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Paradox5

Teaching Lang Arts Skills

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I have been going bonkers trying to think of and research writing skills options for Son 3. Then it hit me: why don't I just use what I did with Son 1, the Writing Skills series by Diana Hanbury? Back then, we had done enough R&S and other things for grammar that I didn't feel I needed to add to what was in the books for grammar. Son 3 is another issue. Should I consider supplementing? I have FLL 3 on the shelf.

 

Also, I like the looks of The Paragraph series, too. If I wanted to combine the two programs, does anyone have a suggestion for how to do that? Maybe cover WS Book A then Paragraph Book 1?? I was sort of thinking the WS gives the instruction and the Paragraph books can give some practice.

 

Thoughts?

 

I was planning to pair this/these with MegaWords for spelling and vocabulary. I am still at a loss for a literature component. He will read a chapter a day of a book for me IF it is in his planner. He will not discuss. Ideas?

 

Thanks!

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How old is he? Does he have learning disabilities?

 

I used Writing Skills, but not the Paragraph Book, so I can't suggest how to combine them. We did like Writing Skills, but I did tweak it. As I recall, it guides the student to write down sentences or ideas about their topic and then turn it into paragraphs. But there was nothing about revision. Revision is such a big part of the writing process, and so I added that in. Also, my kids needed some extra guidance to form their paragraphs, so I would create a makeshift graphic organizer for them. So it wasn't perfect as is for us, but it gave us a structure to follow, and it seemed to help (my kids have some LDs). 

 

If you are willing to use a Christian curriculum and don't mind reading instruction being from a text instead of a chapter book, I recommend CLE Reading. It really has a lot of support built in that can help those who struggle but is more than just reading comprehension. You can look at the scope and sequence at www.clp.org to see all that it covers. The stories are from a Mennonite perspective and are not high literature, but the program does a thorough job teaching HOW to read and understand a text. I would also have my children do free reading each day from a chapter book, but they did not have to discuss those with me. If your son does not like to discuss what he reads, this might be a good combo for you. He would know that the CLE reading portion of school time would include reading and working with you (there is a workbook), but he would then not have to talk about his other reading.

 

If you don't want to use something like CLE, you could have him read whatever you choose and then have him write a short summary of what he read. In this case, I think you really need to read the book yourself also, so you know if his summaries are showing that he understands what he read.

 

In either case, if you have a child with learning disabilities, I think it's important for you to have a way to check on comprehension. DS13 has comprehension difficulties, and if I just let him read a chapter a day without discussing it, he would let the words slide by without thinking about the story, just to get through it and say he was done. This may not be the case with your son, but I thought I'd mention it.

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If you choose CLE Reading, be aware that grades one and two are a learn to read program and are different. Grade three and up are as I described in my post. The fifth grade level increases in difficulty, so I might start a middle school student there, instead of expecting them to jump in at grade level. And I might start a fifth grade student with level 4. Each level builds on skills taught previously. An older student does not need to start at grade 3, but may not want to start at grade level, unless they already have a strong background in working through a reading program.

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Also, I am very bookish person and thought that I would teach my kids about reading and literature just by reading and talking about books with them. That approach does work for some students. But not for mine. I had to adapt to their needs, and using a systematic approach was better for them.

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I have used CLE in the past. We all hated it. I have found secular or classic stories work best. BUT I do not like Mosdos or LL for this kid.

 

He is almost 14 (2 months to go), reads excellently, no comprehension problems. I think it is just getting him to actually do it.

 

Thank you for the form idea. I have one I made a few years ago that I will reprint.

 

 

 

Edited by Paradox5

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My ds is like that, not reading even though in theory he can, so I try to fit in sneaky reading. Like I got a non-fiction reading comprehension social studies series from Teacher Created Resources. They also have grade leveled books of it for science. It's very brief, just enough. I also make sure he reads math, and I use grade leveled Daily Word Problem ebooks for that. 

 

We use comics for waiting, so again that can get us 5-10 minutes here or there. You could bring in a poetry study, boom more reading. 

 

I have some of the Diana King books on writing and they're fine. I also really like the books I find on TCR, Evan Moor, Carson Dellosa, etc. Just kind of roll with your gut.

Edited by PeterPan

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