Jump to content

Menu

Walking at least 10,000 steps a day


Recommended Posts

 

 

Sit on the floor instead of your couch or chair at least once a day.

 

 

Create an alternate work station that allows you to stand up or sit on a pillow on the floor to write letters or pay bills. 

 

 

I appreciate all of your suggestions, but these two brought a smile to my face because they reminded me of my grandmother.  She loved to sit on the floor, and one of my fondest memories of her is how she would bring a pile of coloring books and a box of crayons and sit on the floor with my daughter, who was just a toddler at the time, and color with her for as long as my daughter wanted to.  She had other health problems, unfortunately, but she was quite limber for her age!  I think (outside of yoga or meditation classes) she's the only person I've ever known over the age of 10 who would routinely sit on the floor!  I'm going to try to emulate her more.  We have hard floors, no carpeting, in our house, and we don't even keep rugs because if one of our dogs has an accident, they inevitably go for the rug!  But I'm sure I can figure out something.  Anyway, I wanted to thank you!

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I see your point, and you could be absolutely right, but until they make one to go on my hips or legs it’s not going to reflect how much I move. During a typical drill I can be pumping my knees hard at least 350 times a minute, but isolating in such a way that everything above my rib cage is very still. These drills can last 10-20 minutes per class and that’s just the warm-up. Dancers are constantly moaning that they leave class tired and sweaty and the step count isn’t registering all of their effort. I’m guessing you could log more “steps†by knitting!

 

 

This is one of the main reasons I don't bother with a step counter. I do so much more than simply walk, and it would be annoying to try to work out steps and such. It's not the mental work I want to waste my time on.

 

I know that step counters are a useful tool for some people, though. It's not a life-long tool, though. At some point, one needs to grow, both physically and mentally, beyond walking and counting steps. Walking is a great way to sustain general health, but it's not a stand-alone exercise.

 

 

The OP mentioned a doctor talking about 10,000 steps/day of walking being better than other forms of exercise. I would debate this, unless there is a lot more information he mentions. 

Edited by wintermom
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

This is one of the main reasons I don't bother with a step counter. I do so much more than simply walk, and it would be annoying to try to work out steps and such. It's not the mental work I want to waste my time on.

 

I know that step counters are a useful tool for some people, though. It's not a life-long tool, though. At some point, one needs to grow, both physically and mentally, beyond walking and counting steps. Walking is a great way to sustain general health, but it's not a stand-alone exercise.

 

 

The OP mentioned a doctor talking about 10,000 steps/day of walking being better than other forms of exercise. I would debate this, unless there is a lot more information he mentions. 

 

My step counter also does (rough) heart rate.  I don't expect extreme accuracy but I do pay attention to the zones (cardio, peak, etc).  I agree that that is probably more important than sheer numbers of steps.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

If you walk 10,000 or more steps per day, could you tell me how you accomplish that? Do you set out on a deliberate walk just for the sake of walking? Do you incorporate more walking and less driving into your daily routine? Both? Other? About how many minutes of walking do you think it takes to get 10,000 steps?

 

(By the way, if there has already been a thread about this topic, could you please point me to it? I didn't find one, but that doesn't mean it isn't here.)

 

I was watching a doctor give a speech on YouTube yesterday and he said that people who are sedentary most of the day but do formal exercise, even intense exercise like CrossFit, are not as healthy as those who simply walk 10,000 or more steps per day. (He was not talking about strength or fitness or performance, just health and longevity). Unfortunately, if his power point cited his resources at the end, that didn't make it into the YouTube video, so I don't know what study (or studies) he was referencing. Are you familiar with any research that shows this?

 

I have a MisFit already, and it shows that I get as much as 5500 steps on a good day, and as few as 3000 on a bad day. So I've got a lot of room for improvement!

I just got a FitBit and my numbers are like yours. I have to be very intentional. Some evenings I do laps around the block in our neighborhood. Sometimes, in the middle of the morning I will do laps in the living room around the couch. I set my goal at 8,000 steps to start out and unless I extra steps, I don’t reach even 8,000. But it’s fun. I make a game out of it. And I try not to get discouraged.
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I just got a FitBit and my numbers are like yours. I have to be very intentional. Some evenings I do laps around the block in our neighborhood. Sometimes, in the middle of the morning I will do laps in the living room around the couch. I set my goal at 8,000 steps to start out and unless I extra steps, I don’t reach even 8,000. But it’s fun. I make a game out of it. And I try not to get discouraged.

 

Not getting discouraged is a big part of it! I think I quit the FitBit after comparing with my hubby every day. I was struggling to get to 10K and he was routinely reaching 24K. While comparisons can be useful for some, it can be discouraging for others.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Feeling like a major couch potato, lol.

 

On my busiest days, I'm lucky to break 5,000 without intentionally exercising.  On my not-so-busy days, forget about it.  But, when I drag my butt to the gym, I do things that don't register as steps, even though they're more vigorous than a brisk walk.

 

(My dog is no help.  I can't imagine his little body taking more than 1,000 steps/day. He does a few laps around the couch, lol.)

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

The OP mentioned a doctor talking about 10,000 steps/day of walking being better than other forms of exercise. I would debate this, unless there is a lot more information he mentions. 

 

 

Yes, the claim surprised me, so I wondered if anyone had any more information about it (or information to the contrary).  I think the overall point he was getting at is that formal exercise can only do so much to make up for being sedentary all day, and that we have to make a conscious effort to be active and moving throughout the day.  And I think that's a great point!  But I would still be surprised if someone who walks 10,000 steps but never gets their heart rate up into the aerobic zone is healthier than someone who sits more but does a few hours of cardio a week.  But if you're talking about someone who walks *briskly* and does get their heart rate up, then maybe the dynamic changes?  I don't know, but I would like to.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

There is no way that I can reach 10,000 steps in a day unless I specifically do a long walk and then mindfully work in steps for the rest of the day.  I LOVE being sedentary.  Seriously, I love to curl up on my couch and read or watch TV.  I also don't enjoy being outside at all.  So, in a normal day, I get about 3000 steps if I don't actively try for more.  When I am in a stage of wanting to get my 10,000 steps (I am trying to force myself to get motivated to do it regularly again now), I get up in the morning and walk on the treadmill for 45 minutes to an hour.  If I do that, I will get to 5,000 steps around 11:00 am or so.  This keeps me motivated to keep actively walking around my house for the rest of the day.  I sometimes have to walk around my house for a bit before bed to get the steps in, but I try to walk around earlier, so that I can spend the rest of the evening on the couch.  LOL!

 

The only time I can get to 10,000 steps without forcing exercise is when I am on vacation and actively touring someplace. Also, for the past 2 summers, I have spent 5 weeks in Seattle.  I find it very easy to get my 10,000 steps there just by walking around the city everyday.  I can see that I would naturally be able to do that if I lived in a big city where I didn't rely on a car.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

This article really doesn't tell us anything. 

 

It was an extremely small group. 

There was no mention of testing of impact on health impact ie I don't think it was actually a study. 

 

There are 2 different types of movement to be considering in terms of health: 

1) "Not sitting" movement

2)  Cardio exercise that elevates your heart rate

 

We need both. 

 

My understanding from reading the research is that "activity that breaks up sitting" is the most important kind. There is debate about whether someone who sits all day and then exercises compensates for the sitting time. Some studies refer to this as "active couch potatoes." 

 

To delve deeper into research, look for the effects of long periods of being sedentary. 

 

There actually is research that supports the 10000 steps to some degree. 

 

Cardio workouts are in a different category with an elevated heart rate. But the plain old motion of "steps" can be helpful. 

 

 

I use a fitness tracker to track my "background steps" ie how much I am moving in general throughout the day. I get about 6000 steps in by the time I'm done my part time job at a preschool and I used to get in 10000 steps when I was teaching. That is important movement because I am not sitting.  One way you can increase your steps is to misplace things. I can put in quite a few steps hunting frantically for something I need to get out the door!  But if you happen to be less absent-minded, that will probably not work for you. ;)

 

Other ways to get in more background steps: make a rule that you only talk on the phone while pacing, park further away from the door at the grocery store, etc, be deliberately inefficient in your movement. For instance, instead of a balancing act of gathering up things to put away, make more than one trip.  Use a tracker to look at your hourly movement. Break up the sitting by doing something active: sweeping, putting stuff away, walking down the hall to talk to a colleague, etc. 

 

When I deliberately walk or jog for exercise, I usually end up with upwards of 15000 steps for the day. But I don't really use the tracker for cardio. I *know* that I've been walking/jogging or swimming or whatever for 45-60 min. It doesn't slip by me, KWIM? OTOH, the "background steps" can get really low if I'm not paying attention to them and am not at work (for instance, on the weekends, I will tend to spend a lot of time on the computer.) 

 

I know I've saved some research links on this and maybe I will find some time to dig them up and pull them together later. But this should give you some areas to research. 

Edited by Laurie4b
  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

it's the concentrated exercise vs getting it throughout the day.

 

I found it most beneficial for me, when I would take the time to walk up and down my hill every hour or two.  took about five minutes at a time.   I got a nordic track skier into shape so I could do it not in the rain.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

T

Other ways to get in more background steps: make a rule that you only talk on the phone while pacing, 

 

My kids do this and it drives me crazy! As much as they sit with their electronics, they absolutely must be moving when they're talking to someone. I tell them to stop pacing (I get dizzy watching them walk around the island in the kitchen!); I guess I shouldn't be telling them to BE STILL!

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

This article really doesn't tell us anything.

 

It was an extremely small group.

There was no mention of testing of impact on health impact ie I don't think it was actually a study.

 

There are 2 different types of movement to be considering in terms of health:

1) "Not sitting" movement

2) Cardio exercise that elevates your heart rate

 

We need both.

 

My understanding from reading the research is that "activity that breaks up sitting" is the most important kind. There is debate about whether someone who sits all day and then exercises compensates for the sitting time. Some studies refer to this as "active couch potatoes."

 

To delve deeper into research, look for the effects of long periods of being sedentary.

 

There actually is research that supports the 10000 steps to some degree.

 

Cardio workouts are in a different category with an elevated heart rate. But the plain old motion of "steps" can be helpful.

 

 

I use a fitness tracker to track my "background steps" ie how much I am moving in general throughout the day. I get about 6000 steps in by the time I'm done my part time job at a preschool and I used to get in 10000 steps when I was teaching. That is important movement because I am not sitting. One way you can increase your steps is to misplace things. I can put in quite a few steps hunting frantically for something I need to get out the door! But if you happen to be less absent-minded, that will probably not work for you. ;)

 

Other ways to get in more background steps: make a rule that you only talk on the phone while pacing, park further away from the door at the grocery store, etc, be deliberately inefficient in your movement. For instance, instead of a balancing act of gathering up things to put away, make more than one trip. Use a tracker to look at your hourly movement. Break up the sitting by doing something active: sweeping, putting stuff away, walking down the hall to talk to a colleague, etc.

 

When I deliberately walk or jog for exercise, I usually end up with upwards of 15000 steps for the day. But I don't really use the tracker for cardio. I *know* that I've been walking/jogging or swimming or whatever for 45-60 min. It doesn't slip by me, KWIM? OTOH, the "background steps" can get really low if I'm not paying attention to them and am not at work (for instance, on the weekends, I will tend to spend a lot of time on the computer.)

 

I know I've saved some research links on this and maybe I will find some time to dig them up and pull them together later. But this should give you some areas to research.

Thank you, Laurie!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Laurie has the up to date information as always :)

 

Your list was cracking me up. I've always paced while I'm on the phone, quite often I clean. I used to talk to my mom every morning for 20-40 minutes, no telling how many steps I got in doing that.

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

This article is good because it links to the actual research about steps.http://time.com/4745061/how-many-steps-walking/   It answers the step question specifically. The conclusion (15000 steps is what we want to shoot for) is similar to what an exercise cardiologist (cinician and lead author of major research studies) told me during an apppointment. He said aim for 13000 steps.)  

 

This one is about the harm of sitting for long lengths of time without exercise breaks.https://qz.com/223160/why-not-even-exercise-will-undo-the-harm-of-sitting-all-day-and-what-you-can-do-about-it/   

 

https://www.runnersworld.com/health/sitting-is-the-new-smoking-even-for-runners  Interview with  author  (Hamilton) of several studies on the view that sitting plus exercise is much like smoking plus exercise: the exercise can't outdo the negative effects of either. 

 

 

 

 

https://www.cnn.com/2017/09/11/health/sitting-increases-risk-of-death-study/index.html  Author (Dias) of a new study linked in article suggests that just as we have specific guidelines for cardio (150 min per week moderate or 75 vigorous) that we need them for sitting as well. 

 

 

"We think a more specific guideline could read something like, 'For every 30 consecutive minutes of sitting, stand up and move/walk for five minutes at brisk pace to reduce the health risks from sitting,' " he said, adding the study "puts us a step closer to such guidelines," but more research is needed to verify the findings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Laurie4b
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Laurie has the up to date information as always :)

 

Your list was cracking me up. I've always paced while I'm on the phone, quite often I clean. I used to talk to my mom every morning for 20-40 minutes, no telling how many steps I got in doing that.

Yep, I talk to my mom every morning and can often get in 3000 that way. In good weather, I go out and walk up and down the dirt road in front of my house. In bad weather, I walk back and forth in the house (small house means lots of back and forth, lol). 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

This article is good because it links to the actual research about steps.http://time.com/4745061/how-many-steps-walking/   It answers the step question specifically. The conclusion (15000 steps is what we want to shoot for) is similar to what an exercise cardiologist (cinician and lead author of major research studies) told me during an apppointment. He said aim for 13000 steps.)  

 

This one is about the harm of sitting for long lengths of time without exercise breaks.https://qz.com/223160/why-not-even-exercise-will-undo-the-harm-of-sitting-all-day-and-what-you-can-do-about-it/   

 

https://www.runnersworld.com/health/sitting-is-the-new-smoking-even-for-runners  Interview with  author  (Hamilton) of several studies on the view that sitting plus exercise is much like smoking plus exercise: the exercise can't outdo the negative effects of either. 

 

 

 

 

https://www.cnn.com/2017/09/11/health/sitting-increases-risk-of-death-study/index.html  Author (Dias) of a new study linked in article suggests that just as we have specific guidelines for cardio (150 min per week moderate or 75 vigorous) that we need them for sitting as well. 

 

 

Laurie, this is fantastic.  Thank you so much for going to all that trouble for me (us)!  I am looking forward to reading all of these.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you guys think is the ideal location to wear a fitness tracker?  I currently have one on a wrist band, and since I usually forget to move it before I bike or use the stepmill (hands gripping the rail) it doesn't count all of that activity!  Before this, I had one on a magnetic clip that could be worn anywhere, and I really liked that.  But apparently the magnetic clip was not as secure as I assumed, because it fell off somewhere unknown to me and I lost it.  I think the obvious short-term solution is that I have to start remembering to move it when I'm doing an activity that moves my legs but not my arms.  OR, this particular model can also be used with a necklace or lariat instead of a wrist band, so maybe I should get one of those.  But in the long-term, is there a better one to purchase?

Link to post
Share on other sites

My fitbit has a place on the “dashboard “ where it measures specifically if I get 260 steps in that hour. The idea is to combat long stretches of sitting. So if I simply get 250 steps each hour during an 8 hour work day I get 2000 steps / which is obviously not enough. So I want to combine my 250 steps an hour goal with my larger minimum step goal to ensure that I am getting enough of both benefits. I hope that makes sense.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you guys think is the ideal location to wear a fitness tracker?  I currently have one on a wrist band, and since I usually forget to move it before I bike or use the stepmill (hands gripping the rail) it doesn't count all of that activity!  Before this, I had one on a magnetic clip that could be worn anywhere, and I really liked that.  But apparently the magnetic clip was not as secure as I assumed, because it fell off somewhere unknown to me and I lost it.  I think the obvious short-term solution is that I have to start remembering to move it when I'm doing an activity that moves my legs but not my arms.  OR, this particular model can also be used with a necklace or lariat instead of a wrist band, so maybe I should get one of those.  But in the long-term, is there a better one to purchase?

Before I got mine, I did tons of "research" and everything I read said that the ones you wear on your trunk are the most accurate. I have a fitbit one with a little rubber case that I clip onto the center of my bra. I have worn it clipped to the inside of my jeans pocket or waistband before, but I like the bra best because I can just leave it there even if I change clothes. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I get up and let the dog in and out myself, instead of yelling at the kids to do it :)

 

I go shopping at Walmart or Target or the Grocery Store and park far in the back of the parking lot, then wander the store for a while. I'm in Florida, so walking in air conditioning is nice. DO take the tracker off your wrist if it is a wrist type, while pushing a cart or you tend not to get all your steps. I put it in a pocket. 

 

Those are my big tips, lol. If I go to Walmart I always get my steps in...I criss cross the store several times and the parking lot is huge. 

 

Oh, or if I'm hanging up clothes I walk each shirt to the closet separately instead of hanging them all up and carrying them all at once. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I don’t know how to quote on my phone.

 

I have the Zip like VaKim. I usually wear it on my waistband or sometimes on my bra. It seems to count most things accurately except cycling. I know someone who bikes a lot and puts it on their shoe if they are biking.

 

Also, for people that want to count activities that their tracker might miss...you can go on the app or site and enter the activity you did manually. Some will convert to steps. I only do that if I forget to wear it and want the credit.

 

I look at the Fitbit similar to the person who said it gives an idea of background movement. And I aim to more increase my activity rather than worry too much about a specific magica number.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Laurie, this is fantastic.  Thank you so much for going to all that trouble for me (us)!  I am looking forward to reading all of these.

 

You're welcome. When I was losing the 60 pounds and since, one of the main ways I keep my head in the game is by keeping up with the literature on fitness, nutrition, etc. It's been so helpful to me that I enjoy sharing it so maybe others will be helped as well. In fact, I was interested to see on the National Weight Loss Registry that many others have switched careers into a health career. I got certified as a health coach last year through a local university. I feel so much better, stronger, etc. and just want to pass that on. So if I can find it in my files, I'm happy to post it. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as those people who are skeptical about the benefit of a fitness tracker, it's just a tool.  What's really important is getting up off of your duff, moving and having an active lifestyle. If you don't need it, then it really isn't a big deal.   I happen to benefit - a lot - from having a fitness tracker.  It gives me a measurable goal to work for.  And it gives me a measurable number to give to my doctor.  If I didn't have a fitness tracker, there is a good chance that I would be in a wheelchair by now.  In fact, I may still end up there but I'm working my butt off trying to keep that from happening.  If I sit for more than a certain amount of time (an hour?), I am literally tottering for a minute or two.  My muscles seize up.  My doctor says that is also something to do with my hips.  They are really unstable. 

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

I do have to share a funny that happened to dd, the helo pilot. She's had several trackers over the last few years, but finally figured out what was going on with one of them. It was counting taking off in her helo as climbing stairs! Needless to say, she was getting many 1000's of steps a day. 

 

And now I need to go get the mail, thus getting my 250+ steps for this hour... 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm horrible. On days we stay home and just have a full school day, I sometimes only get between 2 and 3k steps. I feel like I tend to sit a lot when we're doing school. I sit with them to do LA and math, I sit on the couch to do read alouds, I sit on the couch with DD5 during quiet reading time... I typically sit at the table on my computer during breakfast and lunch to hit here or fb while I eat. 

 

I tend to stay sitting past whatever I needed to sit for. Especially in the winter I just have a desire to curl up under a blanket and not move. I have a hard time pushing past that when there is nothing that absolutely must be done right that moment. 

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm horrible. On days we stay home and just have a full school day, I sometimes only get between 2 and 3k steps. I feel like I tend to sit a lot when we're doing school. I sit with them to do LA and math, I sit on the couch to do read alouds, I sit on the couch with DD5 during quiet reading time... I typically sit at the table on my computer during breakfast and lunch to hit here or fb while I eat. 

 

I tend to stay sitting past whatever I needed to sit for. Especially in the winter I just have a desire to curl up under a blanket and not move. I have a hard time pushing past that when there is nothing that absolutely must be done right that moment. 

I did a lot of reading under a blanky on the couch yesterday and got a total of 842 steps for the day.  :thumbdown:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...