis and needs time to try and heal.

5.  Going from a ton of physical activity that he really enjoys to absolutely none of those things will be HARD.  Hard on him physically and mentally.  But being proactive can help him with the transition.  Talk with a dietician about adjusting caloric intake so that weight gain does not compound his issues.  Consider counseling for depression.  And work really hard with him to find other things to occupy his time and help him to still feel productive and good about himself.

 

:grouphug:  :grouphug:  :grouphug:

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I'm sorry to hear that your son is in so much pain!  

 

You asked about supplements, but please make sure to check with his doctor to make sure a supplement won't interact badly with what he already takes for pain.      

 

My husband has just started taking a supplement to see if it helps with his knee pain, but It's too soon to know if it's helping or not.   I saw it on tv (Evine home shopping) and it's called Consult Health Joint Solution.  You can read about it on the Evine website if you want to see what's in it.  I know that it includes turmeric, which is supposed to help with inflammation. 

 

Sometimes I make turmeric tea using Dr. Weil's directions.  (dr weil dot com)    I have to admit that I don't  like the taste, though.    

 

    

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On the subject of reducing inflammation, he could try CuraPro or other highly concentrated turmeric / curcumin supplements. Would a styrofoam roller be beneficial? If so, they are inexpensive and easy to get online or any sports store.

 

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Tumeric isn’t very bioavailable. I kinda scoff at the fad of tumeric tea. Something heavily concentrated and standardized (like c-95 compound tumeric) at high doses—like 1000mg a day has a shot at mildly helping. My rheumatologist has me on that plus high doses of fish oil. It’s not without consequences though as it is still a type of medicine, and it’s not the only thing I am doing.

 

But, seriously, I don’t think any of us are spinal surgeons or neuro-orthopedists. Go see a specialist.

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My husband has similar issues. The last bulging disc herniated in the most epic fashion; it left him laying on the floor on his belly and me calling 911 for them to come peel him off the floor. At that time, steroids and muscle relaxers made a huge difference. We're dealing with military doctors, though, so he waited six weeks for the MRI and then two more weeks for surgery, ending up in nerve damage.

 

He had the surgery done in Anchorage with Dr. Euley at Orthopedic Physicians Alaska. Afterwards he was told even running was out of the picture for him.

 

Absolutely take this seriously. Degenerative disk disease is a lifelong thing.

 

Quoting this to emphasize a doctor with experience in the area.  At the very least if it's beyond the scope, Dr Euley should be able to refer your DS to someone.

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I've been on the phone all morning getting referrals, sending records, etc.  And, as luck would have it, my older son's girlfriend works for a neurologist and her boss is going to take a look at his images and let us know where he thinks we should go.  But, the good news that I am hearing is that while a rest from gymnastics and skating may be required,  developing a strong ( or in his case, stronger) core and a good stretching program is very beneficial.  

 

I did locate a practice here that does a lot of spine work and has sport medicine doctors on staff.   It would have been easier if they had the word 'spine' in their practice name. 

 

So, we have some good leads and some referrals being sent out.  Hopefully we will get a new direction and some solid advice. 

 

Funny side note - I mentioned that several people mentioned that swimming might be a good alternative while his back heals.  He said that sounded good to him and then asked if that included diving because that wold be a cool alternative sport.  :001_rolleyes:

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I've been on the phone all morning getting referrals, sending records, etc.  And, as luck would have it, my older son's girlfriend works for a neurologist and her boss is going to take a look at his images and let us know where he thinks we should go.  But, the good news that I am hearing is that while a rest from gymnastics and skating may be required,  developing a strong ( or in his case, stronger) core and a good stretching program is very beneficial.  

 

I did locate a practice here that does a lot of spine work and has sport medicine doctors on staff.   It would have been easier if they had the word 'spine' in their practice name. 

 

So, we have some good leads and some referrals being sent out.  Hopefully we will get a new direction and some solid advice. 

 

Funny side note - I mentioned that several people mentioned that swimming might be a good alternative while his back heals.  He said that sounded good to him and then asked if that included diving because that wold be a cool alternative sport.  :001_rolleyes:

 

 

Ha.Tell him NO it cannot include diving!

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Oh one more thing... make sure he writes down any specific areas of new or increasing numbness or pain, especially in the legs and feet. I had DH write out before his appointments any new or worsening issues or questions, because he would inevitably go in on a good day and forget things. Plus, even though he wasn't on narcotics most of the time, the meds and/or pain levels could make him forgetful or mask symptoms during the day.

Edited by BarbecueMom
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Update of sorts:  Still waiting for a spinal orthopedist appointment but had the scans read by a neurologist today.  He said that with the way his scans look, he might as well be a sky diver...he has way more damage than would be expected for a 17 year old kid.    However, the irony about this whole situation is that the pain he is experiencing is from the muscles rather than the spine.  So, if we hadn't had the muscle injury, there would have been no scans to pick up the spinal issue until the impingement had progressed to a dangerous point.

 

So, at present man/child will definitely be looking at extensive PT along with reduced impact activities otherwise, he says that surgery will be in his future sooner rather than later.   :sad:

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Update of sorts: Still waiting for a spinal orthopedist appointment but had the scans read by a neurologist today. He said that with the way his scans look, he might as well be a sky diver...he has way more damage than would be expected for a 17 year old kid. However, the irony about this whole situation is that the pain he is experiencing is from the muscles rather than the spine. So, if we hadn't had the muscle injury, there would have been no scans to pick up the spinal issue until the impingement had progressed to a dangerous point.

 

So, at present man/child will definitely be looking at extensive PT along with reduced impact activities otherwise, he says that surgery will be in his future sooner rather than later. :sad:

I only liked your post to be supportive — I sure don’t “like†what is happening to your poor son! :crying:

 

The one good thing here is that you’re getting the information you need to help him and to prevent further damage. As you said, without the muscle injury, you might not have known how bad things really are — and you might not have known until it was too late to do anything about it.

 

I’m so sorry. Tammi. What a shock to your family. :grouphug:

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What a blessing he found out now instead of later though! It sounds like he just got dealt a crappy back, which injuries exacerbated. Still I’m so glad you were able to get hooked up with the right resources. Which spine practice did you end up using?

 

He has an appointment tomorrow with Alaska Fracture and Orthopedic Clinic.  I've heard good things about their sports medicine guy.

 

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