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Southern Ivy

Update, post 66 -----We got a diagnosis! *aka: Follow your gut!*

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I remember that, it definitely isn’t accurate. Just consider it a baseline for how ADHD meds and the filter work. Really! It’s not her IQ.

 

It’s not even supposedly her number, because nobody thought it was a valid representation of her ability.

Right - I mean, I KNOW it's not her IQ and the neuropsych said it was more than likely not accurate, but she still put it there. It bothers me, even though I know it's ridiculously inaccurate. lol It's like sand in my shoe, just irritates.  :lol:

Edited by Southern Ivy
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IQ was supposedly 76. Which is BS. There's no freaking way she's a 76. We actually just debating whether or not to take her back for a reevaluation. (We were told to bring her back when she's on meds for a year which is in May, but I'm not going back to that neuropsych.) 

 

If this was a standard IQ test like the Weschler or the Stanford-Binet, it's almost certainly a major underestimate. The "non-verbal" portions of standard IQ tests are still heavily dependent on receptive language skills. Any child with moderate-to-severe CAPD is going to have receptive language difficulties, and therefore underperform on the standard IQ tests.

 

My daughter had almost a two standard deviation difference between the "non-verbal" portion of the WPPSI and the totally non-verbal Leiter. Her lowest subtest on the Leiter was higher than the highest subtest on the WPPSI.

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If this was a standard IQ test like the Weschler or the Stanford-Binet, it's almost certainly a major underestimate. The "non-verbal" portions of standard IQ tests are still heavily dependent on receptive language skills. Any child with moderate-to-severe CAPD is going to have receptive language difficulties, and therefore underperform on the standard IQ tests.

 

My daughter had almost a two standard deviation difference between the "non-verbal" portion of the WPPSI and the totally non-verbal Leiter. Her lowest subtest on the Leiter was higher than the highest subtest on the WPPSI.

 

Yes, it was the Weschler Preschool and Primary. Strangely enough, her receptive language, based on the CELF-5, were within normal limits. 

 

I think I need to do the re-eval just for my own sanity. :)

I'll try to go in August. Give her more time with the filter and time to catch up somewhat before pursuing more testing. 

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You might be patient. Is she newly 6 in August? I get that it irks you, and I think it's problematic because it has this psychological effect of changing expectations. My only point is let her language catch up. Let it REALLY catch up. Does she have retained reflexes? Get those integrated, get her filters, get her speech therapy, and wait till you have a moment of wow, I think I'm really seeing who she is now. When you have that, THEN schedule the fresh evals.

 

I think you'll know when that happens. I've had it with ds. We have times where it's obvious we're not seeing all that is inside, and we have times when we've had a bump or jump and it's clear for a while they're we're getting more of a glimpse of what is inside. I would be very patient on this, because you have this gap where you have to wait to re-run it. 

 

The other way to think through it is to ask whether fresh psych evals would give you more info besides an IQ number. They might, sure. I'm just saying it's another way to think through it and think through the timing. Like wait for a need, wait till you have new questions you need answered. I just think you have such an earth-shattering, jet fuel pack, wow kinda change about to happen that it's really hard to say ok, now we're seeing where she is. I think she's going to unfold. You could also ask your people in Colorado how long it takes to see that full effect of unfolding and progress in language, etc. 

 

And yeah, the CELF is a funky tool. They don't norm speech or consider discrepancy with IQ, and yet it's totally reasonable (to my pea brain, to many people's brains) that kids with a higher IQ need higher language skills to do the advanced work their brains are trying to do. Ie. her set point, where her brain is trying to get to, may be higher than norms. I've hit that issue over and over with my ds, because you'll have one professional saying oh look, discrepancy in academics, and another person saying the "average" and low average language scores didn't matter, even though it's terribly obvious that a gifted child with 20th percentile language scores cannot POSSIBLY do gifted level work. You can't read and comprehend at IQ level if you can't understand the language. But, hello, nobody is allowed to say that, even though it's obvious.

 

So be patient, ride it out, watch the changes. I think this is super cool. I mean, I just can't even imagine how she could blossom over the next 6 months to a year going from 50% input to 90%. That is just ASTONISHING. Think about that. She's gonna BLOW YOUR MIND. Journal it. Write down where she is now on a lot of parameters. You could start a blog. Or don't blog, just draw lines in the sand for function on a lot of life skills. Write it out so you can see the change. With my ds, change happens so subtly that we get to someplace a year later and we're like wow, how did that happen?

 

When do they come? Do you have to go back to get them installed?

Edited by PeterPan
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APD is a generic term, for a range of different auditory processing disorders.

So that is just a general term, which creates some confusion.

 

But as for any conjecture about the Filter?  I found the patent application for it:

 

Apparatus and methods for mitigating impairments due to central auditory nervous system binaural phase-time asynchrony

Publication number: 20060215845

Abstract: Pathological binaural phase time delay (PBTD) asynchrony is measured at a variety of frequencies and speech stimuli to develop a BPTD profile for a subject. A corrective device (600, 1000) is designed to apply clinical PBTD to compensate for the subject's pathological BPTD. An electronic device (500) is used to measure the subject's ability to comprehend words at a variety of relative time delays between ears to estimate the ideal overall relative time delay. The optimal relative phase shift at a variety of frequencies is also measured. An electronic device (600) may be used to correct the pathological BPTD by delaying sound in different frequency bands differently to the target ear, according to the BPTD profile, or a passive filtered earplug (1000) may be used to correct smaller amounts of BPTD.

Type: Application

Filed: May 31, 2006

Publication date: September 28, 2006

Inventors: Joan Burleigh, Michael Thompson, Susan James

 

Binaural phase time delay asynchrony, has long been established as a major factor in APD.   

{which basically means that the signal from one ear, takes longer than the other.)

 

What they have developed, is a scientific approach.

Which firstly involves precisely identifying the 'time delay' for an individual.

Then they have developed Filters, which cause a precise time delay. So that the brain recieves the signal from both ears at the same time.

But they have further identified that this time delay, can be limited to certain frequencies.

So that the Filter can be made, to only delay the related frequencies.

 

Their is no controversy or conjecture about this, as is it scientifically verifiable.

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Fascinating. So if this ear filter is fixing the asynchrony, what do HAs do when they use them for APD?

 

And then as a total aside, how does binaural phase time delay explain issues with background noise? 

 

Or, put another way, do the filters help with background noise issues and how/why?

Edited by PeterPan

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You might be patient. Is she newly 6 in August?

Does she have retained reflexes? 

You could also ask your people in Colorado how long it takes to see that full effect of unfolding and progress in language, etc. 

When do they come? Do you have to go back to get them installed?

 

She'll be 6 at the end of April. Our yearly re-eval should have been at the end of May, but I'm going to push it out. 

The only retained reflex she was shown to have was ATNR. We've been on an OT break. We're switching over to the OTs at our speech clinic. I honestly don't see a huge difference with her in or out of OT.  :huh: At lot of what they were doing was supposedly to help her learn to focus, but that may not be an issue now. 

I did talk to Dr. Locke, since we had all discussed the possibility of dyslexia. I know APD and dyslexia can run hand in hand (Barton even says APD IS dyslexia.) Dr. Locke said to give it a few months as well. She said we've taken ADHD off the table with meds. We're taking APD off the table with the filter. A few months will let her show what she can do when those two things are handled. 

 

Are you asking when the filters come in? Our appointment was Feb 5. It takes 3 weeks to get them, so assuming they started making it on Feb 6, we should definitely have it by March 1, I would think.  Sometimes, there needs to be some tweaks or adjustments and you send it back. But hopefully, it's perfect from the get-go. 

 

As for installing? You just put it in yourself. 

 

 

 

 

APD is a generic term, for a range of different auditory processing disorders.
So that is just a general term, which creates some confusion.
 
But as for any conjecture about the Filter?  I found the patent application for it:
 
Their is no controversy or conjecture about this, as is it scientifically verifiable.

 

 

Geodob - you're my hero. I was looking for it, but doing a craptastic job! 

 

Fascinating. So if this ear filter is fixing the asynchrony, what do HAs do when they use them for APD?

 

And then as a total aside, how does binaural phase time delay explain issues with background noise? 

 

Or, put another way, do the filters help with background noise issues and how/why?

HAs? 

 

The filters do help with background noise in that with the timing delay and whatever else they do with it, it makes it so it's not as loud. I think since you're not hearing EVERYTHING pretty much 2xs (since you hear it faster in one ear and slower in another), it's easier for your brain to handle the input. 

Just my conjecture. I'm obviously not skilled at explaining how I understand it. :) Still learning. 

Edited by Southern Ivy
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I'm reading through some FB threads and it looks like people are saying the background/high frequency filtering is the overall effect of the material and the timing is adjusted by a small *hole* in the filter.

 

Yup, figured that out about the installation.

 

Your Dr. Locke's analysis seems spot on! People on one of the FB groups were asking about the TAPS3. It's half phonological processing, stuff a dyslexic would struggle with. Ok, I'll throw this out for you. With my ds, we kicked butt with intervention, doing LIPS and Barton, blah blah. You drop aggressive work on it for a number of months, and boom he's right back to where he started. Like he hasn't forgotten the rules and he can read, but the actual phonological processing goes right back to crunchy crazy, really rough. I think that's pretty common for a dyslexic profile.

 

So I think you could go ahead with your intervention, see how far she's able to get with LIPS plus the filter (and yes, I would use LIPS), get her reading, and then maybe have a nice normal summer break, fall break, and see what happens, see whether she regresses. Or you may notice it immediately, that even with a week or two off she regresses significantly. That regression will be a big clue. 

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With filtering out background noise. Their is actually no way to separate background noise from other sound.

What can be filtered out, are specific frequency ranges. With higher frequencies the common ones to be filtered.

But this will filter all higher frequencies, not just those in the background.

 

Though 7 to 8 years ago, I conducted some research into 'background noise'. With a group of adults and children with APD.

Where my hypothesis was, that a cause of difficulty with background noise?   

Is the inability to 'localise sound'. To identify where a sound is coming from?

 

That hearing can be focused, in a similar way to vision.  Which enables us to separate background noise, from what we are trying to listen.

I first tested the group, and found that most were unable to point in the direction of a sound. When their eyes were closed.

For the ones that had this difficulty. I had them do some exercises to help develop this ability.

Which improved for the majority of them.

They then did exercises, where they sat with a TV on one side, and a Radio on the other side.

They then practised, shifting the focus of their hearing, from one to the other.

It had people talking on both sides, so that they tried to follow what was being said on one side.  Then to the other side?

Which most of them were able to do, after practising for a while.

 

With the ones that were successful with this.  They then did exercises in noisy environments, such as shopping malls, bars and restaurants.  Where they practised focusing their hearing on someone speaking, in this noisy situation?

Previously, this had been impossible for them.  But with practice, they found that they were able to follow the conversation.  As the background noise, had moved into the background.

 

But Peter Pans above link to the article: 'Effects of phase difference on the binaural perceiving intensity'.

Directly relates to this.  As it shows the practical effect on hearing,  when their is a 'phase time delay' with one ear.

How it effects the ability to localise sound. 

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See I remember you talking about localizing sound, but I don't think I quite understood the rest. Now it makes more sense. I don't suppose you have any data on phase time delay changes in kids who have done the localization work...

 

So basically it's counter-intuitive and we need to take our kids to the mall and eat out and talk with them more...

Edited by PeterPan

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PeterPan, you asked if their is any data on phase time delay changes?

But it wouldn't have any effect on the phase time delay.

Rather, by directly practising sound localisation.  It can help them to develop a way to localise sound, that takes the phase time delay into account. 

 

Though going directly to malls wont help.

It requires a graduated process, beginning with single sounds. Then adding a second sound, and working towards multiple competing sounds.

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Ahh. Is there a way to improve phase time delay? And did these test subjects also have fatigue, headaches, etc. with the noise exposure and with trying to filter voice from background? Did those symptoms improve with the improved ability to localize in the noisy environment? You would think it would, but I wondered if the people had those symptoms and if they improved.

Edited by PeterPan

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That is great news!

 

Once she is hearing better and is used to the filter for a week or so, here are some resources for you.  

 

Why blending is hard, how it works, with pictures, video links:

 

http://www.thephonicspage.org/On%20Reading/blendingwords.html

 

I would focus first on re-learing sounds and blending, teach the sounds in sound order, with help from speech therapist helping you teach them, use this chart, it is in sound order:

 

http://www.thephonicspage.org/On%20Reading/Resources/40LChartsCombined.pdf

 

Then, I would try my syllables program and then go through all of Webster while doing a good phonics program designed for someone with speech/hearing difficulties.  Word Mastery is a good one, it is in order of easiest to blend letters first.  Then, go through all of Webster's Speller 2+ syllable words for reading, just doing a bit of spelling, my students with underlying speech/hearing problems do best with a syllable approach.  You could also try a long vowel first phonics program, either the old 1970's Open Court or the newer School Phonics, it is now OOP but I will see if I can track down a copy.

 

The first part of the old Open Court is online:

 

http://wigowsky.com/school/opencourt/opencourt.htm

 

 

 

 

 

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Just a little update - 

We have received the ear filter and she's doing really well. I've noticed that her What?s and Huh?s are fewer. She's had growth in speech as well - with skills going from 70% accuracy to 90% accuracy. I don't have an update on her alphabet retention as life went crazy after we got back - my dad fell on ice and ended up in the hospital with a subdural hematoma, 2 strokes, and emergency brain surgery! We were gone for 2 1/2 weeks with our schedule in complete upheaval, so little was done then. I'm hoping to see some progress and I'll keep you updated. 

Dr and I chatted today and the ADHD meds my daughter is one are working sometimes, but sometimes not. The dr is referring us to a psychiatrist to assist with the medication aspect. She feels that since we have so many symptoms that overlap with ADHD, SPD, APD, and MERLD, she wants someone who is more familiar with medicating to be at the helm. We just aren't sure what's going on. She also wants to get another evaluation from a neuropsych to see what all we're dealing with and if there are other learning challenges. (It'll be a year in May, so it's time to schedule anyway.) 

Hopefully, we'll get stuff figured out eventually. 

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So sorry about your dad! I hope he recovers well. That sounds very scary. :sad:

 

But  :party:  for your daughter! The ADHD meds can sometimes take awhile to get right. We did a lot of adjusting for DS13 in the beginning.

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You've got some progress for sure!  It takes time with younger kids to figure things out, but it sounds like you are on top of things :) 

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So sorry about your dad! I hope he recovers well. That sounds very scary. :sad:

 

But  :party:  for your daughter! The ADHD meds can sometimes take awhile to get right. We did a lot of adjusting for DS13 in the beginning.

It was terrifying. We nearly lost him on Valentine's Day. He has some cognitive deficits that are slowly healing. I mean, what typical person takes out their own trach and laughs about it?! He's very much a child in many ways, but then today, he asked to go back to work. It's hard and even harder for my mom who is with him, but the doctors are amazed at his progress and say he's doing well. He's currently in a "step-down unit" - the step between ICU and a normal hospital floor. The unit he was transferred to specializes in brain trauma, so he's receiving wonderful care and therapy. We're hopeful he will be home by June.

 

OMG - Meds. 

So, my daughter can't swallow pills, so we've been using chewables. We also have an HSA, so high deductible the beginning of the year, but this is ridiculous...Our copay today for the meds today was $530!!! WTH?! Granted, she was supposed to do 15mg 2x a day, so 5mg and 10mg of chewables...that's a lot of pills, but STILL!! $530!! 

The pharmacist talked to me, then asked the dr to change it to liquid to save me $440. I never thought I'd be excited about a $90 med. haha 

 

The pharmacist told me that he's not even making money on the chewables! Insurance is more corrupt than politics sometimes. 

Sorry - total tangent there. 

 

Anyway, the dr is wondering if we need to give her a 2nd med since it doesnt' always work. I know they layer meds sometimes. But, she's not confident, thus the psychiatrist referral. I can definitely appreciate her concern and admission that she needs someone with more experience to step in. (She's a DO, not a ped, so not as much opportunity for it.)

 

 

You've got some progress for sure!  It takes time with younger kids to figure things out, but it sounds like you are on top of things :)

Yeah, I'm not discouraged or anything. Thanks to all my reading on this board, I've come to realize that it's an ever changing journey and you just have to be ready to jump up and go. 

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Oh no about the cost of the meds!! :crying:  DS13's ADHD meds are over $200 per month, and I thought that was bad. 

 

Have you checked other pharmacies? I've heard they can really vary in price.

 

Since you have to adjust the meds anyway, hopefully they can find you a cheaper option.

 

In the meantime, can you work on the pill swallowing thing? I've read that some people start with swallowing tic tacs since they are tiny and then move on to other things when they ready. DS's ER ADHD meds are a huge pill (doesn't bother him), but his short-acting pill is small. And we have sometimes cut it half for dosage purposes, so it can be made even smaller. You can also get pill crushers and put it in something like yogurt. We had to do that for my other son, when he had to take a certain medication in pill form when he was only one year old. But some meds are not meant to be crushed or cut, so you'd have to check.

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She's 5? We had an article on teaching swallowing pills. We started with Nerds (candy). Worked for us.

 

Maybe time to do genetics.

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Can they just give you a regular tablet and you use a pill crusher? ER meds have special delivery systems, so they don't get crushed. But if it's just a short-acting, then you could get a pill crusher and grind it up and put it on a spoon. That's what we did for years. 

 

Yeah, you start with Nerds and swallowing a single Nerd candy. Once she can do that comfortably, try something a little bigger like a cheerio. Now granted, he was 9, but it didn't take long once we did this. And Nerds are stupid cheap. Practice 3-5 times a day with the Nerds. The issue is motor planning. My ds is still awkward because he doesn't round his mouth correctly when he puts the water in. But he gets it down and doesn't choke, whew. 

Edited by PeterPan

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Wow what a crazy time for you. Wishing you the very best. With the filter she is getting exposed to a whole new world of auditory without you even doing schooling. Turn on music. Have her watch interesting movies. Have her try singing.  

I had read that focalin can be opened and sprinkled in applesauce or whatever the time release  beads still work but that concerta can't . I am not sure anything else that is the full extent of my knowledge there. 

Gosh the thing about evals. Huh they are expensive and can't be done every year right? Some stuff I could have the SLP spot check without a full battery so you could try that and then give her some times with the new filter. I wish your school had better help. Here they can do a full screening and they have a very well established school for kids with needs. Its a good school especially for a state that spends next to no money on education 

 

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Just a note on the meds and not swelling pills.

My DD uses the Dayana patch. Back when it first came out (she was around 12 maybe), her dr let us be his first patient to try out the patch. At 23 she still has food issues and doesn't do well swilling pills. She has chosen to go back to the Daytrana even with the $150 per month copay that she pays herself.

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Oh no about the cost of the meds!! :crying:  DS13's ADHD meds are over $200 per month, and I thought that was bad. 

 

Have you checked other pharmacies? I've heard they can really vary in price.

 

Since you have to adjust the meds anyway, hopefully they can find you a cheaper option.

 

In the meantime, can you work on the pill swallowing thing? I've read that some people start with swallowing tic tacs since they are tiny and then move on to other things when they ready. DS's ER ADHD meds are a huge pill (doesn't bother him), but his short-acting pill is small. And we have sometimes cut it half for dosage purposes, so it can be made even smaller. You can also get pill crushers and put it in something like yogurt. We had to do that for my other son, when he had to take a certain medication in pill form when he was only one year old. But some meds are not meant to be crushed or cut, so you'd have to check.

 

We have a cup that is supposed to help with swallowing and it did nothing. I tried with mini-M&Ms, but she couldn't even swallow those. :/ 

The pharmacy we use is a hometown pharmacy and they really try to get it as low as possible. Usually when I use Good RX, it's one of the cheaper ones. 

The dr ok'd the liquid, which is only $90, so that's no problem. They had to order it, so we're getting it today. 

 

She's 5? We had an article on teaching swallowing pills. We started with Nerds (candy). Worked for us.

 

Maybe time to do genetics.

Genetics? Are you meaning to see which meds work? I've heard conflicting reports on those. Have you done it? 

Someone mentioned that the extra hyperactivity and meds "not working" could be due to a growth spurt. She said her son always has a week or two of the meds not working right when he has a growth spurt, then it evens out again. 

 

Can they just give you a regular tablet and you use a pill crusher? ER meds have special delivery systems, so they don't get crushed. But if it's just a short-acting, then you could get a pill crusher and grind it up and put it on a spoon. That's what we did for years. 

 

Yeah, you start with Nerds and swallowing a single Nerd candy. Once she can do that comfortably, try something a little bigger like a cheerio. Now granted, he was 9, but it didn't take long once we did this. And Nerds are stupid cheap. Practice 3-5 times a day with the Nerds. The issue is motor planning. My ds is still awkward because he doesn't round his mouth correctly when he puts the water in. But he gets it down and doesn't choke, whew. 

She has such a sensitive gag reflex. We tried mixing Straterra into ANYTHING and it was AWFUL. I even tasted the ice cream it was mixed in and I gagged. :( 

 

I may start working with nerds. We had worked with mini-M&Ms, but with no success. 

 

Just a note on the meds and not swelling pills.

My DD uses the Dayana patch. Back when it first came out (she was around 12 maybe), her dr let us be his first patient to try out the patch. At 23 she still has food issues and doesn't do well swilling pills. She has chosen to go back to the Daytrana even with the $150 per month copay that she pays herself.

I haven't heard of that one...but then I'm new to this ADHD ballgame. :D We'll try the liquid, and we'll see what the psychiatrist says once we get an appointment. I'm curious what they will see with her. 

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With the filter she is getting exposed to a whole new world of auditory without you even doing schooling. Turn on music. Have her watch interesting movies. Have her try singing.  

Poor thing is an awful singer. lol She LOVES to sing, though. 

 

I had read that focalin can be opened and sprinkled in applesauce or whatever the time release  beads still work but that concerta can't . I am not sure anything else that is the full extent of my knowledge there. 

 

I have no knowledge either. lol I feel ya. We're getting the liquid, though, so that'll be $440 cheaper. :D 

 

 

Gosh the thing about evals. Huh they are expensive and can't be done every year right? Some stuff I could have the SLP spot check without a full battery ??? so you could try that and then give her some times with the new filter. I wish your school had better help. Here they can do a full screening and they have a very well established school for kids with needs. Its a good school especially for a state that spends next to no money on education.

I've seen how the sped department is run. I have no desire for her to go through that. I mean, I've sat in IEP meetings and they've said "Yeah, your kid can't read, but we don't know why. All our tests show us is that they have struggles." That's no help at all and wastes everyone's time. We have good insurance, so I take advantage of it. :) 

 

I'm no sure what you mean by the SLP spot checking? The SLP did an assessment back in August, so we'll probably have a check once we've completed our "prescribed" year. 

The things I want checked out with the neuropsych are pertaining more to her working memory, visual/spatial development, possible dyslexia (though I know some won't check for that until 7-8), etc. - things left unanswered last May. 

 

 

 

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Well the SLP tests receptive and expressive language. So work on that like crazy now that she has the filter.  You could try the trial version of hearbuilder if headphones go over the filter. It is very age appropriate for her and works on phonics, sequencing, auditory memory and it is cheap as programs go. This would really let you know where her strengths are. you could just split the headphones so you both have a pair and coach and encourage her. That will give you a good idea plus train her brain with that new filter. 

 

Also look into Razkids in a few months. They have books that you read but it is also read to them. That is good training. 

 

 

I wrote prolific notes when my son had his IQ test but he had some auxillary tests to figure out what else might be going on. 

The working memory that the neuropsych tests is basically digit span, and the other one is recall all the breakfast foods or animals in a zoo that kind of stuff.  There was a hearing a conversation in a noisy environment. My son bonked that as well. Then for visual memory there was a seeing a card and remembering it kind of like the traditional memory cards game. I remember for visual processing there was a tanagram like game and one where he scanned a list of pictures and named them as fast as he could on a timed list. So elephent, horse, cat, frog.  I was told an accurate IQ was best once they are reading so chicken and the egg...uhg

 

you might want to consider using a reading program, hearbuilder and the therapy you have now and giving it say 6 months to get that filter rewiring her brain before getting more testing because it is just a snapshot in time and it would probably be better to get an accurate snapshot once some of these interventions have a chance to integrate. I have this same problem as my son is required to get tested right on his birthday but the intervention program goes for 3 months after. If I could get him tested after the program it would be far more accurate IMO.

 

Also work on fine motor for atleast an hour a day because this is the age where that really develops. Do big motor and small motor exercises. puzzles, tic tack toe, dot to dot, mazes. 

 

Your situation is a little different because your child is young and there is very very good data for early intervention. If the updated testing is going to get you more intensive intervention then yes go for it. The interventions get more challenging as kids get older. My son is nearing 11 and is far less cooperative than when he was younger. 

Edited by exercise_guru
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She actually uses Hear Builder in speech therapy. They're starting her from the beginning to build her auditory skills - currently working on word vs syllable identification. I talked to the SLP about doing it at home, but I think we're going to wait to see how she does with just doing it at speech. 
Just trying to figure out which reading program to get now. :)

 

 

 

 

Peter Pan - awhile back you said you didn't trust the 1 retained reflexes thing. Just thought I'd let you know that she actually has 2, so you were right. She has STNR and ATNR. The new OT said that the STNR is subtle, but there. The ATNR is more pronounced. 

 

Edited by Southern Ivy
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Well if she likes the program and makes progress do see if they will train you and let you two do it at home because then the time in therapy can be better used. My son does Hearbuilder for 30 minutes  a day and it takes a lot of time to build progress. Its the perfect therapy to do at home because we sit with two sets of headphones and I coach and encourage him.  I also really really like fast forword and I really like a program called Skyscraper by accoustic pioneer for the ipad. 

 

Now that you know about the CAPD I would consider LIPS to make sure she is getting all the base sounds. Also use a lot of visual aids because even though I am talking right at my son that doesn't mean it is processing and he learned to fake it so people wouldn't think he was stupid.  Since diagnosis I am now going back and making sure the sound is really getting in and being processed, 

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Well if she likes the program and makes progress do see if they will train you and let you two do it at home because then the time in therapy can be better used. My son does Hearbuilder for 30 minutes  a day and it takes a lot of time to build progress. Its the perfect therapy to do at home because we sit with two sets of headphones and I coach and encourage him.  I also really really like fast forword and I really like a program called Skyscraper by accoustic pioneer for the ipad. 

 

Now that you know about the CAPD I would consider LIPS to make sure she is getting all the base sounds. Also use a lot of visual aids because even though I am talking right at my son that doesn't mean it is processing and he learned to fake it so people wouldn't think he was stupid.  Since diagnosis I am now going back and making sure the sound is really getting in and being processed, 

She's made some pretty big gains just in the last 2 weeks, so we're waiting to see how much she gains in the next month. They're tracking her progress in Hear Builder, so we'll be able to see pretty clearly if she's gaining or staying stagnant. If there's minimal growth, I'll definitely download it. We're working on similar things at home, but if we see that she needs to be increased, we'll do it. 

 

We're definitely looking into LiPS and the owner is waiting on a reply from a friend about Foundations in Sounds. The people I've encountered on FB who have done FiS have seen great improvement, like with LiPS. However, FiS is about $150 cheaper and is supposed to be a bit easier to use at home. (I have no doubt I can do LiPS, but if they're comparable, I do like to save money where I can.) 

Edited by Southern Ivy

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Are you watching ebay? You can do a search and then *save* it so that you get an email, boom, when new listings for that appear.

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Are you watching ebay? You can do a search and then *save* it so that you get an email, boom, when new listings for that appear.

I didn't even consider LiPS would be on ebay! 

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