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Æthelthryth the Texan

Which Singapore math version?

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Sorry if there is a thread on this. I tried searching and nothing came up. 

 

I am trying to order a Singapore Math book for ds6. I'm on the website and I'm very confused over which version. The Scope and Sequence didn't help- just made it more confusing. I just want to give him a placement test and buy one book and text to see how it works. 

 

I've been using K Essentials with his little sister, but I'm clueless on the upper levels. Do I just get the Primary Math U.S. 3rd Edition, and not the CC or other version? Also, I want the Home Instructor's Guide, correct, not the Teacher's guide? 

 

I'm trying not to spend a lot. MM is on sale through HSBCO this month, and I want to do a trial and see which is the better fit for him because everyone keeps suggesting Singapore. But this is a great time to buy MM if we stick with that. I placed him too low and have been stalling until the March sale to buy something new.

 

What I've seen on the K Essentials, he'd still like MM better, but I think the grade school versions are different, right?

 

ETA: 

 

Also do I need the Textbook, the workbook, and the IG, or can I get buy with less? I Fwiw, I've taken Kate Snow's Teaching Elementary Mathematics course and have the Elementary Mathematics for Teachers books she recommended. 

Edited by texasmom33

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If you want cheap and easy Singapore Math, go with U.S. it covers slightly fewer topics than standards and is mostly black and white. It also has a decent HIG.

 

If you want more topics/acceleration, color, and a better HIG, go with standards.

 

I really do not see much, if any, value in the common core edition. It covers fewer topics than standards, more slowly than standards, and uses all kinds of silly new terms (like arrays). It also only has a costly teacher’s guide, no HIG.

 

There’s a new version of PM coming out this spring based on the CA standards version. Based on preliminary info, it includes more built-in review and drill but maintains the same scope/sequence. This may be end up being my favorite version of all even if I only get to use it for one year. It won’t have a HIG for a while but one is planned.

Edited by Sneezyone
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If you want cheap and easy Singapore Math, go with U.S. it covers slightly fewer topics than standards and is mostly black and white. It also has a decent HIG.

 

If you want more topics/acceleration, color, and a better HIG, go with standards.

 

I really do not see much, if any, value in the common core edition. It covers fewer topics than standards, more slowly than standards, and uses all kinds of silly new terms (like arrays). It also only has a costly teacher’s guide, no HIG.

 

There’s a new version of PM coming out this spring based on the CA standards version. Based on preliminary info, it includes more built-in review and drill but maintains the same scope/sequence. This may be end up being my favorite version of all even if I only get to use it for one year. It won’t have a HIG for a while but one is planned.

Good summary of why to go with one or the other.

 

We used US ed at first and then I heard about the HIG for standards being better and we switched starting with 3A. I very much appreciated the HIG for the method/concepts. It also had great Mental Math drills to photo copy from the back (part of Singapore method the teacher usually does on their own) and made grading faster when we were in level 5. When we went back to Singapore for another child starting in 1st US Edition was great because I already had the conceptual instruction down. So I guess my point is that the method presented in the HIG is important and Standards does the best job with this, especially beginning in level 3. Standards is the Edition I recommend to most people because of this fact.

 

Text, workbook, and HIG for each level is what you need. You could sub IP book for the workbook if you want more practice/challenge.

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My understanding was that they are all fairly similar, so you are probably okay with any version. The US edition is going to use US money in any word problems or money units, whereas that might not be the case with every edition.

 

We use the US edition with the textbook, workbook, and Home Instructor’s Guide. The HIG was definitely necessary for me to learn how to teach in the way that the curriculum is set up to be taught. It is very different from the way I was taught math growing up (my math education was pretty mediocre) which is why I need the Hig, but some people do fine without it.

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If you want cheap and easy Singapore Math, go with U.S. it covers slightly fewer topics than standards and is mostly black and white. It also has a decent HIG.

 

If you want more topics/acceleration, color, and a better HIG, go with standards.

 

I really do not see much, if any, value in the common core edition. It covers fewer topics than standards, more slowly than standards, and uses all kinds of silly new terms (like arrays). It also only has a costly teacher’s guide, no HIG.

 

There’s a new version of PM coming out this spring based on the CA standards version. Based on preliminary info, it includes more built-in review and drill but maintains the same scope/sequence. This may be end up being my favorite version of all even if I only get to use it for one year. It won’t have a HIG for a while but one is planned.

 

Okay, this is exactly what I want then. I'm doing it in hopes of making it easier to accelerate him because he picks everything up pretty fast. I feel like I'm tossing money out the window trying to catch up to him and am hoping Singapore runs at a better pace. I wish math programs weren't so darn expensive to try out! 

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Okay, this is exactly what I want then. I'm doing it in hopes of making it easier to accelerate him because he picks everything up pretty fast. I feel like I'm tossing money out the window trying to catch up to him and am hoping Singapore runs at a better pace. I wish math programs weren't so darn expensive to try out!

You won’t see a major difference in grades 1-3 but grades 4-6 include more algebra-specific content including negative numbers. Also, the U.S. edition stops at Gr.5 while Standards runs through Gr.6 (although there is no HIG for 6th grade). If you need to amp up the challenge, you can add the Intensive Practice books in place of the workbook or add the Challenging Word Problems book. I actually prefer the FAN math books for word problems tho. You can usually get by without the HIG through grade 3 but if you’re not comfy with SM problem solving/word problems, you will definitely want it after that.

Edited by Sneezyone
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You won’t see a major difference in grades 1-3 but grades 4-6 include more algebra-specific content including negative numbers. Also, the U.S. edition stops at Gr.5 while Standards runs through Gr.6 (although there is no HIG for 6th grade). If you need to amp up the challenge, you can add the Intensive Practice books in place of the workbook or add the Challenging Word Problems book. I actually prefer the FAN math books for word problems tho.

 

What are the FAN books? 

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What are the FAN books?

FAN Math/ Process Skills books teach how to solve word problems with bar models.

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FAN Math/ Process Skills books teach how to solve word problems with bar models.

 

I think he'll like these! I'm going to buy a couple and hold off on Singapore and work with what I have for the rest of this Spring. Thanks for the rec! 

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My understanding was that they are all fairly similar, so you are probably okay with any version. The US edition is going to use US money in any word problems or money units, whereas that might not be the case with every edition.

 

We use the US edition with the textbook, workbook, and Home Instructor’s Guide. The HIG was definitely necessary for me to learn how to teach in the way that the curriculum is set up to be taught. It is very different from the way I was taught math growing up (my math education was pretty mediocre) which is why I need the Hig, but some people do fine without it.

 

Just to clarify, both the US edition and the standards edition use US money.    :)   Both also teach both the metric and imperial units when measuring.

 

To the OP:

Both editions of Singapore math are wonderful, and there isn't *that* much of a difference IMHO.  :)    I've used both, and have personally preferred the standards edition.  

 

Here are some handy hints to help make your decision:

 

1)  Check out samples of the HIG for both editions for a couple of the grades.   This will probably be one of the biggest differences.

Example:

US HIG for 4A vs Standards HIG for 4A

 

2)  Check out the scope and sequence chart-   Pay attention to WHEN concepts are introduced for each version.   

As you can see, a few things are introduced earlier in the standards "S" version compared to the "U" version.  But, you can also see that both paths pretty much get you to the same place.   The only exception is toward the bottom of this chart.  Quite a few concepts are only taught in the "S" version.  I think you will tend to see this difference towards the later elementary grades.

 

3)  Will you supplement quite a bit with other Singapore books?   Both the extra practice (for kids struggling needing more practice) and the intensive practice (for advanced kids who need harder problems) are tied to the US version.   Of course, I have always used the standard version and paired it with the US extra practice books and things have been FINE.  :)  It just means I need to buy the books from a different section on the Rainbow Resource page.   

 

5)    How much built-in review?   The standard version contains a lot more cumulative review than the US version.   It has a cumulative review for each unit.   I found I had to add this myself when using the US version.   

---

 

To answer your other question, MOST kids will do just fine with the HIG + Textbook + Workbook combination.   All the other books can be added to personalize your program.  But I would try the regular combination first.   

 

You might need to add the extra practice books in if your kid needs more practice with a concept.  (Or, I tend to use the math mammoth topical workbooks for extra practice.  They are cheaper.  And I can download what I need immediatly and only IF I happen to need it.  There is nothing worse than paying for a workbook that sits unused on your shelf! )   

 

You might want to add in the challenging word problems or FAN books if you want more word problems.  (But the regular textbook and workbook contain plenty of wonderful word problems.)

 

You might want to administer tests.  (OR, you could use the cumulative reviews as "tests")

 

You might need to buy a mental math book if your child isn't getting the mental math concepts.

 

BUT--I would say that you won't know any of these things until you try the HIG + Textbook + Workbook combination first.   I use "just" the regular combination, and my kids have always tested very well in math.   I am not saying that as a brag.  My kids are NOT gifted mathematically;  I would describe them as regular kids.   (In fact, they even have quite a few LDs.)  It is just that so many concepts are introduced earlier in Singapore math compared to the standard US math track. So kids tend to test very well compared to other US students.   Plus, the word problems in singapore (even in their "regular" textbook/workbook) are more challenging than most math programs.  So they tend to think the word problems on standardized tests are ridiculously easy.  

 

Here is a standard day in our house:

 

1)  Teach the lesson to the child using the HIG as a guide.  (It is very scripted and even shows pictures of what you are supposed to do with the manipulatives as you teach the lesson.)

 

2)  Work some problems together from the textbook.   We might do all of the problems or just some if I feel like they are getting the concept.   We tend to do these on the white board.

 

3)  Send the child off to complete the workbook.   At the end of the day the child checks and corrects their work until they have 100% correct.   

 

(We also had to supplement math fact drill in the early ages.   And a few concepts required more practice than this.   For example, long division tends to be a tricky topic for most kids.)

Edited by TheAttachedMama

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