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heartlikealion

Do you do VT exercises at home?

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If so, for how long? How many times a day?

 

We're supposed to be doing daily exercises (crab crawl, bear walk, snow angels and possibly other stuff). I usually try to get the kids to put their glasses on and briefly do their exercises, but I'm wondering if I'm being a slacker about this. I just feel good when we get them done at all. I got some wood from Home Depot and asked dh to screw it together for a balance board but we don't have it set up yet.

 

I tried doing a zoom ball with ds figuring that would be good for him, but it freaked him out when it zoomed toward him. Said it hurt his hands. I said don't let the ball get so close and if it does the handles should take the impact. But it didn't go over well. He literally threw the handle down lol.

 

We're supposed to do exercises daily and return in a few months to see if there's been improvement. At least, for dd who has to wear her glasses all the time. But both kids were encouraged to do the exercises. They may have retained reflexes based on the wording the dr used in a letter. I'm still not super sure how to evaluate all that or address it. I tried an online test for one once, but it didn't seem applicable.

 

So anyway, do you do exercises at home and how long? Maybe I should be making the kids do these twice a day. Ugh, I barely get it done once a day.

 

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Homework was essential for us--about 10-15 minutes per day, about 5 times per week.

 

We had weekly therapy with homework that changed over time.

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I personally found It easier to put on.music and have my son do it like a morning exercise program. I tried to make them dun ans developmental. I probably wasn't as effective as the pyramid of potential people where they target everything in a very slow pueposeful pattern but overtime we mastered superman's ,snowangels,bearcrawls, lion pushups, we did balance board stuff where I threw stuff back and forth. I think I got most of it and he made good improvements in vision therapy.

 

For actual vision therapy at home.

 

There is a game called "wok and roll" that I think really helps with vision tweezers and fine motor. I also put a sticker on the window and had him focus close and then look at the neighbors tree several times to build his focusing skills. I had him color in the a and o.in a magazinr. I also did a lot of fine motor and whiteboard drawing to strengthen his arm ans shoulder muscles because he had horrible handwriting issues. Paddle ball games, ping pong badminton whatever you can think of to keep that hand eye going. Marbles, pixie sticks even jenga, operation. We played a lot of games that required fine motor and vision.

 

Beyond the traditional retained reflex exercises we branched out to functional stuff.

 

He loves wall ball and I think that,swingset and monkey bars helped a lot. Soccer,swimming anything that focuses and crossed the midline.

 

It's hard for it not to become tedious I still feel like I could have done more. My son loves the balance board stuff. He eventually got into skateboards and scooters which are good too. We did basketball and any kind of functional fitness that I felt could help develop the motions he should have had as an infant.

 

I love those yoga balls. We used them a lot. We loved starfish and bridges on the ball and superman. Really I just tried to get him to work the trunk muscles he would have as an infant.

 

 

How I kept on going was by getting stickers and putting a sticker in the calendar everyday we got it done. I tried to make it as fun as possible.

 

It was tough to keep it up so don't beat yourself up just do what you can it will be enough.

 

We now are trying to do balavisx.

 

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk

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Both my sons have done things daily at school with OT. I haven’t done it at home. Only my older son has really done retained reflexes, I think. He was older (5th grade or so) and so he could do it independently. This means, the OT made a card for him with the exercises and taught him how to do them. Then the resource room had a mat in it and the teacher there could hand him his card and tell him to do his exercises, and just keep an eye on him to make sure he did it properly.

 

My younger son is in a higher-needs program and they do a lot of OT stuff throughout the day. I don’t think he has done anything specifically for retained reflexes though. He did do this figure 8 tracing and tracking thing though. I am a little vague but they did have a figure 8 up on the wall in that room and I have seen them have kids trace it or track it just when they had a little extra time.

 

I think if you have any way to really build it into your daily routine, tied to other parts of your daily routine, it is easier. If you can leave any materials out or very easily accessible that makes it easier.

 

Your daughter probably needs you 100% involved to do whatever you are doing correctly. For your son, maybe he can do some more independently. He might not be able to if he slips into doing things incorrectly, but then if some things he can do correctly and just needs to do them — if you work up to it you might be able to get him to do them more independently so he could do his exercises while you are with your daughter. It can be a lot easier and make it a lot more practical if you can have one child just need a little guidance and “we’re in the same room†kind of supervision, while another child really needs about 100% attention.

 

But if the exercises are hard or frustrating, or if he is prone to do them incorrectly without a lot of feedback, then it’s probably not the right time.

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With my older son, he has had times with OT where they made changes every 2-3 weeks (and probably less), and he has had times where he did stay on the same exercises for months.

 

It is two different situations in a lot of ways. When he had more frequent changes, he really did need more time with the OT because he basically couldn’t do things correctly and so without a ton of 1:1 he would do things wrong, and it’s the kind of thing I am bad at and I won’t notice if he slips into the wrong way of doing things.

 

Then when he had the same exercises for months, he could do them pretty well, at least he could do them correctly for a small amount of time. It would be the kind of thing where he needed to build up to a longer time or he would just need to do the practice over time. That kind of thing takes a lot less direct guidance and it’s also easier for the exercises to be done, because they can be more like “okay it’s time to do your OT exercises†and it’s not a big deal.

 

But I have never prioritized this stuff at home. At the time my older son was doing this, we had major issues with my younger son.

 

It is very hard to qualify for OT at a lot of schools, though. My older son qualified off and on through elementary school. He qualified for two years, didn’t qualify for a year or two, then qualified again for another two years. It’s unusual enough people would be very surprised that he could qualify and receive services at school.

 

My younger son is in a special program and it’s taken for granted that all the kids will qualify for OT and have OT needs.

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The physical movement exercises they gave you are for retained reflexes, and you need to do them *every single day* without fail for at least 45 days. If you do not do that, you're still going to have retained reflexes a few months from now. The ball, the balance board, this other stuff is gravy. If you can only get some of it done, do the exercises for the retained reflexes.

 

It sounds like the doc overwhelmed you and gave you a big list without enough explanations and enough accountability. The vision part will work better once the reflexes are integrated, and the reflexes will not get integrated by being haphazard. So if you're feeling overwhelmed, focus on the reflex exercises only.

 

If you focus on the reflex exercises and do them MORE, like 2-3 times a day, you'll make faster progress. That's how I finally got progress with my ds, when I started doing the exercises 3-4 times a day. It was a huge pain in the butt, but it was a very brief pain in the butt. For real, if you will do them, without fail, every single day for 45 days, you'll probably make noticeable progress. If you do them haphazardly, it won't work. It's going to be the amount of effort you put in. 

 

Focus on the reflexes. Like do that list 3-4 times a day and do the stuff for vision just once a day. That will be more manageable. Print 2 copies of a 30 day calendar and put a sticker on it every time you do the exercises for the day. When you hit 30 or 45 days, have a party or order pizza or something. It's ok to need to reward yourself (and them). :)

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I think that’s true for some kids but hardly for every kid. Some kids aren’t able to do the exercises smoothly when they are younger, for one thing. My older son was just jerky and he had a very hard time coordinating his limbs when he was younger. He couldn’t have done the same exercises properly when he was younger, that he was able to do better when he was older.

 

My younger son just has an easier time with things like this. It is unexpected because overall my older son has a much easier time.

Edited by Lecka

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Hmm I hadn't thought of that -- that these ex. were for retained reflexes. We actually did start a sticker chart like last week?

 

The dr has me keep eye contact when they do certain things and now I'm second guessing if they do that during the crab crawls & bear walks. I don't know. She said use the white board more for ds since he's near sighted. I need to start doing that again. Dd messes with it so it's frustrating.

 

Another thing I'm supposed to do is have her make eye contact with me and try to pull her self up on me but I'm terrible at that one. The doctor did this thing and I spinning chair with her at the office and I tried to do it at the park with a spinning chair there but dd refused because she didn't want to play on it I guess. I should take her to dh's work for the spin chair. He works down the street.

 

Yeah you could say I feel a little overwhelmed but maybe I should make this two times a day thing or three to make better progress. Dd struggles with crab crawls and her butt drags on the floor a little but she has improved.

 

I supervise the exercises. I wish dh was more involved. I kinda feel like it's my burden.

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Just curious — if the purpose of the eye contact is to keep their head up or focus on something, could you put a picture or sticker on the wall for them to look at? It could make it a lot easier possibly, for you to get done, but I don’t know if it would mess up the purpose of doing it.

 

I do have a strong opinion, sometimes those things that are very hard to get kids to do are actually really hard for the kids to do. I think sometimes there could be something easier to do instead. Other times I think doing a little bit can take a kid to exhaustion and burnout, so the amount you do might seem very small compared to what you hear of other kids doing, but it could still be really good for your child.

 

When things are easier for kids it’s a lot easier to make them into a game in some way. If that is possible it goes a long way.

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My post above implied that I did all that stuff at once. Sorry it was a bit rambling that progression happened over almost a 2 year period but I did spend the 60 days working everyday to do a small exercise routine of the main retained reflex exercises. I like the pyramid of potential video to explain how to do them properly. But I varied rhe crawling exercises like I put up tape for him to belly crawl under and another day I had them pick up pennies crawling around the loop. It was very frustrating at first because my son could not do a superman to save his life but overtime we got it. Just start with the most important ones and do your best to get it in.

 

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk

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Just curious — if the purpose of the eye contact is to keep their head up or focus on something, could you put a picture or sticker on the wall for them to look at? It could make it a lot easier possibly, for you to get done, but I don’t know if it would mess up the purpose of doing it.

 

I agree that the sticker probably could do this job depending on the exercise. I think it is so that they will keep their head in the right position and also a bit for focus. My kids were supposed to always know what to look at during each exercise, and we never had to do eye contact.

 

Did the office give you specifics on how many times to do each exercise? It's probably better to do just a couple and do them well than to do all of them if they are too difficult. Then you can add in more over time. Multiple times of days is probably fine (and good), but it's not always necessary. 

 

My son did just a couple of crawls each day, for example. But as he got good at them, they gave him different crawls. Then he might have one "old" crawl that they had him do to the beat of a metronome, while he was learning a new crawl. Then, maybe they would have other distractors for the old one. It was a gradual progression. I was supposed to watch for things like doing it too fast (it's easier to be fast), having head and hands in the right place, etc. They made sure I was confident about what to look for, and I asked questions. But it made sense to me vs. say, speech therapy, where I couldn't hear or see tiny differences.

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I might need to double check with the dr. So far we're only doing them a few min. :o -- the dr. had them do the walks in her office by walking around the hallway. At home I just make them go from end of dining room toward me in living room making eye contact. I told ds he doesn't have to make eye contact with me if he finds something else to focus on. But with dd I say, "Look at me, look at me." She's the one that has esotropia. We're trying to make her eyes work together and strengthen her weaker side. The dr says her left side is weaker (that's the eye that does more turning, though both have done it).

 

Do/did your children have an eye turn?

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No. I have one with autism who has/had all kinds of generic visual processing issues that can be common with autism.

 

For my older son, he would score very low on coordination. Trouble crossing the midline. Trouble with visual tracking. Things like that.

 

I have been told with my older son, he has issues they usually see with kids who have a special needs placement and autism.

 

With my younger son, I have been told he has some of the least OT-related issues of anyone they have ever worked with who has his special needs placement and autism.

 

So I have one doing strangely bad and one doing strangely good ;) But no physical issues.

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Ahh interesting.

 

I think in our case it could be the dr chose our exercises to address both retained reflexes and equal body movement (moving left and right working together to walk, or make a snow angel so left side has to work as well. I couldn't really notice anything drastic, but dr claims dd would rely on stronger side of body). I just didn't know they were necessarily associated with RRs.

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It is kind of one big ball of wax--midline issues can be a problem because RR are there. It's like one depends on the other. But RR would be the foundation with the midline issues on top of them. Some kids have a variety of related things show up across different areas of functioning--there are some people who feel that even things like auditory processing issues can be caused by or exacerbated by things like RR. 

 

One of my kids had an eye that turned in, but it was subtle and only when his eyes needed to converge (move closer together) to do something up close or to track objects coming at him, like a ball to catch. Actually, I think when he was trying to track something fast moving like a ball, his brain actually ignored input from that eye because we never saw it while playing ball. We would see it move out (after initially moving in like it was supposed to) if we held a pencil out and slowly moved it toward his nose. 

 

Anyway, he didn't have as much reflex trouble as my other kiddo, so he didn't do the crawls. He did eye tracking with a Brock string. Your doctor might be using the eye contact with your DD as a way of getting her visual attention fixed so that it's easier to get her to do something like a Brock string (or other exercises) down the road.

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Oh, and on the one side weaker thing--I can see what your doctor is saying happening. Another possibility--with my son, he would have one side of the body working well and one not so much. However, if you had him concentrate on a certain movement, for instance, on moving his arms while swimming, the "bad" arm would get better, and the "good" arm would do what the "bad" arm had previously been doing! I imagine it could be a severe discrepancy though, and in a case like that, one side of the body could literally be more developed than the other.

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Snow angels are for retained reflexes. 

 

The doc might be chosing exercises as two-fers (multiple good effects), but a number of the things you listed are specifically for retained reflexes. As Kbutton said, they're really foundational, so getting them integrated will make everything go better.

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We're doing weekly VT and daily homework. I just treat the homework like it's a homeschool subject and work it into our daily timetable.

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Thanks. There's so much to learn. Also, dd lacks 3D vision. Not sure if exercises affect that but definitely can see us using strings and stuff for that (maybe this is the Brock string. I'll look it up). I haven't had a chance to read Fixing my Gaze yet.

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We're doing weekly VT and daily homework. I just treat the homework like it's a homeschool subject and work it into our daily timetable.

Yes! I actually pulled out my planner earlier tonight and added VT as a subject.

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Thanks. There's so much to learn. Also, dd lacks 3D vision. Not sure if exercises affect that but definitely can see us using strings and stuff for that (maybe this is the Brock string. I'll look it up). I haven't had a chance to read Fixing my Gaze yet.

 

VT should help that. 

 

It sounds like you are in for the full course of VT, whatever that looks like with your doc. My kids were lucky and got off with just about the shortest courses of VT ours had ever done. 

 

You will be SO GLAD you stuck it out. 

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VT should help that. 

 

It sounds like you are in for the full course of VT, whatever that looks like with your doc. My kids were lucky and got off with just about the shortest courses of VT ours had ever done. 

 

You will be SO GLAD you stuck it out. 

 

She has another office that is specifically for VT, but we sought her out at her closer office. She has a balance board and a few things at the nearby office. She didn't tell us anything about strings, but I did see the TED talk by Susan Barry after she gave me the name.

 

In another thread I talked about how I tried to get the kids OT through the school district, as the optometrist recommended it. But, I didn't want to pay/drive for the private options. Has anyone had any luck with that by getting a referral through an optometrist? Or did you have to get the ped. on board? Or ... ?? I was pretty much told they had to have something more significant to get services through the school. I'm not sure if I missed a loophole.

 

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School-based OT and PT is almost always for really basic stuff like being able to sit in the chair and hold a pencil. Now, once they are eligible, they might actually work on some other stuff too, but if they are not eligible, they get nothing. My older one was not eligible at all even though he needed it. My younger one has had borderline skills for years and only recently became eligible after peers pulled ahead so that the statistics are now in his favor. He's 10!

 

You might even want to go the PT route if there are reflex issues. Then, you might need a referral for insurance purposes or because the PT practice screens clients by requiring a referral. Your optometrist referral might be fine to get you in the door though.

 

It sounds like it would be really worth it for you to find a PT and drive. Seriously. Then follow up with OT. But with reflex issues, I would start with PT and go from there. Or find a practice that does both in house and let them duke it out by developing a comprehensive treatment plan. 

 

We are fortunate to stumble into some good options. We met a PT that might work for my younger son this weekend at a health fair of all things. He has some issues that make him a complicated patient. OT will be through the place where he has speech (which in his case is also a motor issue). 

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I checked my calendar and dd has a checkup with the optometrist on Monday. I will ask some questions pertaining to both of the kids then. There are limited options for PT and OT I think. Or at least, the one that seems to always come up is one I've been to before. We left kinda confused to be honest. That was when dd had torticollis and saw a PT. We paid a lot for that visit and just took home notes because insurance didn't cover it and we didn't want to drive 45 min. to go to 30 min. follow up sessions (we hadn't reached out deductible but that may or may not have been the only issue). The optometrist mentioned that place and I internally grimaced. Another homeschool mom said she's had much better experience with another place so I know if we do go somewhere I have a place in mind. She said they were better with insurance (we may not have the same plan, but we have the same ins.) and she felt the workers were more skilled or something? That location is also 45 min. from our house and tends to do 30 min. sessions. So you see, the gas money has to be added on top of the cost of the visits. Then it sounds outrageous and dh is just not going to want me to pursue it. I honestly don't know how badly the kids need PT or OT, but I do feel like they could benefit from something, even if it's just me forcing us to do more things at home.

 

What type of things made you say, "hmm, my kid needs OT or PT"? Or "My kid has reflex issues" ??

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I knew my kid needed OT when he was younger because he wasn't crossing his midline. I just googled and found a heap of exercises for it and we worked on it through games. ETA: I called us done when his bilateral coordination was such that he could push himself on a swing and ride a bicycle without assistance.

 

I also learned about strengthening his core and upper body to assist with handwriting, so we did a lot of upright painting and drawing (I stuck big sheets of paper to the walls and left a little tub of pencils and crayon rocks nearby), played with a trapeze, did wheelbarrow walks.

 

I found out about reflexes because Rosie_0801 told me how to check for a palmar reflex and then the VT and a chiropractor tested DS for more of them.

Edited by Pegs

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I didn’t with my older son until he had a school eval. I had kind-of known because the speech therapist had brought it up to me but I didn’t realize.

 

Things I could have noticed if I had realized..... going up and down stairs without crossing his legs. He would start with one foot and then bring the next foot down to the same step, instead of crossing down to the next lower step. He substituted with galloping when any activity called for crossing his legs. So he would lead with one foot and bring the other foot next to that foot, but not cross them. He ran a bit jerky and he would tend to have his left hand move with his left foot instead of having his left hand coordinate with his right foot. He had a very, very hard time with doing hand motions in music class, he would be a nervous wreck before concerts and look stressed and behind the beat while other kids looked happy. Lack of interest in swimming. Lack of interest in coloring. Very very poor handwriting. Eye tracking issues with reading.

 

With my younger son who has autism, when he was younger he would get dizzy with too much visual stimulation. A movie theater waiting area was like this, it had lights in the arcade area that would make him dizzy. He used to have a sensitivity to bright light. He used to have some visual stimming where he would stare at things that were interesting to him and not be able to attend.

 

Edit: it was hard to understand with my older son because he was good at legos, so it was hard to think he could have problems in this area when he was good at legos. That was a big hang-up on my side. Also had done so much speech therapy at that point I didn’t want there to be something else. I thought he would be done!

Edited by Lecka
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I have a question/comment about retained reflexes.

 

I have an impression like exercises *have* to be done in a smooth, controlled manner to be effective. If kids are jerky or can’t slow down, my understanding is it’s not going to do much for them.

 

So I hear about things that are for kids who can’t do some exercises because they can’t do them smooth and controlled (no matter with what modification or small amount of time).

 

So them what I have heard is they look for things the child can do or look for things that can be cooperative so that someone else is regulating the speed. With some someone else is coordinating the body movements also.

 

And then kind-of work up to being able to do the more advanced exercises, but maybe it takes years.

 

Most of it I hear in context of autism or I have heard it wrt my older son, but what I would hear with my older son matched what I would hear from autism contexts.

 

And mainly just — if he’s not able to do some things then we can’t just do it because we think he needs to do it. He has to work up to being able to do it.

 

Like — there are special needs modifications for a bal-a-vis-x and he did the special needs modifications, but it was always presented to me like you can’t rush him through special needs modifications to the regular program, he might just do special needs modifications.

 

And then later when he did do the starfish exercise for retained reflexes, that was presented to me like “he is able to do it now†and not at all like he could/should have done it 4-5 years earlier.

 

I don’t know anyone in person whose child has moved through so fast (as it comes across to me) but I have only ever known anyone in person doing it whose child was qualifying for OT at school, so it is kids who are delayed enough to qualify for school OT, which is hard to do.

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I have a question/comment about retained reflexes.

 

I have an impression like exercises *have* to be done in a smooth, controlled manner to be effective. If kids are jerky or can’t slow down, my understanding is it’s not going to do much for them.

 

So I hear about things that are for kids who can’t do some exercises because they can’t do them smooth and controlled (no matter with what modification or small amount of time).

 

So them what I have heard is they look for things the child can do or look for things that can be cooperative so that someone else is regulating the speed. With some someone else is coordinating the body movements also.

 

And then kind-of work up to being able to do the more advanced exercises, but maybe it takes years.

 

Most of it I hear in context of autism or I have heard it wrt my older son, but what I would hear with my older son matched what I would hear from autism contexts.

 

And mainly just — if he’s not able to do some things then we can’t just do it because we think he needs to do it. He has to work up to being able to do it.

 

Like — there are special needs modifications for a bal-a-vis-x and he did the special needs modifications, but it was always presented to me like you can’t rush him through special needs modifications to the regular program, he might just do special needs modifications.

 

And then later when he did do the starfish exercise for retained reflexes, that was presented to me like “he is able to do it now†and not at all like he could/should have done it 4-5 years earlier.

 

I don’t know anyone in person whose child has moved through so fast (as it comes across to me) but I have only ever known anyone in person doing it whose child was qualifying for OT at school, so it is kids who are delayed enough to qualify for school OT, which is hard to do.

 

Hmm. Dd struggles with crab crawl, but I can't tell if it's just hard to lift her own weight or what. She seems pretty smooth with the snow angels. I'll have her do it at the office next week and get some feedback from the dr. I asked ds last night to do a jumping jack. He struggled at first and then was doing okay but I don't think he's quite where maybe his peers are with that kind of thing. I guess I can ask him to do it again today and see how it looks.

 

I got dd a bike with training wheels recently because it was only $20 and she's shown interest in bikes. Well, she's kinda in between the tricycle and big bike. We have both. She tried them both. She hasn't quite got the understanding of the peddling on her own thing on either, really. Ds hasn't tried to ride a bike in years. He's in between sizes we tried at bike shops last summer? I asked him if he wanted to put his Christmas money toward a bike and he said no. He has never ridden a bike without training wheels and I'd like to see how he'd do. I'm currently saving up to get him swim lessons. Mostly from a safety standpoint I guess, but also for the physical activity/coordination aspect. I just started a PT job (a few hours a month tutoring). I hope it works out because then I could pay for the swim lessons that way.

 

I asked dd to try to connect different fingers from some palmer test I read about last night. She struggled and didn't want to do it. Ds can do it so that's good.

 

Regarding legos, ds never got super into them. He struggled with them in the past. Now he might play with them once in a while. I remember when most kids were into Legos I was buying him a second set of Duplos figuring they were less frustrating.

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I have an impression like exercises *have* to be done in a smooth, controlled manner to be effective. If kids are jerky or can’t slow down, my understanding is it’s not going to do much for them.

 

So I hear about things that are for kids who can’t do some exercises because they can’t do them smooth and controlled (no matter with what modification or small amount of time).

 

So them what I have heard is they look for things the child can do or look for things that can be cooperative so that someone else is regulating the speed. With some someone else is coordinating the body movements also.

 

And then kind-of work up to being able to do the more advanced exercises, but maybe it takes years.

 

 

I don’t know anyone in person whose child has moved through so fast (as it comes across to me) but I have only ever known anyone in person doing it whose child was qualifying for OT at school, so it is kids who are delayed enough to qualify for school OT, which is hard to do.

 

I think that some kind of exercises are rhythmic on purpose, but others, it's more about the slow and controlled. But, that's kind of splitting hairs, and I don't mean to do that. It's just that we have done more than one kind of exercise for reflexes, and the rhythmic movement training ones were smaller movements that were meant to have a rocking motion most of the time. The other exercises we did were smooth and controlled (once they were understood by the child and the child was ready), but they were larger body movements that were not necessarily smooth in the same way as the RMT. Just throwing that out there because I think of those things as different. I think RMT breaks the movements down into smaller parts than the exercises we did in VT, but neither of my kids did the same exercises entirely either. They had different strengths and weaknesses.

 

 

On why PT and OT, when, and how long...

My kids had a very spiky profile of abilities--there were things they weren't "supposed" to be able to do unless they could do this other thing first, and that other skill was not in place--this happened a lot with them.

 

My younger son, who has more issues, seemed to have regressed in coordination over time. This is probably due to some additional factors besides retained reflexes though--he has a genetic abnormality. But, for instance, when he was a toddler, we thought he'd be super coordinated. From the time he could walk, I could roll a ball to him, and he could run up on alternate feet and know just where to be to kick it. He didn't have to adjust--he would end up in just the right spot over and over without any practice at this skill. But then, at 10, watching him button a shirt is painful. It's just so wild and misaligned! He was all but riding a bike and then lost the ability. Then he'd learn, only to lose it again (he can now). 

 

For my older son, we opted for OT for sensory issues, and coordination got better.

 

Both kids needed VT before OT would amount to much, and we figured that out by pure luck--our regular eye doc is a COVD. At first, she thought they were fine, but it became clear that when they were tired, all bets were  off--their eyes and brains were reinterpreting visual data incorrectly.

 

Knowing what I know now, I would very much have pursued PT right after VT, and then worked on OT, or I would've gone to a combined PT/OT practice right after VT. But VT improved things so enormously (due to the reflex work) that we got a lot of mileage out of it before more symptoms caught up to us coordination-wise. 

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Heartlikealion — I think see what they say! I would get the comments about jerky movements and he doesn’t as much now (I only see it rarely) but there is a thing with some kids having jerky motor movements who have autism, that I am familiar with because I see it with kids I know through my younger son (who has autism) and I just know it now, and its a bit of an autism thing I think, though I’m not sure. But my younger son who has autism is not this way, he just never has been.

 

Kbutton — Okay I get it when you mention RMT. That makes a lot of sense when it’s RMT! I don’t know why this is but where we lived they would have training in different systems, and they would say RMT was most foundational. But that is not what my older son was doing when he was older! So that makes more sense to me now. (Edit and two OTs at least went to the more in-depth out-of-town training where they go and stay in a hotel.... but for the more basic training they did offer it at this workshop.).

 

I had a chance to attend a RMT training as part of an autism workshop one time, and I had a choice between that or seeing a speech therapist. I picked to see the speech therapist, but it was the kind of thing where a lot of people from school went for CEUs and said it was really good, but it wasn’t what they were doing with my son, but I knew other kids they did it with for sure. I have heard really good things about it, but it isn’t what I think of when I say retained reflexes because I think of another set of exercises! But it does make sense to me now.

 

I think my older son had a different set of issues to some extent, because it was more about coordination for him and less about sensory. And then I have heard really good things about RMT as far as sensory and just connecting physical sensations and I think motor control, and it’s not the same kind of thing.

 

So I think it’s a broader term than I was thinking, or maybe people have said “retained reflexes†with me when it isn’t quite the same thing that other people mean in another town. That has happened with me before.

 

I have also heard of kids who have to re-integrate after they have a growth support or some development in another area. I don’t think it’s exactly regressing sometimes (with your son it could be because it sounds a little different) but I’ve heard it’s like needing to re-calibrate because of other changes happening, and I think for some kids it’s just kind-of expected — which is also part of why I don’t think of it as being a one-time thing. But at the same time — it sounds like it is for a lot of kids. I think on this in some ways my reference points are kids who have more severe issues with this stuff than a lot of kids, which makes sense too.

Edited by Lecka
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We did VT exercises at home, but my daughter developed full blown PTSD and when I told the optometrist that given we'd given it six months with NO progress, per his own testing, we were quitting, and the jerk told me she would wind up in prison if I quit, I was a bit soured on VT.  Although honestly, I think it still probably had the potential to help, but quality of services makes a HUGE difference. 

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My son has asyncrhonous progress. In the beginning he could not do a proper jumping jack. I think with biking a balance bike is the way to go. some people buy a bike and then take certain components off to make it a balance bike. I didn't do that but it would have really helped my son. Swinging is another great exercise and monkey bars. It took over a month to get my son to do a smooth movement. Some of it is he knows he isnt' good at it so he starts acting silly. 

 

Scooters with 3 wheels are good for building up balance and integration. If they can do it have them perfect it with their non dominant foot on the scooter and over time try the other one. Table tennis would be awesome but my son really can not do it. We tried toss games like the one where the ball sticks to the paddle. 

 

I ask Kathy at Pyramid of potential about functional exercises like these that might help integrate reflexes but she did not think that was the way to go. Redundant replication of the recommended exercises is what they push. It is hard to keep interest and motivation up but I am sure it works. 

Edited by exercise_guru
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Went to the optometrist today. She didn't care if I kept eye contact with them or not during exercises. I asked is this partly for retained reflexes? She said yes. I asked if both kids appeared to have that... she didn't sound 100% sure but was leaning toward yes it sounded like. I asked about the number of times a day/number of min. Basically yes, it would help if I did it more often and at least 5 min. of exercises. She did the balance board with dd today. She wanted dd to stay balanced while she looked at the dr's nose and then give the dr. a high five without looking at the hand. It was challenging for dd and something I can practice at home. She also had a stick we held horizontal for dd to try to pull up on. During that exercise dd was supposed to look at my nose or eyes. Supposedly dd's eyes were super straight during the balance board exercises when done correctly, but I don't always see it. I can't even tell if anything we're doing is helping her vision! But it seems to be good for her motor skills. She's improved a lot on the crab crawl, which is the one she struggles with the most. She was going slowly but keeping her butt off the ground for the most part.

 

The dr. said no charge for this follow up visit. I was super relieved. :hurray: We go back in 3 months.

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