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vaquitita

Looking for something similar to Brave writer but less mom dependent...

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I'm looking for writing program for my 12 year old. This year we've been doing Brave writer and it's the first time he has enjoyed writing, but we've had a bunch of family emergencies come up and it's just not getting done. So I'm looking for something that would appeal to him but be a little more independent. I'm not looking for completely hands off but it needs to be something that's not totally mom driven either. Last spring we tried IEW SWI-B, but while he enjoyed Andrew Pudewa's sense of humor, the writing process itself was torturous.

 

I have writing strands, but have never tried it. Is that what I'm looking for? The recent thread on CAPs writing and rhetoric has peaked my interest as well. Something like IEW or WWS would not suit this kid at all, but I do need open and go so that it actually gets done.

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Take a Bravewriter class and outsource to someone else? It’s going to be more expensive, but then you can still keep what you like while also allowing someone else to mentor your young writer.

Edited by mamaraby
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We're BW people, and we really liked Twisting Arms for persuasive writing this year. However, it's really only a quarter-long curriculum. 

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Take a Bravewriter class and outsource to someone else? It’s going to be more expensive, but then you can still keep what you like while also allowing someone else to mentor your young writer.

 

:iagree:

 

If you can swing it try a class. They aren't typically a full semester and might give things a chance to settle down and then you can return to BW yourself. Their online classes are excellent. 

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What about Cover Story?  I'm not saying it's BW philosophy, but I think it could be more independent and it is creative.  (I haven't used it, but I have an older student using One Year Adventure Novel)

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What Brave Writer programs are you using? My 13 year old basically completes Faltering Ownership and Arrows/Boomerangs largely by herself. We do have discussions and she will come to me if you has any questions.  For the most part, she is working independently. If that is not possible, then I have heard the BW classes are wonderful. 

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If you do a BW class, be sure you're doing one of the ones that does teach to the student since you're hoping to be a little more hands off.

 

But I agree with the above that we do things BW style and my kids do a lot independently.

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What Brave Writer programs are you using? My 13 year old basically completes Faltering Ownership and Arrows/Boomerangs largely by herself. We do have discussions and she will come to me if you has any questions. For the most part, she is working independently. If that is not possible, then I have heard the BW classes are wonderful.

If you do a BW class, be sure you're doing one of the ones that does teach to the student since you're hoping to be a little more hands off.

 

But I agree with the above that we do things BW style and my kids do a lot independently.

Well it's not hands off because I'm combining all my kids in BW. We're using Partnership Writing and alternating between Arrow and Quiver.

 

I'm going to have to give this some thought, about how to have him do it on his own...

Edited by vaquitita

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I'm using Partnership Writing with my 10 year old and Faltering Ownership with my 12  year old and they are essentially doing it on their own, as this is stuff that is assigned to them in the mornings when I am at work.  I try to give them a big picture idea of the project on the weekend before we start a new project.  Then I break it down into smaller chunks (either daily for the 10 year old or weekly for the 12 year old) and have them work on that - I'll ask to see work every 2-3 days and give some feedback, figure out if they need any additional resources, point them in the direction of any changes that might need to be incorporated.  It takes us 3-4 weeks to do a project and I find that I really need to focus on giving direction during the first week and as long as they have a strong base, they are usually ready to take off on their own.

 

FWIW, I'm also using CAP W & R with the 12 year old and we get that done in the afternoons when I'm home because we complete a lot of it as oral discussion, I read her the story that kicks off the chapter out loud, there are often parts that require her to recite things to me etc.  She can do the written portions on her own but I find my contribution is needed on an almost daily basis (we aim to complete a chapter in one week - that's usually 4 days for us as one day a week is inevitably allotted to some outside activity).

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Then I break it down into smaller chunks (either daily for the 10 year old or weekly for the 12 year old) and have them work on that - I'll ask to see work every 2-3 days and give some feedback, figure out if they need any additional resources, point them in the direction of any changes that might need to be incorporated.

Thank you for sharing your schedule, that's very helpful.

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If you do a BW class, be sure you're doing one of the ones that does teach to the student since you're hoping to be a little more hands off.

 

But I agree with the above that we do things BW style and my kids do a lot independently.

I will have to look at the classes again. I was wanting to do the Brave Writer online, but that is a class for the parent. He did do the arrow class last month and the movie club this month, I can't say that I feel like he's really engaging in it so far. But that may just take time.

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Write and ask Julie or whoever is answering questions there these days about online classes and see what would be a good fit. Just say that you want him to do more, you feel like you are able to facilitate it and don't need a class for the parents, it's just that you're pressed for time. I think some parents want to just hand off writing and it's a tough thing to really hand off - investment is really payoff when it comes to writing. But on the other hand, we all have limitations and handing off more is definitely doable.

 

We bounce around a lot with BW and what we're doing... but my kids are 13 and we finished Partnership ages ago. My kids have outgrown even a lot of the Arrow books and are mostly at the Boomerang level. I can't quite imagine still doing Quiver books with them. It's definitely to each their own - some older kids aren't ready, for sure. And the projects in PW are really age flexible. But on the other hand, you may be being more of a partner than is necessary at this stage. Most kids are into the Faltering Ownership stage and they're ready to do more independently. I'd maybe get FO and hand it off to him mostly on his own. Keep doing things like Poetry teas with both of them. Let him pick his own copywork from whatever books you assign. And then get him a grammar workbook to be the independent piece and just hand it off in that sense. We liked The Giggly Guide to Grammar (it has exercises throughout).

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my kids are 13 and we finished Partnership ages ago. My kids have outgrown even a lot of the Arrow books and are mostly at the Boomerang level. I can't quite imagine still doing Quiver books with them. It's definitely to each their own - some older kids aren't ready, for sure. And the projects in PW are really age flexible. But on the other hand, you may be being more of a partner than is necessary at this stage. Most kids are into the Faltering Ownership stage and they're ready to do more independently. I'd maybe get FO and hand it off to him mostly on his own.

He's been doing the PW projects, but after I introduce the project to everybody he writes his on his own. I need to look at it with an eye to whether he could read the directions himself, my impression was that they were very chatty, very directed at the teacher. Maybe that changes in FO? I do have FO, but haven't looked at it yet.

 

I'm combining four kids. 12/10/7/4. That's why we alternate. He still really enjoys Charlotte's Web and Mr poppers penguins even though he's reading treasure island and Sherlock Holmes on his own. He is not in any hurry to grow up, lol, so he doesn't look down at little kid books. But next year I was going to have him start doing Pouch books the months I do Quiver with the other kids.

 

Keep doing things like Poetry teas with both of them. Let him pick his own copywork from whatever books you assign. And then get him a grammar workbook to be the independent piece and just hand it off in that sense. We liked The Giggly Guide to Grammar (it has exercises throughout).

And not worry about the grammar and copywork in the arrow guides? He's going to be doing Fix It grammar, so that can just be his copywork and grammar. I would just need to work on the having big juicy conversations part... Edited by vaquitita
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Yes, if he's already doing Fix It, then he's fulfilling the bulk of the purpose of copywork in the Arrows. Not everything, but you can't do it all - especially with four kids in different stages.

 

FO isn't written more to the student, but I think that's okay - you sitting down to help him get started can be a ten minute conversation. It doesn't have to be tons of lesson time.

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