Jump to content

Menu

Winter Olympics


Katy
 Share

Recommended Posts

 Korea has a Russian cross country skier. Not sure how/why he immigrated there but there you go.... 

Savchenko and Massot, the gold winning figure skaters obtained German citizenship in order to compete for Germany.

 

After Russia was banned, many russians chose to compete for other countries because the support systems were better if they affiliated themselves to another country, though many compete as OAR - Olympic Athletes from Russia.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The team relay in speed skating looks so chaotic! The announcers are getting all into it, and I'm so confused, trying to figure out which member for each team is currently racing? And which team is in the lead? And where did those skaters who just tagged out go? Are they back in the middle of the oval? How many skaters does each team have? How many laps did that skater just do?

 

eta: The more I try to figure it out, I think part of the confusion stems from it taking place on the figure skating rink, so it has minimal speed skating markings, with the racing lane only designated by the little black "cones" on the ice. 

Edited by JIN MOUSA
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The team relay in speed skating looks so chaotic! The announcers are getting all into it, and I'm so confused, trying to figure out which member for each team is currently racing? And which team is in the lead? And where did those skaters who just tagged out go? Are they back in the middle of the oval? How many skaters does each team have? How many laps did that skater just do?

 

eta: The more I try to figure it out, I think part of the confusion stems from it taking place on the figure skating rink, so it has minimal speed skating markings, with the racing lane only designated by the little black "cones" on the ice. 

 

I totally agree. If the sport needs more confusion and craziness to attract viewers, they are doing a great job with this sport.  :laugh:

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Savchenko and Massot, the gold winning figure skaters obtained German citizenship in order to compete for Germany.

 

After Russia was banned, many russians chose to compete for other countries because the support systems were better if they affiliated themselves to another country, though many compete as OAR - Olympic Athletes from Russia.

 

It may have been a great opportunity for some athletes to get out of the Russian system. And if other countries can benefit from these well-trained individuals and support them, then why not? 

 

It's not just the immediate medal potential that these people can contribute, but future leadership, information sharing and coaching. 

Edited by wintermom
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm waiting patiently for the Big Air snowboarding qualifier. In the meantime, I have to make it through the curling. ;) There are 2 different curling events going on, and I don't care about either of them. I must be a horrible Canadian. :laugh:

I haven’t seen any curling, except what I looked up on YouTube to show my kids.

 

Right now it’s that short track relay on NBC (you’re right it’s weird!) and ladies figure skating on NBC sports. But I’m about to be bumped off our tv for basketball.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven’t seen any curling, except what I looked up on YouTube to show my kids.

 

Right now it’s that short track relay on NBC (you’re right it’s weird!) and ladies figure skating on NBC sports. But I’m about to be bumped off our tv for basketball.

 

I've been watching cbc, and they love to show curling. They also show hockey. I hate both these sports. I said it. I'm a double bad Canadian.  :laugh:

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been watching cbc, and they love to show curling. They also show hockey. I hate both these sports. I said it. I'm a double bad Canadian. :laugh:

Hahaha! My husband works for a Canadian company. As far as he knows his coworkers don’t follow curling either. They are huge hockey fans though.
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Getting a chance to compete in the Olympics is just as much a political game as it is an athletic success. It can be just as political to get a place on the Pee Wee AAA hockey team in one's hometown, or a place on any US college basketball team. Why should Olympics be any different? It's about the money and power, and countries and individuals will use the rules - or simply break the rules - to try and do what they want to do.

 

I have to say I smile really big every time I see that Russian athletes have no gold medals. :D Whatever craziness the IOC has done and continues to do, they did the right thing banning proven doping regimes.

 

And I scratch my head about why a curling athlete would need doping?

I wondered the same thing. How could that possibly help?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Regarding doping and curling, I read an article that said the new brooms they use require a lot more strength, and the guy who was caught doping was in mixed doubles, which is a two-person team instead of four, so there is little rest time between shots and much more sweeping for each person. The drug the Russian tested positive for supposedly helps with strength and endurance, and some of the other curlers were saying that it could provide a bit of an advantage.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Regarding doping and curling, I read an article that said the new brooms they use require a lot more strength, and the guy who was caught doping was in mixed doubles, which is a two-person team instead of four, so there is little rest time between shots and much more sweeping for each person. The drug the Russian tested positive for supposedly helps with strength and endurance, and some of the other curlers were saying that it could provide a bit of an advantage.

 

Maybe that's my problem with sweeping in the house - requires too much strength and endurance.  :laugh:

 

Compared to every other sport in the winter olympics, curling is the absolute lowest test of strength and endurance. Give me a break. I hope that guy is so embarrassed he hides in a box. 

 

The curling rinks in Canada come equipped with ashtrays and beer holders because people drink and smoke while playing. It's NOT a huge strain to curl. 

Edited by wintermom
  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

:( no cable so we had to watch downhill skiing instead of figure skating. I only got to see 2 skaters before the slopes took over. :(

I signed up for a free 7 day trial with YouTube tv and have been able to watch figure skating the last couple nights. I even discovered tonight that I could rewind to the beginning of the competition even though I hadn’t been watching it!

 

You do have to give a cc# and if you forget to cancel it’s $35.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Earlier today on one of those jumps the guy was way high up and landed wrong, on his tailbone. He stood up afterword, but I was shocked he hadn’t broken his back. That fall had to have hurt.

There was also a pretty nasty fall on the freeskiing half pipe qualifying runs. A guy landed on the deck (not in the pipe) and just flopped down into the pipe like a rag doll. There were medics tending to him for a while, and he was eventually able to walk away.

 

Add this one to the no-go list for my kids. I should maybe stop watching Olympics (or sports in general), lest I come to the conclusion that they all need bubble wrap full suits for everything...

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm waiting patiently for the Big Air snowboarding qualifier. In the meantime, I have to make it through the curling. ;) There are 2 different curling events going on, and I don't care about either of them. I must be a horrible Canadian.  :laugh:

 

 

LoL. I'd rather watch curling than big air but what I am really waiting for is more bob sled. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just watched an event called ski cross (or similar) and a Canadian flew high over one of the jumps and crashed terribly.  Has anyone heard anything about his condition? He had to be taken off the slope. Hope he is okay. 

Edited by Liz CA
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't watched what I "taped" last night of the ladies' short programs but heard some results about the 3 US skaters on the news this morning. Maybe this coverage will be different, but after watching bits and pieces of figure skating, I wish it were less about the big jumps. 

 

We decided I'm wrong about compulsories, and I concede that point, but there are required elements that used to be mentioned. Maybe I missed it. I could look it up. But I know there are X amount of rotations required in spins. How many? What is the footwork requirement? And I know they're required because it used to be covered by the commentators. Not anymore. 

 

I love the jumps and Nathan Chen et al are amazing. I would like better explanations of requirements. I did look it up. Would prefer a short primer from the commentators a short video before each event. 

 

Going back under my rock now. 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Has anyone mentioned Elizabeth Swaney? She basically gamed the system and traveled to qualifying competitions with few competitors in order to get a spot on Hungary's team (she's American, but her grandparents are from there). She didn't violate any rules and can claim to be an Olympic athlete, but she also looked rather ridiculous competing on the halfpipe against people who actually looked like they deserved to be there.

 

I've seen heartwarming stories about international competitors who hardly even knew how to swim competing in the Olympics before and didn't have a negative reaction, but this feels different to me. She says it's an honor to compete in the Olympics, but to me there's nothing honorable about what she did, though I admit she is certainly persistent. It sounds like they're going to make changes to the qualification process as a result.

 

It seems kind of pointless to me from her POV.

 

But as far as gaming the system, even within the rules, that has been going on forever, often to benefit nationalist ambition.  It's affected the whole shape of the Olympics over the years.  This seems like a pretty minor in comparison to me, something that wouldn't even appeal to many people.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The men's Big Air qualifying runs were IN-SANE. My husband and I were floored that by the end of Heat Two, the guys had to score a 90.50 in order to QUALIFY for the finals. They were going super big for their tricks last night. I can't wait to watch the finals, we have THREE Canadian men in the top 12 and all three of them are good enough to medal. The Canadian guy who just missed getting in to the finals is a local kid, and I was really rooting for him. I think he was way better than the guy from GB who made it into the sixth place spot, but I'm probably biased lol.

 

Women's Big Air finals are tonight, if I have my schedule figured out right. They'll be the first Olympic medalists for this sport ever. Pretty cool. I hope they get good conditions (the wind has whipped up for the womens events, and those girls are pretty tiny so it's already hard enough for them to get enough speed to get big air time).

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just watched an event called ski cross (or similar) and a Canadian flew high over one of the jumps and crashed terribly.  Has anyone heard anything about his condition? He had to be taken off the slope. Hope he is okay. 

 

I found this on the cbc olympic website: Del Bosco is in stable condition with a suspected pelvis injury.

 
Good news for him that he's stable and it isn't a head injury. Hope he recovers well. 
  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also, it's not even reasonable that I am this upset about this but re: men's snowboarding last night. They should NOT have had two separate qualifying heats. Tyler Nicholson, the Canadian kid from Ontario, would have scored in the TOP THREE in the first heat, but came in 7th in the 2nd heat. There are guys who didn't make it from Heat Two (because that heat was stacked and everyone was on fire) who would have blown the guys from Heat One right outta the water. If they'd had to all run against each other, in one heat, we would have a much more accurate top 12 going to the finals, IMHO.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also, it's not even reasonable that I am this upset about this but re: men's snowboarding last night. They should NOT have had two separate qualifying heats. Tyler Nicholson, the Canadian kid from Ontario, would have scored in the TOP THREE in the first heat, but came in 7th in the 2nd heat. There are guys who didn't make it from Heat Two (because that heat was stacked and everyone was on fire) who would have blown the guys from Heat One right outta the water. If they'd had to all run against each other, in one heat, we would have a much more accurate top 12 going to the finals, IMHO.

 

Was the qualifying by rank in their heat or by the scores they received? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Was the qualifying by rank in their heat or by the scores they received?

Top 6 from Heat One go to the finals. Top 6 from Heat Two go to the finals.

 

But a few of the guys who moved on from Heat One, wouldn't have had scores that beat guys who LOST in Heat Two. JUST to make it to the 6th place spot in Heat Two, they had to score 90.50 - - I'm sure there were guys in the middle of the top 6 from Heat One who didn't even have a 90 or higher score.

 

If we want the 12 best boarders to compete in the finals, it should be the 12 best. I am sure there is a reason they did it this way, but I can't think of one that makes sense. The women's big air qualifiers weren't in heats, they were competing against the whole group. Top 12 moved on to the finals.

 

I can't even figure out why I'm so emotionally invested in this particular issue but it's really bothering me more than it probably should...lol.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Top 6 from Heat One go to the finals. Top 6 from Heat Two go to the finals.

 

But a few of the guys who moved on from Heat One, wouldn't have had scores that beat guys who LOST in Heat Two. JUST to make it to the 6th place spot in Heat Two, they had to score 90.50 - - I'm sure there were guys in the middle of the top 6 from Heat One who didn't even have a 90 or higher score.

 

If we want the 12 best boarders to compete in the finals, it should be the 12 best. I am sure there is a reason they did it this way, but I can't think of one that makes sense. The women's big air qualifiers weren't in heats, they were competing against the whole group. Top 12 moved on to the finals.

 

I can't even figure out why I'm so emotionally invested in this particular issue but it's really bothering me more than it probably should...lol.

 

I *think* that the way it worked is that everyone competed in the first heat and the top 6 advanced.  The rest of the field was given a second chance to improve their score and the top 6 of that group also advanced.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't watched what I "taped" last night of the ladies' short programs but heard some results about the 3 US skaters on the news this morning. Maybe this coverage will be different, but after watching bits and pieces of figure skating, I wish it were less about the big jumps. 

 

We decided I'm wrong about compulsories, and I concede that point, but there are required elements that used to be mentioned. Maybe I missed it. I could look it up. But I know there are X amount of rotations required in spins. How many? What is the footwork requirement? And I know they're required because it used to be covered by the commentators. Not anymore. 

 

I love the jumps and Nathan Chen et al are amazing. I would like better explanations of requirements. I did look it up. Would prefer a short primer from the commentators a short video before each event. 

 

Going back under my rock now. 

 

I totally agree about providing more informative coverage of these events. It feels like a missed opportunity to educate the public and increase interest in and appreciation of the sport. 

 

I'm annoyed at the scads of 2 to 3 minute human interest clips on NBC's Olympics website, combined with the exclusion of any explanatory information. I like the human interest side of the Olympics, and I think that knowing more about the details of a sport can actually expand engagement.

 

I think this plays into a larger issue of using the internet to make ourselves dumber. Obviously I'm way off topic at this point ...

 

 

edited to clear up some grammar 

Edited by JIN MOUSA
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I totally agree about providing more informative coverage of these events. It feels like a missed opportunity to educate the public and increase interest in and appreciation of the sport. 

 

I'm annoyed at the scads of 2 to 3 minute human interest clips on NBC's Olympics website, combined with the exclusion of any explanatory information. I like the human interest side of the Olympics, and I think that knowing more about the details of a sport can actually expand engagement.

 

I think this plays into a larger issue of using the internet to make ourselves dumber. Obviously I'm way off topic at this point ...

 

 

edited to clear up some grammar 

 

I've found the cbc commentators to be knowledgeable and pretty good at sharing relevant information about the various sports. I have to go looking for the specific events I want to see, but once I find it and start watching it, I'm more than pleased with what I've been learning. 

 

I can choose to watch the athlete bios, as they are on their own for the most part. I've been avoiding the "Evening Program" or "Morning Program" options, though, and going straight to the specific events themselves. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I *think* that the way it worked is that everyone competed in the first heat and the top 6 advanced. The rest of the field was given a second chance to improve their score and the top 6 of that group also advanced.

No, the two heats were totally separate groups of snowboarders. Heat One was first, and had, I think 14 boarders. 6 went on. Heat two had a whole other group of boarders, and 6 moved on.

 

Heat One, after the second run this was the standings - you can see the 6 QF runs in that heat:

https://www.olympic.org/pyeongchang-2018/results/en/snowboard/results-men-s-big-air-qual-000102-.htm

 

Heat Two, after the second run and you can see the six QFers from that heat and their scores are MUCH higher than that of the first heat riders.

https://www.olympic.org/pyeongchang-2018/results/en/snowboard/results-men-s-big-air-qual-000202-.htm

 

The 7th place rider in Heat Two had 89.25 - and out of the Heat One riders, only the SECOND place qualifier had a higher score. That seems really crazy to me.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've found the cbc commentators to be knowledgeable and pretty good at sharing relevant information about the various sports. I have to go looking for the specific events I want to see, but once I find it and start watching it, I'm more than pleased with what I've been learning. 

 

I can choose to watch the athlete bios, as they are on their own for the most part. I've been avoiding the "Evening Program" or "Morning Program" options, though, and going straight to the specific events themselves. 

 

Yes, I mostly prefer the full event replays. NBC seems to have some sort of agreement with the Olympic Broadcasting Service (I think that's what OBS stands for). The commentators are generally okay, but you can tell they get short shrift when it comes to production resources - very few graphics, minimal editing, etc. 

 

I'm watching the ladies short program this morning, and they were really very kind to the young Swedish girl who was so disappointed, saying she should be so proud of herself and that they were sad to see her hanging her head. 

 

Sometimes I'll watch NBC's Gold Zone - two hours covering all the medals awarded that day. At the very least, it's efficient. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, the two heats were totally separate groups of snowboarders. Heat One was first, and had, I think 14 boarders. 6 went on. Heat two had a whole other group of boarders, and 6 moved on.

 

Heat One, after the second run this was the standings - you can see the 6 QF runs in that heat:

https://www.olympic.org/pyeongchang-2018/results/en/snowboard/results-men-s-big-air-qual-000102-.htm

 

Heat Two, after the second run and you can see the six QFers from that heat and their scores are MUCH higher than that of the first heat riders.

https://www.olympic.org/pyeongchang-2018/results/en/snowboard/results-men-s-big-air-qual-000202-.htm

 

The 7th place rider in Heat Two had 89.25 - and out of the Heat One riders, only the SECOND place qualifier had a higher score. That seems really crazy to me.

 

 

Did they have to run them on different days, such that the scores were impacted by differing snow/weather conditions?

 

It does seem like such a toss up, with the final results reflecting the composition of the qualifying heats more than the skill of the individual riders. 

 

It almost seems like the soccer/football World Cup, with some groups being stronger than others, but 2 teams from every group advance regardless. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Did they have to run them on different days, such that the scores were impacted by differing snow/weather conditions?

 

It does seem like such a toss up, with the final results reflecting the composition of the qualifying heats more than the skill of the individual riders.

 

It almost seems like the soccer/football World Cup, with some groups being stronger than others, but 2 teams from every group advance regardless.

Nope. One heat straight after the other. Each heat got two runs, and their best score out of the two is the one that would determine if they went to the finals.

 

I think, if I were one of the riders who did NOT make it from heat two, but had higher scores than the guys who went on from heat one, I'd be really disappointed. The second heat also was STACKED with serious talent, which also seemed unbalanced as far as my DH and I were discussing as we watched.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, the two heats were totally separate groups of snowboarders. Heat One was first, and had, I think 14 boarders. 6 went on. Heat two had a whole other group of boarders, and 6 moved on.

 

Heat One, after the second run this was the standings - you can see the 6 QF runs in that heat:

https://www.olympic.org/pyeongchang-2018/results/en/snowboard/results-men-s-big-air-qual-000102-.htm

 

Heat Two, after the second run and you can see the six QFers from that heat and their scores are MUCH higher than that of the first heat riders.

https://www.olympic.org/pyeongchang-2018/results/en/snowboard/results-men-s-big-air-qual-000202-.htm

 

The 7th place rider in Heat Two had 89.25 - and out of the Heat One riders, only the SECOND place qualifier had a higher score. That seems really crazy to me.

 

We didn't watch the big air competition; I didn't realize that they would use different rules from the other snowboarding competitions that we did watch.

 

Yes, it is definitely crazy.  I love sports, but sometimes the rules make no sense to me.

 

I found this article:  http://www.espn.com/olympics/story/_/id/22523588/when-do-two-halves-not-make-whole-olympic-big-air-qualifying

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We didn't watch the big air competition; I didn't realize that they would use different rules from the other snowboarding competitions that we did watch.

 

Yes, it is definitely crazy.  I love sports, but sometimes the rules make no sense to me.

 

I found this article:  http://www.espn.com/olympics/story/_/id/22523588/when-do-two-halves-not-make-whole-olympic-big-air-qualifying

 

I was about to post that same article. I'm so annoyed with reporting that doesn't answer the obvious question; in this case: why?

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We didn't watch the big air competition; I didn't realize that they would use different rules from the other snowboarding competitions that we did watch.

 

Yes, it is definitely crazy. I love sports, but sometimes the rules make no sense to me.

 

I found this article: http://www.espn.com/olympics/story/_/id/22523588/when-do-two-halves-not-make-whole-olympic-big-air-qualifying

Yeah. That article nailed a couple of the issues I have with this set-up. There are some SERIOUSLY talented boarders who won't get their shot at the podium, because of the heat-based setup.

 

I don't think I'd be as annoyed with this, except that they didn't set the women up in heats. They all competed in one group in the qualifiers. So it's not like "this is just how Big Air is done". They did it normally for the ladies, and this ass-backwards way for the guys.

 

It's totally and utterly irrational that I am this annoyed, really. Lol

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah. That article nailed a couple of the issues I have with this set-up. There are some SERIOUSLY talented boarders who won't get their shot at the podium, because of the heat-based setup.

 

I don't think I'd be as annoyed with this, except that they didn't set the women up in heats. They all competed in one group in the qualifiers. So it's not like "this is just how Big Air is done". They did it normally for the ladies, and this ass-backwards way for the guys.

 

It's totally and utterly irrational that I am this annoyed, really. Lol

 

I'm right there with you in annoyance - mine directed at poor reporting.

 

Someone made an intentional decision to do the men's qualification in this way. Why? How long has it been structured like this? What are the pros (surely there must be some, right)? 

 

Fitting in with my previous comment of the internet pushing us to use our brains less, it seems like so much "news" is solely aimed at whipping up people's indignation, then moving on to something else. Why educate when you can agitate? Why inform when you can enrage?

 

*steps off soapbox* 

 

Back to the Olympics. 

Edited by JIN MOUSA
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm right there with you in annoyance - mine directed at poor reporting.

 

Someone made an intentional decision to do the men's qualification in this way. Why? How long has it been structured like this? What are the pros (surely there must be some, right)?

 

Fitting in with my previous comment of the internet pushing us to use our brains less, it seems like so much "news" is solely aimed at whipping up people's indignation, then moving on to something else. Why educate when you can agitate?

 

*steps off soapbox*

 

Back to the Olympics.

I would appreciate a "why". I've been reading a few articles today and no one has addressed it that I've found.

 

This is the first Winter Olympics to have Big Air as an event. So, it could be possible that they just weren't sure how to handle it. Big Air has been around for a while (outside Olympics) and the men's riders are HUGE talents with huge tricks and maybe they needed a way to handle that. I don't know. That's all conjecture.

 

I'm going to go make some tea and try to calm myself a little ::lol::

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That can be really frustrating when the judging seems unfair. 

 

One sport I've been really impressed with is freestyle skiing ski cross. The commentator was excellent, explaining outright that athletes aren't supposed to intentionally bump and crash into other competitors, but that falls are going to occur. You can get unlucky and get taken out, or you can be very strong and manage to stay on your feet, but everyone accepts that this is the sport they've chosen and these are the circumstances. 

 

I really like that kind of honesty and reality.  I think that short-track speed skating needs to adopt something similar. It's kind of ridiculous out there with all those skaters, long blades and the expectation of no one getting in the way of others. Just doesn't seem realistic. They need a little more high speed collisions, danger and real crashes to toughen the sport up a little. ;)

Edited by wintermom
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would appreciate a "why". I've been reading a few articles today and no one has addressed it that I've found.

 

 

The placement of the athletes in the 2 heats is by their ranking in the world snowboard tour. Rank 1 goes in Heat 1, Rank 2 in Heat 2, Rank 3 in Heat 1, Rank 4 in Heat 2, and so on.  Then the top 6 athletes in each heat go on to the final.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Finally caught up and watched womens short program.

 

Please.

 

Not. One. More. Maroon. Skating. Dress.

 

Please. It is my least favorite color and it has been a popular clothing color for a few seasons now. I'm sick of it. Ugh.

 

/end pointless rant

 

That's how my oldest daughter feels about French music. She's threatening not to watch anymore if anybody else skates to je suis malade!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Finally caught up and watched womens short program.

 

Please.

 

Not. One. More. Maroon. Skating. Dress.

 

Please. It is my least favorite color and it has been a popular clothing color for a few seasons now. I'm sick of it. Ugh.

 

/end pointless rant

I agree. I do like the color, but this was just too much. No variety. Was there some huge clearance sale on maroon/burgundy figure skating costume fabric?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...