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bttrflyvld

Science that is....

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We've loved RSO science. We've used 3 of there books. However, the samples of pbysics looks dry. I could be wrong. (Anyone tried it?) So my searches is on.

 

This would be for 3rd and 5th grade.

 

Looking for (if it exists):

 

-low prep. (I'm tired of digging up supplies)

 

-Comes with all supplies (except perishables and kitchen tools)

 

-easy to get done

 

-Not dry or boring textbook like.

 

-manageable amount of experiments (that work) or could be done independent with supplies set out.

 

-dare I say fun?

 

-maybe lessons on the computer?

 

I feel burnt out right now and don't feel a lot of enthusiasms for science. Which should be one of the funnest hands on parts of school. my daughters really love science and ask for more hands on experiments. I think i need to try something new to renew my passion to teach it.

 

 

Ideas?

Edited by bttrflyvld
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Hmm....

 

I would go with:

Mystery Science - on the computer, not dry or textbook-like, the only supplies needed are household items and a printer if you do the labs.

 

Moving Beyond The Page Science - living books, has a kit for each level, and heavy on learning through doing.

 

Ellen J McHenry units - engaging and well done, but you have to get a few to make it work for the year.

 

 

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Hmm....

 

I would go with:

 

Mystery Science - on the computer, not dry or textbook-like, the only supplies needed are household items and a printer if you do the labs.

 

Moving Beyond The Page Science - living books, has a kit for each level, and heavy on learning through doing.

 

Ellen J McHenry units - engaging and well done, but you have to get a few to make it work for the year.

Thanks. I'm going too go look them ☠up.

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I like berean builders science. Rainbow resource sells a kit too. Its interesting, has an easy experiment each lesson and is for all k-6.

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Super Charged is pretty darn awesome. You can either get a dvd that covers 1 topic or subscribe to the e-science program. It can be really hands off. Just choose what experiment or topic you want to do and get the stuff together. Turn on the video and put the stuff out on the table. We did a free month trial and my kids fell in love with it. I stayed away for a long time because her marketing felt pushy and annoying. However, it really is so awesome. My kids got to do a ton of experiments that worked and were incredibly neat :)

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Home Science Tools sells kits for many curriculums.

 

Have you looked at NOEO? Nancy Larsen?

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Byte Size Physics does not come with all the supplies, but they are all common household items, so it's not as hard to find them as some places, and it is very hands on, and I found the reading not to be dry.  I used it with a 2nd grader and 6th grader and they both liked it a lot (briefly...I didn't finish it because I mainly got it for my 6th grader, and he went back to school for other reasons).   We did not use the videos (which did seem a little dry). 

 

http://bitesizephysics.com/

 

We combined it with some physics experiments in Experimenting With the Vikings (which were very fun...but again, you had to find supplies).  I just skipped anything in that which had supplies which were too hard to find.   It's a free curriculum.  

 

http://www.rsc.org/learn-chemistry/resource/res00001940/experiment-with-the-vikings?cmpid=CMP00006331#!

 

Edited by goldenecho
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Byte Size Physics does not come with all the supplies, but they are all common household items, so it's not as hard to find them as some places, and it is very hands on, and I found the reading not to be dry. I used it with a 2nd grader and 6th grader and they both liked it a lot (briefly...I didn't finish it because I mainly got it for my 6th grader, and he went back to school for other reasons). We did not use the videos (which did seem a little dry).

 

http://bitesizephysics.com/

 

We combined it with some physics experiments in Experimenting With the Vikings (which were very fun...but again, you had to find supplies). I just skipped anything in that which had supplies which were too hard to find. It's a free curriculum.

 

http://www.rsc.org/learn-chemistry/resource/res00001940/experiment-with-the-vikings?cmpid=CMP00006331#!

Thank you. I haven't heard of either of these before. I'll take a look.

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