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Online high school for someone who is behind?


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What is the reason you are wanting to go with online classes? (I typically think of students who are significantly behind as benefiting more from one-on-one instruction, especially if he is several grades behind in math, and I'm guessing reading/writing might be some of those other subjects?)

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If K12 has a online public charter available near to you, it might be worth it as a stop gap solution. They have non honors classes that a friend’s high school daughter who was behind was able to cope with enough to get Bs and Cs. Could she be redshirted in 8th grade instead so that she has a less taxing load while recovering?

 

What is the reason you are wanting to go with online classes?

divorce, maybe in case her husband insist on public school http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/topic/666484-divorce-folks-i-need-your-help/
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IMO "Online" courses are harder than the same course in a Brick and Mortar school. That is especially true if the "Online" courses are Asynchronous.  It is better to be the oldest kid in the class and not the youngest kid in the class. The most important thing is not to promote because of age. Your child needs to be solid in Math, English, Science, etc., before beginning High School. In High School, everything counts.   I don't have a solution to how that can be done quickly and wish your child much good health in the future.

 

If your child is highly motivated, a school like TTU K12 (formerly TTUISD) offers Middle School courses (my DD began with them with 6th grade courses), and could "catch up" if things went extremely well, but that would require a great deal of Time Management and Self Discipline on the part of the student and it would be very tough to catch up quickly IMO.  There are other schools that offer Middle School courses "Online", but far fewer than schools that offer "Online" High School courses.

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IMO "Online" courses are harder than the same course in a Brick and Mortar school. That is especially true if the "Online" courses are Asynchronous. It is better to be the oldest kid in the class and not the youngest kid in the class. The most important thing is not to promote because of age. Your child needs to be solid in Math, English, Science, etc., before beginning High School. In High School, everything counts. I don't have a solution to how that can be done quickly and wish your child much good health in the future.

 

If your child is highly motivated, a school like TTU K12 (formerly TTUISD) offers Middle School courses (my DD began with them with 6th grade courses), and could "catch up" if things went extremely well, but that would require a great deal of Time Management and Self Discipline on the part of the student and it would be very tough to catch up quickly IMO. There are other schools that offer Middle School courses "Online", but far fewer than schools that offer "Online" High School courses.

Larry we'd be great friends IRL since I agree withv most of what you post! Lol!

 

Totally agree that asynchronous online classes require discipline and organization well beyond what is needed for a live class. I get age, but what's the rush? If they're 2-3 years behind, then work through summers and graduate a year later. Or, work diligently now and dual enroll later (which is like double time).

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I am afraid of getting public school involved at all and being accused of neglect. K-12 is public school too...

If K12 has a online public charter available near to you, it might be worth it as a stop gap solution. They have non honors classes that a friend’s high school daughter who was behind was able to cope with enough to get Bs and Cs. Could she be redshirted in 8th grade instead so that she has a less taxing load while recovering?

 

divorce, maybe in case her husband insist on public school http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/topic/666484-divorce-folks-i-need-your-help/

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I am afraid of getting public school involved at all and being accused of neglect. K-12 is public school too...

Understood. A divorced friend had to choose public school at home for her daughter to avoid a fight with her ex.

What budget are you looking at because private choices unfortunately cost more? Secular or doesn't matter?

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Secular is very much preferred. We are barely doing three subjects per day now (our style for grammar school was to combine as much as possible) so this transition will be very hard.

 

If I do enroll them in K12 and they are behind, will they then come back with "your kids were being neglected" and it cause problems?

Edited by Joyce Gripe
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Secular is very much preferred. We are barely doing three subjects per day now (our style for grammar school was to combine as much as possible) so this transition will be very hard.

Workload would be higher than three subjects per day for 8th/9th grade unfortunately because they do whatever subjects is required by public school kids in your state (e.g. for 8th grade: Math, LA, History, Art, Music, Science). When my kids were with K12, they were lenient for k-8th subjects (more leeway to catch up and less particular about work samples, meeting with teacher was once a quarter at a library or Starbucks) but strict for 9th-12th subjects daily assignments because of high school credit. They did give my friend’s high school kid chances to make up for not handing in assignments on time so she won’t fail the course.

 

If I do enroll them in K12 and they are behind, will they then come back with "your kids were being neglected" and it cause problems?

I only have experience with how my region (a few counties) run it and they do want the students to be able to pass the annual state test. No problems with redshirting which was why I suggested that if you think an extra year would be beneficial. My friend’s kid has medical (hearing loss and anxiety/depression) issues and they just work round it. I don’t know any who were accused of neglect for having kids behind academically since many kids transfer from brick and mortar school because of not being able to cope in crowded classrooms and/or bullying issues. They would ask if your child has an existing IEP or 504.

 

Language Arts placement test https://eprcontent.k12.com/placement/placement/placement_langarts_2.html

Math placement test, could not find the 6th grade one, this one is for being ready for their prealgebra (need to get 32 correct) https://eprcontent.k12.com/placement/placement/pdfs/math_12.pdf

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I think the student this thread is about could possibly cram Middle School into one year or 18 months, if willing and able to work on it many hours a day. I believe it is more important the student have a solid foundation, before beginning High School, where everything counts. Going into High School unprepared will lead to poor results and that is not the desired outcome.

 

From threads I have read over the past few years, many of those free, paid for by the state, online schools are very demanding of the students time and productivity and might be worse for this student than attending a brick and mortar public school, which may not be an option.

 

There are also some Private schools, I think some people here have DC in American School and there is Penn Foster, where one can get a High School Diploma that is accredited, inexpensively, and it is less demanding.  Possibly this is the link:

https://www.americanschoolofcorr.com/whychoose/

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So I guess my personal choice here would be to go with something where she could do individually paced math/english (if behind there) and very, very light git-r-done classes in the rest. It's most important to get caught up in the core classes; a student who can read, understand what they read, write a coherent paragraph, and do algebra and geometry can do just fine in college (they would be in lower-level classes, but probably not developmental). 

 

I would work on math twice a day if possible, but two shorter sessions (like, 40 minutes), widely separated; once for learning, once for practice/review. I think this is much better than one long period as the brain tends to get overloaded. I would also work through the summer if at all possible. 

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I like Lanny's suggestion. Why not just work really hard and math and reading/writing for a year to get up closer to age level. The content of science and social studies can be learned once the math and reading/writhing is up to level.

 

At the online charter school where I work, we would not report you for being neglectful for a situation like this (even though some teachers may think it); however, we also would not allow a student to be enrolled that far off age cohort.

Edited by City Mouse
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She is a brilliant writer. Hasn't learned to diagram sentences or write form letters but other than that is not behind in english. Just math and just not being used to structured school in general especially for content subjects

 

If she is a very good writer, I would personally not bother with diagramming sentences, as you need to pare down the work in order to catch up.

 

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Www.acellus.com might work well. There is a tutoring version and a homeschool version (different websites off the Acellus one). 6 courses at once for $10 a month, self paced. Homeschool mode you must go in order from start to finish (can redo assignments). Tutoring is the same classes but you can skip stuff they already know.

 

Not the most rigorous education out there but might be s good fit for your situation.

 

Sent from my SM-G903W using Tapatalk

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I think that sounds a lot better. I also don't think the situation is as dire as it seemed from your first posts; many PS students are behind in math only, and far behind in that. If she is a brilliant writer and can read and understand, all she really needs is some self-paced math to get caught up. Tutoring sounds ideal. 

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My son is 10 and his main problem is handwriting... any suggestions for that?

 

I used Handwriting Without Tears with my older boy.  They have a book that is aimed at older children - the cursive is not very fancy but it worked for him (he had motor skills delays):

 

Cursive Success might be a good place to start, or Can Do Cursive.  They also have a Can Do Printing.

 

https://shopping.lwtears.com/category/products-by-type

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Can you get documentation for illnesses and learning disabilities, from a doctor or therapist? Yes, she needs to be enrolled somewhere and catch up as she is able, but it might take some pressure off of both of you to have a record of what she's been through. (Medically and academically.)

 

A child can't just hurry up and close a gap, especially after trauma and while living in a stressful home situation. Better to get some truth down on paper, along with a very workable plan, and then diligently try to follow the plan. Also, document that you are following it.

 

Community resources might include credit recovery or GED programs through public school, tutoring (check with public libraries or with high school guidance counselors), and the family doctor. I would want to get some help from the school, but that's just me...in my area, the schools are poor, there are serious issues, but the place they excel is helping teens at risk to NOT fall through the cracks. You might have a similar option.

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Can you get documentation for illnesses and learning disabilities, from a doctor or therapist? Yes, she needs to be enrolled somewhere and catch up as she is able, but it might take some pressure off of both of you to have a record of what she's been through. (Medically and academically.)

 

A child can't just hurry up and close a gap, especially after trauma and while living in a stressful home situation. Better to get some truth down on paper, along with a very workable plan, and then diligently try to follow the plan. Also, document that you are following it.

 

 

I mean... this would be great. I dont trust the system to help. I trust them to blame me and take my kids from me.

 

And to not believe her an push her too hard. It's common with crohns disease.

Edited by Joyce Gripe
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I mean... this would be great. I dont trust the system to help. I trust them to blame me and take my kids from me.

 

And to not believe her an push her too hard. It's common with crohns disease.

I haven't read the other post, so please forgive me if my comments are unhelpful.

 

Please get her illness documented and keep your homeschool docs in order, too.

 

As you know, Crohns flares up with stress, so keep that in mind with your catch-up plan. My son struggles with depression and sleeping issues, as well as digestion (resulting from stress from dealing w/sister and DFCS), and is trying to catch-up in math and just keep up with an average schedule.

He's used Tabletclass math since it's asynchronous.

This spring, he'll do an Alg "solidifying concepts" class.

He's graduating a year later. That's ok. He's ok with it, too.

 

Due to the trauma our family has and is continuing to experience, his ability to cope and exercise time management has been affected. Keep that in mind for her as well.

 

You've received good advice, she'll be able to do it. Especially, the two math lessons a day, 30-45 min. max. each.

 

You can work on diagramming later.

 

I agree with your gut feeling to avoid K12 programs (anything connected with the government).

 

Also, you are absolutely correct to keep in mind that CPS is not to be trusted. They will twist your words, too. They will lie. They will try to get you to let your guard down. Be strong.

I'm fighting them currently with a daughter who has several documented mental illnesses, but I'm the problem, not her, in their eyes.

 

Don't let her know your concerns about CPS. It will just stress her out and cause fear. Know first hand.

 

My heart goes out to you.

Edited by historymatters
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Do you live somewhere that is very hostile to homeschooling? I'm wondering if you are catastrophizing reaching out for help for your child. Our state homeschool association has a warm and friendly question and answer service that might put in perspective how likely it would be that a kid with medical issues would be taken from the home for falling behind in school. I know my own state priorities little kids. Things have to be extremely bad for a teen to be taken from the home.

 

You probably need to make a decision about your goals for this child. On the one hand you can use resources like Walch Power Basics which teach high school subjects with text at lower reading levels. On the other had, you could set aside everything except reading and math, get fundamental skills in place, then do a typical high school college prep curriculum.

 

One approach prioritized finishing on time, one is a more slow and steady approach. Because your child is older, he also needs to be on board with whatever the final decision is.

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I haven't read the other post, so please forgive me if my comments are unhelpful.

 

Please get her illness documented and keep your homeschool docs in order, too.

 

As you know, Crohns flares up with stress, so keep that in mind with your catch-up plan. My son struggles with depression and sleeping issues, as well as digestion (resulting from stress from dealing w/sister and DFCS), and is trying to catch-up in math and just keep up with an average schedule.

He's used Tabletclass math since it's asynchronous.

This spring, he'll do an Alg "solidifying concepts" class.

He's graduating a year later. That's ok. He's ok with it, too.

 

Due to the trauma our family has and is continuing to experience, his ability to cope and exercise time management has been affected. Keep that in mind for her as well.

 

You've received good advice, she'll be able to do it. Especially, the two math lessons a day, 30-45 min. max. each.

 

You can work on diagramming later.

 

I agree with your gut feeling to avoid K12 programs (anything connected with the government).

 

Also, you are absolutely correct to keep in mind that CPS is not to be trusted. They will twist your words, too. They will lie. They will try to get you to let your guard down. Be strong.

I'm fighting them currently with a daughter who has several documented mental illnesses, but I'm the problem, not her, in their eyes.

 

Don't let her know your concerns about CPS. It will just stress her out and cause fear. Know first hand.

 

My heart goes out to you.

 

:iagree:    I've seen this as a person working in the system. People who have never witnessed the destruction of bureaucrats on a power trip just.don't.get.it. You've gotten some good tips about things to do outside the public school system; if it were me, I'd stick with those.

 

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She is a brilliant writer. Hasn't learned to diagram sentences or write form letters but other than that is not behind in english. Just math and just not being used to structured school in general especially for content subjects

 

We did content subjects in a very different way than the majority of schools, and both of my kids segued into dual enrollment for college composition, foreign language, and other classes with no problem in 11th-grade. It's not difficult to go, okay, I've always done it this way, but this teacher wants it done that way. They have syllabi and you know what is expected of you. I wouldn't worry about concentrating on structured school, personally. 

 

I haven't read the thread so my suggestion may not fit what has already been discussed but Aleks is online and good IMO. 

 

I was going to suggest Aleks also. It's not going to go as deep or conceptual as some programs, but then again the same can be said for many textbooks. We used it for most of one year when youngest had a difficult schedule (lots of driving) combined with no interest in the deeper concepts, lol. If your dd likes it, I would certainly use it to get caught up. It's great because they can choose from a list of topics to work on each day, that the program has deemed them ready to learn. My dd liked that better than having to go in order in a text.

 

 Yes, she needs to be enrolled somewhere  

 

 

I don't at all think she needs to be enrolled somewhere. Certainly it's a choice that can work, but not the only one that will. My district has credit recovery and other services for kids who are behind and/or at-risk as well.  They have one main goal in mind: get this kid graduated. An admirable goal, but, for the most part, it does not lead to interesting classes or college preparation. And, while I know there are plenty of fantastic kids in the program, our alternative schools and credit recovery programs feature a pretty rough crowd, one I wouldn't put a kid in unless they were pretty street-savvy, and not recovering/suffering from an illness. If the OP wants to school her at home, I definitely think it can be done, probably more easily than using the school system or even online classes. 

 

OP, this is what I would try if it were me: 

 

Math - try ALEKS and see if it will work well for catching up. If that doesn't work, I would look for a math program that lets you test out of lessons. I know Saxon fits the bill for that, not sure what else might. A tutor could be good, but you'd have to find one that felt comfortable choosing needed topics on her own, and not just working through books (more time-consuming, so I wouldn't pay for a tutor when using a text unless she starts struggling). Once she is ready for algebra, you can reassess. We would personally lose our minds if we did math twice a day, I would go later and start earlier in the year rather than do that. We have always started school the first Monday of August and we have always had subjects to finish up in June, lol. 

 

History and literature - we correlate these at my house. Do you enjoy reading together? If so, you might try reading and discussing together, with very limited and carefully chosen written assignments. Many assignments are meant to check understanding and comprehension, and you're doing that as you along if you read and discuss together. Of course we could read more rapidly on our own, but we find it works really well to read and discuss as we go. We don't have to plan a separate time for it or sync our reading, and we don't forget half of what occurred to us while reading. 

 

You could use SWB's series for history, which would give the option of listening to the audiobooks sometimes, then just pick literature selections. Or one text I really like is Humanistic Traditions, which has 6 volumes from ancients to modern. I love that it covers music, art, and literature as well. It makes literature very simple; for some works where I just want exposure, we can read the excerpt in the book. For others, we skip the excerpt and read the work separately. You can very easily create an art appreciation credit as well by adding some additional reading (suggestions in text), trips to the museum, recorded and live performances. 

 

Science - if she is able to handle a high school text, skip directly to that, no need to 'catch up.' I would look for a straight forward text, but I wouldn't jump to something like Power Basics unless truly needed. One, they are really boring imo, and two, they are widely known as being with struggling learners and in special education classrooms. There is nothing wrong with being a struggling learner or using the materials as needed, and I know people on this board have used them and had no trouble with college admissions, but I personally would prefer to have something more mainstream on the transcript if possible. 

 

Foreign language - you can go two ways with this. If it is likely that her health issues will remain under control, you could skip this for now and concentrate on other subjects. Or, if it's more uncertain or she would just like to move more slowly, you can start now and move at half-speed, which gets you through at two full years. 

 

If she graduates at 18, this would give her 3-4 credits in both history and literature, 1 fine arts elective, probably 3 credits of math and science, and 2 in foreign language. I would look at some interest-led electives to pump it up a bit. Or possibly dual enrollment junior and senior year, that would increase credits and give some validation (particularly if she doesn't do well on standardized tests). If health or distance is an issue, she might be able to do a few classes online DE. 

 

Best of luck to you both as you ponder your choices!

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Do you live somewhere that is very hostile to homeschooling? I'm wondering if you are catastrophizing reaching out for help for your child. Our state homeschool association has a warm and friendly question and answer service that might put in perspective how likely it would be that a kid with medical issues would be taken from the home for falling behind in school. I know my own state priorities little kids. Things have to be extremely bad for a teen to be taken from the home.

Your claim that she is "catastrophizing," is insulting, especially to those of us who have had their children ripped from our custody, with the help of "therapists" who were supposed to help our child and family get better, not collude to tear our family apart.   

 

You accused her of: "an irrational thought a lot of us have in believing that something is far worse than it actually is" (psych central). Just because it hasn't happened to you or to anyone you know (presuming here) doesn't mean she's being irrational, because it's a real possibility. Thank God you haven't had to go through this pain. And with this crazy family in California, all the "do-gooders" out there feel it's their duty to come in on a white horse and save the children.  :cursing:   :glare: 

 

The state could be a generally good state to homeschool in, but then you get down to counties and individuals. There's the distinction.

Also, no, things don't have to be extremely bad for them to remove a child, no matter the age.That's a myth. One mandatory reporter, who has a bias against homeschooling and is the child's doctor or therapist, is compelled to report what they "think" is abuse, a failure on the part of the mother (neglect).

 

Then, that report goes to the county Dept of Family and Children Services (in our state, CPS in others). From there, there's an intrinsic bias against homeschooling and parental rights, in general. And you can't sue DFCS/CPS, which is also unfortunate. Families have to dish-out thousands of dollars in attorney's fees to fight them; those who don't have the money are run-over like a steamroller.

 

These case workers firmly believe in the system and the superiority of the state to raise children over the family. One of my conversations was such that one investigator was amazed that I, a parent, thought that I knew more about my child than the therapists she was seeing. She disagreed because they "had degrees."  :huh:

There are a few individual exceptions within the system, I've met those, too, in a different county, but they still won't speak against "the system " as a whole.

 

The OP should not be paranoid, but realistic. Part of being realistic is knowing that, a 'mandatory reporter' will make subjective decisions and you won't even know what happened until you get a phone call or visit by DFCS/CPS.  If I had been realistic about how underhanded they can be, maybe I would still have my child in custody and not be in court, because I would've made different decisions about her healthcare.  :crying:

 

The OP is reaching out to get help for her child and should not be accused of being irrational. She is rightly concerned and is requesting the best direction to go to do what's best for her child, while keeping out of the radar of the state and those who report for them. For ex: tutors within the homeschooling world, not tutors connected to the government school, might be helpful (I think recommended, already, just wanted to make the distinction).

 

Considering there's been stress and trauma in her child's life, which leads to her Crohns becoming inflamed, which leads to studies falling behind, a therapist is a possibility to help her manage those stressful feelings and thoughts. So, finding one who is for parental rights and has a positive view of homeschooling, will make all the difference in the world. If the OP is religious, there needs to be one who doesn't have a bias against that, as well (again, speaking from experience). 

 

OP: are you a member of HSLDA? If not, I recommend it, immediately. There might be a list of therapists who are suitable to the criteria I mentioned above.

 

Edited by historymatters
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Another option for math might be Lial's Basic College Algebra. Despite the title, it's a remediation book that covers all of the basics needed to be ready for algebra, and then some basic algebra. 

 

Perhaps someone who has used it can chime in and say whether it's easy to test out of certain chapters/topics. 

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Dear historymatters,

 

If your therapist reported your family to CPS and your children were taken away, I am truly sorry that that happened to you.

 

My own life experience is different. I have helped with the homeschooling special needs community in my state and seen parents who know that they need help refuse to seek it out of fear, and the children can suffer for it. For example, the parent who does not have insurance that covers speech therapy refusing to use the public school speech therapist that would be free for fear of her child's developmental delay being blamed on bad parenting. Many parents are nervous the first time they are covered by the state homeschool test law because their children are behind. Working with them to understand what the law actually says can calm that fear.

 

I did not say that OP was catastrophizing. I was asking OP to talk to someone local who is knowledgeable, to see if her fears are indeed rational. There may be specific tutors or other help that is particularly homeschool-friendly that she could be referred to outside the public school system as well. Again, my state homeschool association has a wonderful help person who is warm and reassuring. We are lucky. I don't know OP's own situation.

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This link has a list of online high schools. You would need to research individually, it it’s a good place to start.

 

https://www.bestcollegereviews.org/top/online-high-schools/

 

If you daughter writes well, then math is your primary problem to be high school ready. I would get a prealgebra text right now (Math Mammoth maybe) and spend every single day working through it with her until the start of her 9th grade. If you do nothing, just work through prealgebra and have her read across subjects. You can absolutely get her ready for Algebra 1 in 9th grade and then jump into an online school of your choosing.

Good luck!

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I have not read the replies but can you continue to homeschool and try to catch her up yourself without enrolling online?  Maybe this isn't an option.

 

My DS has Crohn's disease and throwing him in "to hope he'll catch up" didn't work for him at all.  It stressed him and made his crohn's worse.  I am sorry you are going through this.  Decisions for schooling around a kid who is sick and behind are so tough.  For us, it was always math that was hard too.  I don't know why, but when he was sickest he just couldn't focus on math, while other subjects were fine.  

 

 

ETA -  :grouphug:   What is hardest about Crohn's is that the combination of small, behind in growth, sickly child and behind in school too can look bad to those who don't understand the disease.  

Edited by Attolia
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I wanted to suggest some additional resources for online education, and to offer support for delaying the 15 yo child for a year if that seems sensible OR give her a 13th year of school.  Our current umbrella school (HomeLife Academy) offers the option of a fifth year of high school, and taking this option has not had a negative impact on the children's college entrance. 

 

Khan Academy seems a very good option for bringing math up to speed at the child's pace -- no pressure, but she can go as fast as she'd like. 

Here is a link to Khan Academy's starting advice for homeschoolers; this is just Khan Academy itself.  This might be appropriate for all of the children. 

 

Or themathpage.com (recommended on the Ambleside Online emergency resource page, which I link a bit further down). 

 

Especially since you have a good reader & writer, the resources at Ambleside Online offer one way to teach using largely electronic resources.  You could just use a booklist you like, or the books in a subject you like.  AO has a specific goal of making a high-quality education available at the lowest possible cost, so the curriculum is available for free and they try to find free or inexpensive options for resources.  The organizers are Christian, very inclusive and ecumenical, and the resources reflect a variety of worldviews. 

 

I am also linking you to Ambleside Online's Emergency Homeschooling Plan.  In addition to math ideas for all levels, there is history, science, art, geography, and music study; and the Language Arts section there includes some handwriting resources that may be helpful for your son. 

 

:grouphug:  to you, friend! 

 

ETA: if you would like help beginning to make a transcript or in any way have concerns about the record-keeping aspect of this all, do let us know; that isn't my area of knowledge, but many on the forum can offer practical assistance with this. 

 

 

Edited by serendipitous journey
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