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Book a Week 2018 - BW5: Brit Tripping


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Happy Sunday and welcome to week five in our Open Roads Reading Adventure. Greetings to all our readers and to all following our progress.  Mister Linky is available weekly on 52 Books in 52 Weeks  to share a link to your book reviews.

 

Next week, the Great Mysterious British road trip will begin and and will affectionately be called Brit Tripping from here on.  The trip is hosted by Sandy and Amy and they are here to tell you all about the rules, the ranks, trips, and the schedule.

 

*******

 

This year we’ll be following the Roman roads through England with the intent of reading a book from each of the 45 counties with a few extra trips to London. At the beginning of the week we’ll check in with our route and we’ll post what we’ve read. Pack your bags and kindles and audiobooks and get ready to Brit Trip!

 

One of the challenges we discovered in planning was that the counties change frequently and in many places overlap with other counties and then there’s some disagreement on what is and isn’t a county.

 

Here’s an interesting article on the confusion of English counties!

 

 

General rules:

 

·         Join in for as much as you want. This is supposed to be fun.

·         Let us know if you are in so we know who we are caravanning with!

·         Rereads are allowed.

·         No page number minimum.

·         Please follow us on Goodreads. We’ll be shelving our Brit Tripping reads on their own shelf. To see what counties are included you need to go MumtoTwo’s page and click on SETTINGS next to the search box and check the box for RECOMMENDER. Then at the bottom of the beige box click on CLOSE.

·         Send Amy a PM and she will email you a printable copy of our itinerary to keep track of our trips and books.

·         If you would like to receive postcards please send your address to Robin.

·         Our expected itinerary will be posted every Sunday in Robin’s weekly post.

·         The itinerary for the year is posted on Robin’s 52 Books Blog.

 

 

Join a bus:

 

  • The Detectives (Mystery reading)
  • The Rebels (Mixed genre reading)

 

All those who joined us for our adventures will earn a rank based on number of counties completed.

 

27073136_1832125793464797_48265315697013

 

And the final level is The Bertram Wooster. That is earned by reading one book set in England of any genre but failing spectacularly at all other challenges. A good attitude must be maintained despite numerous hardships. Employing a Gentleman’s Gentleman is optional but encouraged. Bonus points awarded if you are accidentally engaged multiple times during the year.

 

 

Schedule:

 

 

Ermine Street

  • 2/04 - London (Scotland Yard)
  • 2/11 – Cambridgeshire
  • 2/18 – Huntingdonshire
  • 2/25 – Bedfordshire
  • 3/04 – Northampton shire and Rutland
  • 3/11 - Nottinghamshire
  • 3/18 - East and West Riding of Yorkshire
  • 3/25 – York

 

Dere Street

  • 4/01 – North Yorkshire
  • 4/08 – Durham
  • 4/15 – Tyne and Wear
  • 4/22 – Northumbria

 

Ichnield Way

  • 4/29 – Isle of Wight
  • 5/06 – Dorset
  • 5/13 – Hampshire
  • 5/20 – Berkshire
  • 5/27 – Buckinghamshire
  • 6/03 – Herefordshire
  • 6/10 – Essex
  • 6/17 – Suffolk
  • 6/24 - Norfolk

 

Fosse Way

  • 7/01 – Cornwall
  • 7/08 – Devon
  • 7/15 – Dorset
  • 7/22 – Gloucestershire
  • 7/29 – Derbyshire
  • 8/12 – Lincolnshire

 

Akemam Street

  • 8/19 – London
  • 8/26 – Oxfordshire
  • 9/02 – Wiltshire
  • 9/09 – Somerset

 

Watling Way

  • 09/16 – Kent
  • 09/23 – Sussex
  • 09/30 – Surrey
  • 10/07 – Spooky London
  • 10/14 – Worcestershire
  • 10/21 – Warwickshire
  • 10/28 – West Midlands
  • 11/04 – Staffordshire
  • 11/11 – Shropshire
  • 11/18 – Cheshire
  • 11/25 – Merseyside
  • 12/02 – Manchester
  • 12/09 – Lancashire
  • 12/16 – Cumbria

 

Christmas in London

 

We hope you enjoy traveling around England with us!

 

Love – Sandy (Mumto2)  and Amy (Aggieamy)

 

******************************************

 

What are you reading this week?

 

 

 

Link to week four

 

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Hi everybody!    I'd love to do some Brit Tripping so will climb aboard the Rebels bus. :).  I'll be pm'ing Amy for the printable guide, too.  :driving:   I finished Code Name Verity by Elizabeth

I started my job volunteering at the library. It was wonderful! The children's librarian had songs, dances, and books. I just needed to help pass out materials and be the hype person for the kids. I l

Oh, Brit Tripping sounds fun! My reading has been rather...lackluster as of late and this might just be a good chance to liven things up a little! Our library system joined a larger library system whi

I am currently reading A Soldier of the Great War by Mark Helprin.  Finished new to me author Gene Doucette's paranormal series, The Immortal last night.

 

“I don’t know how old I am.My earliest memory is something along the lines of fire good, ice bad, so I think I predate written history, but I don’t know by how much. I like to brag that I’ve been there from the beginning, and while this may very well be true, I generally just say it to pick up girls.†--Adam the Immortal

Surviving sixty thousand years takes cunning and more than a little luck. But in the twenty-first century, Adam confronts new dangers—someone has found out what he is, a demon is after him, and he has run out of places to hide.Worst of all, he has had entirely too much to drink.

Immortal is a first person confessional penned by a man who is immortal, but not invincible. In an artful blending of sci-fi, adventure, fantasy, and humor, IMMORTAL introduces us to a world with vampires, demons and other “magical†creatures, yet a world without actual magic.

 

 

 

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Hello long lost friends! Life has been a whirlwind for a few years but settling down now. My goal for this year is to just open a book. I finished Midwifes Confession. Working on The hand maids tale, the book thief (a reread for me) and book 12 of the women's murder club.

Speaking of children's books we loved as kids, I loved the babysitters club books. Loved them

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Perusing my shelves and have several England mysteries to choose from as we travel through London next week

 

Daughter of Time  - Josephine Tey  (Scotland yard art history)

Devlin Diary -  Christie Phillips  (London England 1600/2000)

Girl on the Train - Paula Hawkins (2013 London mystery)

I found You - Lisa Jewel (England mystery- London and Ridinghouse Bay)

Secret Keeper - Kate Morton (London)

Sherlockian - Graham Moore (1893/2010 England)

 

The Sherlockian has been sitting on my dusty shelves for the longest so may begin with it. 

 

 

 

 

Agatha Christie's Death on the Nile is $2.99 on Kindle today!   20th Century Fox working on the movie now

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I read If This is a Man/The Truce - 3 Stars - This is a powerful story of Primo Levi who was imprisoned in Auschwitz. I’m giving it 3 stars, since I felt that his writing style was confusing and tedious.

 

I believe that this is the first holocaust account that I have read that has been written from an objective, rather detached and unemotional point of view, or at least the first that I can remember. I know that if I had gone through all those horrors, there is no way in God’s green earth that I could have felt the same way. No way.

 

Some of my favorite quotes:

 

"One of the most important things I had learnt in Auschwitz was that one must always avoid being a nobody. All roads are closed to a person who appears to be useless, all are open to a person who has a function, even the most fatuous."

 

“I am constantly amazed by man's inhumanity to man.â€

 

and The Rage and the Pride - 5 Stars - When I started reading this book, I did not realize that the author, Oriana Fallaci, died over a decade ago. In fact, I didn’t know much about her at all. She definitely had a unique style and lived through some turbulent times. As a teenager in Italy, she had fought Mussolini’s fascist regime. Then later as a war reporter, she covered major conflicts throughout the world. She was probably the only Western journalist to have interviewed Ayatollah Khomeini twice. She called the chador, “a stupid, medieval ragâ€.

 

Fallaci spent her last years between her native Tuscany and New York City. The U.S. was her adopted homeland and she loved it dearly. She wrote this book after the horrific 9/11 attacks, while living in Manhattan. In true Italian anger and passion, she lashed out at everyone that she felt was responsible in even the most minor ways – from Islamic fundamentalists all the way to those that she refers to as the “cicadas†– the politically correct elite. This was entertaining to read. Her rage was not only with regards to 9/11, but also what she could see happening to her native Italy and throughout Europe. She was not one to spare words or feelings. She just let it run. No political correctness for her!

 

One of my favorite parts is when she refers to historic landmarks throughout the world – the Statue of Liberty, Big Ben, Notre Dame, and so on, but then she reminds the reader that as an Italian, she worries about the Sistine Chapel, St. Peter’s Dome, and and on and on. swears that if the terrorists destroy Italy’s landmarks:

“I swear. It is I who would become the holy warrior. … War you wanted? War you want? Good. As far as I am concerned, war is war and war will be. Until the last breath.â€

 

Naturally, she made many enemies from the time that this book was published until the few short years when she died. I believe that she would be devastated by all that has been happening in Europe, her beloved United States, and her native Italy. 

 

This is not really a book per se. The author intended it be a sermon, a wake-up call. Do not read it if you are easily offended. Otherwise, I wish that everyone would read this thought-provoking and important work. These are things that need to be said. I wish that this book as well as books by Ayaan Hirsi Ali were mandatory reading in high school, or at the very least, in college. I would like to read more books by her. I’m not going to include my favorite quotes here. They can be found on my Good Reads review

 

9780349100135.jpg   9780847825042.jpg

 

MY RATING SYSTEM

5 Stars

Fantastic, couldn't put it down

4 Stars

Really Good

3 Stars

Enjoyable

2 Stars

Just Okay – nothing to write home about

1 Star

Rubbish – waste of my money and time. Few books make it to this level, since I usually give up on them if they’re that bad.

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Happy Sunday and welcome to week five in our Open Roads Reading Adventure. Greetings to all our readers and to all following our progress. Mister Linky is available weekly on 52 Books in 52 Weeks to share a link to your book reviews.

 

Next week, the Great Mysterious British road trip will begin and and will affectionately be called Brit Tripping from here on. The trip is hosted by Sandy and Amy and they are here to tell you all about the rules, the ranks, trips, and the schedule.

 

 

*******

This year we’ll be following the Roman roads through England with the intent of reading a book from each of the 45 counties with a few extra trips to London. At the beginning of the week we’ll check in with our route and we’ll post what we’ve read. Pack your bags and kindles and audiobooks and get ready to Brit Trip!

 

One of the challenges we discovered in planning was that the counties change frequently and in many places overlap with other counties and then there’s some disagreement on what is and isn’t a county.

 

Here’s an interesting article on the confusion of English counties!

 

 

General rules:

 

· Join in for as much as you want. This is supposed to be fun.

· Let us know if you are in so we know who we are caravanning with!

· Rereads are allowed.

· No page number minimum.

· Please follow us on Goodreads. We’ll be shelving our Brit Tripping reads on their own shelf. To see what counties are included you need to go MumtoTwo’s page and click on SETTINGS next to the search box and check the box for RECOMMENDER. Then at the bottom of the beige box click on CLOSE.

· Send Amy a PM and she will email you a printable copy of our itinerary to keep track of our trips and books.

· If you would like to receive postcards please send your address to Robin.

· Our expected itinerary will be posted every Sunday in Robin’s weekly post.

· The itinerary for the year is posted on Robin’s 52 Books Blog.

 

 

Join a bus:

  • The Detectives (Mystery reading)
  • The Rebels (Mixed genre reading)

All those who joined us for our adventures will earn a rank based on number of counties completed.

 

27073136_1832125793464797_48265315697013

 

And the final level is The Bertram Wooster. That is earned by reading one book set in England of any genre but failing spectacularly at all other challenges. A good attitude must be maintained despite numerous hardships. Employing a Gentleman’s Gentleman is optional but encouraged. Bonus points awarded if you are accidentally engaged multiple times during the year.

 

 

Schedule:

 

 

Ermine Street

  • 2/04 - London (Scotland Yard)
  • 2/11 – Cambridgeshire
  • 2/18 – Huntingdonshire
  • 2/25 – Bedfordshire
  • 3/04 – Northampton shire and Rutland
  • 3/11 - Nottinghamshire
  • 3/18 - East and West Riding of Yorkshire
  • 3/25 – York

Dere Street

  • 4/01 – North Yorkshire
  • 4/08 – Durham
  • 4/15 – Tyne and Wear
  • 4/22 – Northumbria

Ichnield Way

  • 4/29 – Isle of Wight
  • 5/06 – Dorset
  • 5/13 – Hampshire
  • 5/20 – Berkshire
  • 5/27 – Buckinghamshire
  • 6/03 – Herefordshire
  • 6/10 – Essex
  • 6/17 – Suffolk
  • 6/24 - Norfolk

Fosse Way

  • 7/01 – Cornwall
  • 7/08 – Devon
  • 7/15 – Dorset
  • 7/22 – Gloucestershire
  • 7/29 – Derbyshire
  • 8/12 – Lincolnshire

Akemam Street

  • 8/19 – London
  • 8/26 – Oxfordshire
  • 9/02 – Wiltshire
  • 9/09 – Somerset

Watling Way

  • 09/16 – Kent
  • 09/23 – Sussex
  • 09/30 – Surrey
  • 10/07 – Spooky London
  • 10/14 – Worcestershire
  • 10/21 – Warwickshire
  • 10/28 – West Midlands
  • 11/04 – Staffordshire
  • 11/11 – Shropshire
  • 11/18 – Cheshire
  • 11/25 – Merseyside
  • 12/02 – Manchester
  • 12/09 – Lancashire
  • 12/16 – Cumbria

Christmas in London

 

We hope you enjoy traveling around England with us!

 

Love – Sandy (Mumto2) and Amy (Aggieamy)

 

******************************************

 

What are you reading this week?

 

 

 

Link to week four

I love this!!!

 

Thank you for all the work !

 

I am not sure I can join without buying too many books... :(

But I would like to receive the printable version, just to see how far I will come.

 

Amy, Robin has my email, is it possible to forward the printable version? My PM is still dysfucntonal.

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This week I read Make Your Bed before I got to the library. It's Admiral William H. McRaven's expanded graduation speech to UT Austin a few years back. Quick read. I was going to read and give to library book sale, but maybe I'll leave it out for the girls and see if they want to peruse his life advice.

 

I finished A Man Called Ove for book club and I enjoyed it. I thought it was humorous and I liked the cast of characters. I am now reading a Heyer book, Regency Buck, which I'm mostly enjoying. There are a few racial/ethnic sensitivity things I can't quite ignore (the Negro boxer, Jewish money lenders), but I like the spunky female lead.

 

Up next: I have Augustown, and SWB's Rethinking School and A Gentleman in Moscow are waiting for me at the library.

 

I'm enjoying shared reading experiences with my dds this year. Jolabokaflod got us going on that and it's extending to other books. My 15 yo really enjoyed The Hate U Give. My 17 yo may try to pick that up and read it before it's due at the end of the week. She's read a lot of our book flood books--probably more than I have so far.

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I started my job volunteering at the library. It was wonderful! The children's librarian had songs, dances, and books. I just needed to help pass out materials and be the hype person for the kids. I loved it!

 

Books read last week:

  • You Are Not a Gadget by Jaron Lanier. Nonfiction - Speculative Computer Science. A look at the rise of the Internet and how it's shaped human behavior. Lanier has a way of string words together that sound insightful, but end up being a mess when thought about logically.
  • Perdido Street Station by China Mieville. Weird Fiction. A rogue scientist, while searching for ways to make a man fly, ends up unleashing monsters on the city. I've added Mieville to my author list where I want to complete the full catalog. His worlds are imaginatively weird and the characters, even those not fully human, well-written.
  • Before the Dawn: Recovering the Lost History of Our Ancestors by Nicholas Wade. Science and Pre-History. A journalist for the New York Times science section writes about human pre-history pulling discoveries from genetics, anthropology, linquistics, and other sciences. Kathy, I think we'd discussed Jared Diamond's The Third Chimpanzee and I couldn't endorse it. I think this book might be up your alley.
  • Doomsday Book by Connie Willis. Science Fiction. A historian travels back in time to the medieval period and finds herself stranded there. Number 98 on the NPR Science Fiction and Fantasy Top 100.
  • Under Heaven by Guy Gavriel Kay. Historical Fiction - Tang Dynasty China. After spending two years burying the dead fallen in battle, a soldier receives a generous gift which thrusts him into imperial court intrigues. This was so good! I think I'd tried to read it last year and just didn't devote enough attention to finish. If you liked The Sunne in Splendour, I think you might like Under Heaven.

The first of my nostalgic fantasy reads came in: The Unschooled Wizard by Barbara Hamby. Before getting to it, I'm hoping to finish up Lucifer's Hammer, my next Top 100 read. I'm also listening to Electric Universe which is a microhistory on the discovery of electricity and the creation of electronics. 

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We Love Books:    Hello long lost friends! Life has been a whirlwind for a few years but settling down now. My goal for this year is to just open a book. I finished Midwifes Confession. Working on The hand maids tale, the book thief (a reread for me) and book 12 of the women's murder club.
Speaking of children's books we loved as kids, I loved the babysitters club books. Loved them

 

 

Welcome back!!! 

 

 

I read If This is a Man/The Truce - 3 Stars - This is a powerful story of Primo Levi who was imprisoned in Auschwitz. I’m giving it 3 stars, since I felt that his writing style was confusing and tedious.

 

I believe that this is the first holocaust account that I have read that has been written from an objective, rather detached and unemotional point of view, or at least the first that I can remember. I know that if I had gone through all those horrors, there is no way in God’s green earth that I could have felt the same way. No way.

 

Some of my favorite quotes:

 

"One of the most important things I had learnt in Auschwitz was that one must always avoid being a nobody. All roads are closed to a person who appears to be useless, all are open to a person who has a function, even the most fatuous."

 

“I am constantly amazed by man's inhumanity to man.â€

 

and The Rage and the Pride - 5 Stars - When I started reading this book, I did not realize that the author, Oriana Fallaci, died over a decade ago. In fact, I didn’t know much about her at all. She definitely had a unique style and lived through some turbulent times. As a teenager in Italy, she had fought Mussolini’s fascist regime. Then later as a war reporter, she covered major conflicts throughout the world. She was probably the only Western journalist to have interviewed Ayatollah Khomeini twice. She called the chador, “a stupid, medieval ragâ€.

 

Fallaci spent her last years between her native Tuscany and New York City. The U.S. was her adopted homeland and she loved it dearly. She wrote this book after the horrific 9/11 attacks, while living in Manhattan. In true Italian anger and passion, she lashed out at everyone that she felt was responsible in even the most minor ways – from Islamic fundamentalists all the way to those that she refers to as the “cicadas†– the politically correct elite. This was entertaining to read. Her rage was not only with regards to 9/11, but also what she could see happening to her native Italy and throughout Europe. She was not one to spare words or feelings. She just let it run. No political correctness for her!

 

One of my favorite parts is when she refers to historic landmarks throughout the world – the Statue of Liberty, Big Ben, Notre Dame, and so on, but then she reminds the reader that as an Italian, she worries about the Sistine Chapel, St. Peter’s Dome, and and on and on. swears that if the terrorists destroy Italy’s landmarks:

“I swear. It is I who would become the holy warrior. … War you wanted? War you want? Good. As far as I am concerned, war is war and war will be. Until the last breath.â€

 

Naturally, she made many enemies from the time that this book was published until the few short years when she died. I believe that she would be devastated by all that has been happening in Europe, her beloved United States, and her native Italy. 

 

This is not really a book per se. The author intended it be a sermon, a wake-up call. Do not read it if you are easily offended. Otherwise, I wish that everyone would read this thought-provoking and important work. These are things that need to be said. I wish that this book as well as books by Ayaan Hirsi Ali were mandatory reading in high school, or at the very least, in college. I would like to read more books by her. I’m not going to include my favorite quotes here. They can be found on my Good Reads review

 

Thanks for sharing and linking to your good reads review.  Now I want to read her book. Adding to my wishlist.

 

I love this!!!

Thank you for all the work !

I am not sure I can join without buying too many books... :(
But I would like to receive the printable version, just to see how far I will come.

Amy, Robin has my email, is it possible to forward the printable version? My PM is still dysfucntonal.

Pm'ed your info to Amy so she can send you the list.  

 

This week I read Make Your Bed before I got to the library. It's Admiral William H. McRaven's expanded graduation speech to UT Austin a few years back. Quick read. I was going to read and give to library book sale, but maybe I'll leave it out for the girls and see if they want to peruse his life advice.

 

I finished A Man Called Ove for book club and I enjoyed it. I thought it was humorous and I liked the cast of characters. I am now reading a Heyer book, Regency Buck, which I'm mostly enjoying. There are a few racial/ethnic sensitivity things I can't quite ignore (the Negro boxer, Jewish money lenders), but I like the spunky female lead.

 

Up next: I have Augustown, and SWB's Rethinking School and A Gentleman in Moscow are waiting for me at the library.

 

I'm enjoying shared reading experiences with my dds this year. Jolabokaflod got us going on that and it's extending to other books. My 15 yo really enjoyed The Hate U Give. My 17 yo may try to pick that up and read it before it's due at the end of the week. She's read a lot of our book flood books--probably more than I have so far.

A Gentleman in Moscow sounds really familiar and I could swear I read a book about him years ago.  Could be confusing it with something else.  Adding to my wishlist.

Edited by Robin M
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I started my job volunteering at the library. It was wonderful! The children's librarian had songs, dances, and books. I just needed to help pass out materials and be the hype person for the kids. I loved it!

 

Books read last week:

  • You Are Not a Gadget by Jaron Lanier. Nonfiction - Speculative Computer Science. A look at the rise of the Internet and how it's shaped human behavior. Lanier has a way of string words together that sound insightful, but end up being a mess when thought about logically.
  • Perdido Street Station by China Mieville. Weird Fiction. A rogue scientist, while searching for ways to make a man fly, ends up unleashing monsters on the city. I've added Mieville to my author list where I want to complete the full catalog. His worlds are imaginatively weird and the characters, even those not fully human, well-written. Stacia, you asked me about Mieville last week. I think you might like the style, but I don't know if this is the book for you. It's even more gruesome than Kraken. Let me see if I can find one of his books that has more weird than horror.
  • Before the Dawn: Recovering the Lost History of Our Ancestors by Nicholas Wade. Science and Pre-History. A journalist for the New York Times science section writes about human pre-history pulling discoveries from genetics, anthropology, linquistics, and other sciences. Kathy, I think we'd discussed Jared Diamond's The Third Chimpanzee and I couldn't endorse it. I think this book might be up your alley.
  • Doomsday Book by Connie Willis. Science Fiction. A historian travels back in time to the medieval period and finds herself stranded there. Number 98 on the NPR Science Fiction and Fantasy Top 100.
  • Under Heaven by Guy Gavriel Kay. Historical Fiction - Tang Dynasty China. After spending two years burying the dead fallen in battle, a soldier receives a generous gift which thrusts him into imperial court intrigues. This was so good! I think I'd tried to read it last year and just didn't devote enough attention to finish. If you liked The Sunne in Splendour, I think you might like Under Heaven.

The first of my nostalgic fantasy reads came in: The Unschooled Wizard by Barbara Hamby. Before getting to it, I'm hoping to finish up Lucifer's Hammer, my next Top 100 read. I'm also listening to Electric Universe which is a microhistory on the discovery of electricity and the creation of electronics. 

Happy to hear you are enjoying volunteering at the library.   I read all of Larry Niven's books years ago and just took at look at the NPR list. I've read almost half of them.   When I finish WOT series, I may go back and revisit Mote in God's Eye. Remember liking that one a lot way back when.  I did enjoy Sunne in Splendour so will have to check out Under Heaven. 

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I just finished listening to another of Charles Finch's Charlie Lennox mysteries while working on the Goodreads list input. It was good but took place at sea! So I couldn't really assign it to a county easily, they left from Plymouth so it will be Devon! It was good....

 

Regarding the Goodreads list please remember they are just ideas. I have gone through lots of lists and compiled my own but some books are multi county and the list just works well with one county so I picked. I am happy to add books to the list so feel free to let me know any ideas that should be added. I have had a great time putting it together and definitely plan to keep expanding it!

 

I am also finishing my last Murakami for 2018. A Wild Sheep Chase is the third in the Rat trilogy and the best by far.

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I just finished listening to another of Charles Finch's Charlie Lennox mysteries while working on the Goodreads list input. It was good but took place at sea! So I couldn't really assign it to a county easily, they left from Plymouth so it will be Devon! It was good....

 

 

 

Was that Burial at Sea? I read that one last year for the Seaworthy square on BaW bingo. I read the next one in the series but haven't read anymore. I want to get back to that series this year but there's been a change in Lenox's situation that I'm not completely happy with. I'm hoping the series gets back to its roots at some point.

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Oh, Brit Tripping sounds fun! My reading has been rather...lackluster as of late and this might just be a good chance to liven things up a little! Our library system joined a larger library system which vastly increased the number and variety of books to request so maybe I can even find them in the new system!

 

I’m reading books on running right now “Racing Weight†plus a couple of epistolary novels and one book about someone else reading, “My Life with Bob†bu Pamela Paul. The kids and I have gone back to a favorite book for our read aloud, “Charlotte’s Web†since my youngest cannot remember me having read it to them. The older two and I start ourown book club (they don’t know this yet, lol) next month. We’re going to read “Elijah of Buxton†together using BW’s Arrow for it.

 

I’m also working on collecting some books to donate to the local jail. They’ve put out requests for paperback donations since the budget for books is small. Any favorites here anyone would like to recommend? I have a small personal budget to buy a few new paperbacks in addition to the gently used one’s I’ve collected so far.

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I finished : ‘The hate u gave’ and ‘the map that changed the world’ this week.

I don’t consider both books as ‘enjoyable reads’ so I am looking for something more enjoyable :)

 

The map that changed the world is for the carthography square.

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While I won't be boarding a bus for Brit Tripping I might run into some of you as you travel. I just bought The Secret Keeper with one of my Audible credits and I'm sure I'll read several British mysteries before the year is out, as I usually do (some set in the past, some not). I'll wave if I see you on the high street or in the countryside. :)

Edited by Lady Florida.
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Was that Burial at Sea? I read that one last year for the Seaworthy square on BaW bingo. I read the next one in the series but haven't read anymore. I want to get back to that series this year but there's been a change in Lenox's situation that I'm not completely happy with. I'm hoping the series gets back to its roots at some point.

  

While I won't be boarding a bus for Brit Tripping I might run into some of you as you travel. I just bought The Secret Keeper with one of my Audible credits and I'm sure I'll read several British mysteries before the year is out, as I usually do (some set in the past, some not). I'll wave if I see you on the high street or in the countryside. :)

Yes, it was Burial at Sea. I was trying to get a post done while cooking dinner and didn't have time to do links or hunt for the exact title. I am now sort of dreading the change in his personal life.....I hope it isn't what my mind springs to. I really love this series so far.

 

Regarding Brit Tripping we hope everyone remembers that we have two tracks. Mystery and other books. If someone wants to read classics (your Shakespeare challenge for instance) and keep track I want to make it clear Amy and I totally consider you to be Brit Tripping. You are participating as a Rebel. ;) I haven't attributed county's to many classics because they didn't appear on my lists and newspaper articles but they are welcome. I just didn't have time but would love to add more. The Secret Keeper is set in Kent I believe. Great book and is on my Goodreads county list. I even have Sci Fi and Fantasy on my list. I tried really hard to be inclusive.

 

The main goal here is to have fun and discover new books. I really hope to read a mystery for each county but that's my personal goal mainly because I am in the mood to read series mysteries. I have a great stack which I will share as soon as I get done entering books into Goodreads.

 

  

Oh, Brit Tripping sounds fun! My reading has been rather...lackluster as of late and this might just be a good chance to liven things up a little! Our library system joined a larger library system which vastly increased the number and variety of books to request so maybe I can even find them in the new system!

 

We would love to have you join us!

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Hi everybody! 

 

I'd love to do some Brit Tripping so will climb aboard the Rebels bus. :).  I'll be pm'ing Amy for the printable guide, too.  :driving:

 

I finished Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/16250900-code-name-verity Expectations of a book are such a funny thing. I bought this on sale for my kindle a couple years ago and tried to read it then but just couldn't get into it.   Because of its female lead and no love story, I gave it to my 17yo for her birthday. She hasn't read it yet (sigh) but I decided to try reading it again and was hooked. I really liked this and gave it five stars. 

 

My son's wedding was last weekend - it was a lovely ceremony and everyone had a great time. I cried. He's my oldest son and the first of my children to be married. I'm thrilled with my daughter-in-law and think they will have a good life together. :) I'll post a picture as soon as we get them - one of my daughters did the photography for the wedding. 

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Regarding Brit Tripping we hope everyone remembers that we have two tracks. Mystery and other books. If someone wants to read classics (your Shakespeare challenge for instance) and keep track I want to make it clear Amy and I totally consider you to be Brit Tripping. You are participating as a Rebel. ;) I haven't attributed county's to many classics because they didn't appear on my lists and newspaper articles but they are welcome. I just didn't have time but would love to add more. The Secret Keeper is set in Kent I believe. Great book and is on my Goodreads county list. I even have Sci Fi and Fantasy on my list. I tried really hard to be inclusive.

 

 

This is the year I decided to skip challenges though. I'd rather meander around the world and if I bump into some BaW friends in my travels so much the better. :)

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Hello all. I just wanted to jump in and say hello. I have been swamped with kids things and unexpected company today so I haven't been able to get on. I will send emails and list tomorrow.

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Finished 2 books, and ironically two I was attempting not to read at the same time!  


 


8. The Door into Ocean - It was slow to get into, but I really liked it by the end.  We read this for scifi book club, and someone brought up some talking points by the author for a class she taught on it (she's a professor), and some of those annoyed me!  If it hadn't been the author herself bringing those things up, I would have argued that the author didn't mean that at all and that the book was much more nuanced!   But I did like it, and I think I may read other books by her in the future...  :lol:  4 stars.


 


9. Dune by Frank Herbert (audio) - well, I'm glad that I listened to it on audio, because I don't think I would have gotten through it otherwise.  Started slow, started to pick up for me around part two, but then lost me again toward the end.  Perhaps I have read this far too long after it was written.  I found myself very annoyed by many things (storyline stuff, sexism, technical stuff) which I can rant about if anyone wants to hear, but I'll leave for now.  Oddly, the whole story reminded me a bit of The Palace of Illusions, that I read last year and loved.  But I think I gave all the 'terrible purpose' and 'horrible war that cannot be prevented because vengeance' and a character who has a special relationship to the gods and can see the train wreck coming was more palatable because it was based on an old, old story (the Mahabarata), not appropriating religious language from another culture, and hey, for once the woman gets to have five husbands instead of the other way around!  


 


I gave it three stars, but as it's sitting with me it's sliding toward two... maybe 2.5?


 


Currently reading:


 


Word by Word by Kory Stamper (ebook).  Word nerd that I am, I'm really enjoying this one.  :)


 


Nirgendwo in Afrika/Nowhere in Africa by Stefanie Zweig - also really enjoying this one.  The omniscient point of view jumps around to different characters quite a bit, but I can forgive that since I like the characters, the setting, and the story, which is based on the author's childhood in Kenya after they escaped Germany just before WWII (they were Jewish).


 


Celine by Peter Heller (audiobook) - Not that far in yet; still trying to figure out where it's going!


 


 


Coming up:


 


Both next audio and ebook are going to be dependent on what comes in or is otherwise available on Overdrive...  I've got Augustown, La Belle Sauvage, and The Girl in the Tower out of the library, so one or more of those will be my next hardcopy book.


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My son's wedding was last weekend - it was a lovely ceremony and everyone had a great time. I cried. He's my oldest son and the first of my children to be married. I'm thrilled with my daughter-in-law and think they will have a good life together. :) I'll post a picture as soon as we get them - one of my daughters did the photography for the wedding. 

 

 

Oh my!! Congratulations!!! 

 

No Brit Tripping for me, though as an unabashed fan of all sorts of British mysteries, I'll be bumping into y'all along the way. And adding lots of titles to my long TBR list.  For example, I thought I had read the first few Charles Lenox books, but after reading the description on Goodreads, it seems I have it confused with the series about the WWI vet who had the "ghost" of his dead Scottish army buddy working cases with him. Guess I didn't read the Charles Lenox books after all, and have a shiny new series to try!

 

And I need some paper versions of mysteries as, so far, my 2018 reading has been exclusively audiobooks. Which is weird as I usually have several books going at a time, both print and audio. 

 

I finished The Goblin Emperor last night, and really liked it. It is so very different from other fantasy novels in that it is purely character driven, and the action is not sprawling in battle scenes and quests across vast landscapes, but all happens in the limited setting of a palace and the surrounding town.  It's like a Jane Austen novel in that way -- we are always in the character's mind, watching how the character acts as others come in and out of the scene. It is a classic bildungsroman, the mental and emotional journey of a very decent and likable young man who is unexpectedly thrust on the emperor's throne and must learn to cope with the position, the politics, the loneliness, the expectations of others. 

 

I could have used the print version, however, as all the names sounded alike and I had no compendium at the back of the book to remind me of who a character is. And there were a few obvious turns in the plot, and a few clunky moments, but overall it was a refreshing, positive change of pace. The yin to the yang of Game of Thrones!

 

Next up in my audible queue is Beryl Markham's West With the Night.

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I'm intrigued by the Brit Tripping and might try to spend some time sorting out how I could participate as a Rebel.  

 

I finished the romance I was reading last week -   The Day of the Duchess by Sarah MacLean I enjoyed the fact that

the characters didn't hate each other, and even though there were plenty of typical romance tropes, both female and male leads

were witty and caring, which is not something I am used to finding.  

 

I've started The World Between Two Covers by Ann Morgan, which is about her reading books from all the countries in the world.  So far, I am not getting into it at all.  And since she is spending a decent chunk of the first chapter talking about the plethora of books in the world and how hard it is to realize that you will only read a small amount of them and wondering how you choose, I am only going to give this book another 20 or so pages before deciding if I choose to read a different one!

 

Off to research books set in London, involving Scotland yard.  I see I have a week to come up with something non mysterious.  I guess I could read a mystery and still be a rebel.  Right?  Rebels can do anything. 

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I've got too many books going simultaneously, and need to settle down and finish some. Besides unfinished books from last week, I'm reading Blaise Pascal's Pensees, excerpts from which Middle Girl will be discussing in her book group next week. This is the source of the famous Le coeur a ses raisons que la raison ne connait point ("The heart has its reasons of which reason know nothing."). The Pensees is a fascinating collection of snippets of writings which Pascal was preparing as the framework for a book, but he died before writing it. So the fragmentary, sometimes cryptic, nature of the Pensees ("Thoughts"; not Pascal's title) is accidental, and yet part of its attraction.

 

And then suddenly a copy of Dylan Thomas' short prose writings, the posthumous Quite Early in the Morning, leapt into my hands, and I couldn't resist starting it. What poetry this prose is. Reading the introduction, I realized that both Pascal and Thomas died at the age of 39. As did Flannery O'Connor.

 

Also, earlier in the week I read Tove "Moomintroll" Jansson's short novel The True Deceiver.

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I've started The World Between Two Covers by Ann Morgan, which is about her reading books from all the countries in the world. So far, I am not getting into it at all. And since she is spending a decent chunk of the first chapter talking about the plethora of books in the world and how hard it is to realize that you will only read a small amount of them and wondering how you choose, I am only going to give this book another 20 or so pages before deciding if I choose to read a different one!

 

I could have sworn I started to read that one and abandoned it, but my Goodreads doesn’t back it up, unless I deleted it from my shelf instead of listing it as “dnf.†Anyway, I vaguely remember starting a book like tha5 and abandoning it for much the same reason you indicate. I enjoy books about peiole reading books, but it’s going to have to get to it and be mostly about that sort of thing.

 

I finished the very short “Dear Ijeawele†by the Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and will now need to seek out her other books.

 

I’ve also made progress in Ursula K. Le Guin’s “No Time to Spare†which I got on OverDrive before realizing the significance if who she was and just before it was announced that she had died. I’m enjoying it in much the way I did Terry Pratchett - late to the game as always it seems. I love how she describes her cat Pardo and his single minded focus on beetles as well as her comments on the letters she receives from children.

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My son's wedding was last weekend - it was a lovely ceremony and everyone had a great time. I cried. He's my oldest son and the first of my children to be married. I'm thrilled with my daughter-in-law and think they will have a good life together. :) I'll post a picture as soon as we get them - one of my daughters did the photography for the wedding. 

That is beautiful!

So good to read that the day went well.

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Nirgendwo in Afrika/Nowhere in Africa by Stefanie Zweig - also really enjoying this one.  The omniscient point of view jumps around to different characters quite a bit, but I can forgive that since I like the characters, the setting, and the story, which is based on the author's childhood in Kenya after they escaped Germany just before WWII (they were Jewish).

 

This sounds great -- I'm going to check this one out.  

 

And congratulations to mothersweets and family!!!!

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It's so hot here for us - 32.7 C at 4:30pm, which must be nearly 91 F? - that all we feel like doing is to try to find the coolest spot to sit in with a book to read and an ice crammed drink to sip.

 

Last week was a very busy one so I switched things over to easy, enjoyable reads and completed the following on audio:

-  Listening Valley ~ D.E. Stevenson   

vintage read/clean romance.  WWII.  Edinburgh, Scotland.   Miss Buncle's Book is still my favourite Stevenson title.  Could generate triggers for some (child who’s parents neglect her so she reverts inside herself to cope,  others trying to manipulate her as an adult  – see reviews over at goodreads   Ends well ;) ).  

 

-  Alice in Wonderland, and, Through the Looking Glass ~ Lewis Caroll   

Lewis fans will not want to read the next bit... this is the first time I've been through these titles and found the experience average at best.  :leaving:   

 

-  Murder on the Flying Scotman: A Daisy Dalrymple Mystery, Book 4 ~ Carola Dunn  cosy mystery.  London-to-Edinburgh train

I'd rate this as a 3 out of 5.  Dunn seems to be giving a slight nod to Agatha Christie' s Murder on the Orient Express.  

 

New to my book basket this week are:

-  Rethinking School ~ Susan Bauer  N/F   Education

-  Suggestible You ~ Erik Vance  N/F  Psychology

 

I'm going to see how things progress with being a rebel on the Brit Trip. Raifta mentioned that rebels can do anything, right?    :)

I might try   An Impartial Witness: A Bess Crawford Mystery Bk#2 ~ Charles Todd    (London/Scotland Yard)

Though I'd rather start in Kent with the first book in the series,    A Duty to the Dead: A Bess Crawford Mystery Bk#1 ~ Charles Todd.

Looks like I might have to catch you at the next stop as I'm thinking of getting off the bus before we've even started  :laugh: 

 

ETA:  Some of you have been mentioning The Artist's Way ~ Julia Cameron.  Amazing coincidence, I found a brand new copy, just put on the shelf, of this at my local library.  Looking forward to reading it.

I also brought home:

First Lady:  The Life and Wars of Clementine Churchill ~ Sonia Purnell

The Time Keeper: A Novel ~ Mitch Albom

 

Edited by Tuesdays Child
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Oh my!! Congratulations!!! 

 

No Brit Tripping for me, though as an unabashed fan of all sorts of British mysteries, I'll be bumping into y'all along the way. And adding lots of titles to my long TBR list.  For example, I thought I had read the first few Charles Lenox books, but after reading the description on Goodreads, it seems I have it confused with the series about the WWI vet who had the "ghost" of his dead Scottish army buddy working cases with him. Guess I didn't read the Charles Lenox books after all, and have a shiny new series to try!

 

 

The Ian Rutledge series by Charles Todd, right? I think you and I both read three or four of those a few years ago and liked them but got a bit fed up with the lack of character development. Correct me if I'm misremembering. 

 

Test of Wills

 

Hi everybody! 

 

I'd love to do some Brit Tripping so will climb aboard the Rebels bus. :).  I'll be pm'ing Amy for the printable guide, too.  :driving:

 

I finished Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/16250900-code-name-verity Expectations of a book are such a funny thing. I bought this on sale for my kindle a couple years ago and tried to read it then but just couldn't get into it.   Because of its female lead and no love story, I gave it to my 17yo for her birthday. She hasn't read it yet (sigh) but I decided to try reading it again and was hooked. I really liked this and gave it five stars. 

 

 

 

Code Name Verity totally counts for Brit Tripping!

 

 

I'm going to see how things progress with being a rebel on the Brit Trip. Raifta mentioned that rebels can do anything, right?     :)

I might try   An Impartial Witness: A Bess Crawford Mystery Bk#2 ~ Charles Todd    (London/Scotland Yard)

Though I'd rather start in Kent with the first book in the series,    A Duty to the DeadA Bess Crawford Mystery Bk#1 ~ Charles Todd.

Looks like I might have to catch you at the next stop as I'm thinking of getting off the bus before we've even started   :laugh: 

 

 

I'm intrigued by the Brit Tripping and might try to spend some time sorting out how I could participate as a Rebel.  

 

Off to research books set in London, involving Scotland yard.  I see I have a week to come up with something non mysterious.  I guess I could read a mystery and still be a rebel.  Right?  Rebels can do anything. 

 

 

I have to laugh because I feel like the Rebel bus if off to an appropriate start for their name. It left a week early!  :seeya:   :lol:

 

Drive slowly around London for the next week and the Mystery Tour will catch up with you.

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My son's wedding was last weekend - it was a lovely ceremony and everyone had a great time. I cried. He's my oldest son and the first of my children to be married. I'm thrilled with my daughter-in-law and think they will have a good life together. :) I'll post a picture as soon as we get them - one of my daughters did the photography for the wedding. 

 

 

Congrats on the wedding can't wait to see pictures!

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This Present Darkness was a book I loved when I was younger lol.  I still have it on my shelf and revisited it a couple years ago.  It has a nostalgic feeling for me lol.

 

 

This week was another slower week around here; I finished a couple, Pink finished a couple, and I think that's about it.  

 

Me:

Men Without Women - Haruki Murakami - a good collection of short stories.  I enjoyed them and there were even a couple I didn't want to see end.

The Secret Keeper - Kate Morton - quite enjoyable.

 

Pink (8.5):

George Washington, the Man Who Would Not Be King

Les Miserables (a child-friendly version.  I don't censor books, either, to speak of, but... yeah.   :lol:  There's still such thing as an appropriate time lol :D )

 

 

Currently:

 

After starting The Artist's Way the other day, I decided to make my 'week' go from Saturday to Saturday, so I started on the official 'Week 1' chapter of that yesterday.  I AM REALLY BAD AT DOING THE MORNING PAGES lol.  Sigh.  I'll get better, hopefully.

 

At first I was kind of disappointed with the whole Ghost Bride mistake I made (:lol:) and I was like, 'eh, I didn't love it, maybe I'll drop it, but I'll just try reading some more first to see if it hooks me...' and it did.  So now I'm probably over halfway through it?  Not necessarily what I expected, but it's fun.  I'm enjoying it.  

 

Hmmm and since I am aiming for Chrysanthemum (one of the reasons I thought I needed to scrap Ghost Bride is because it doesn't go in there anywhere!) this is where I'm standing so far.  I've decided to stick with the beginnings of titles (aside from The) this month:

 

C - The Crucible

H - Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

R - The Residence

Y -      You Shall Know Our Velocity is sitting on my side table to start once I finish my current read!

S - The Secret Keeper

A - The Artist's Way (I won't have finished it, but that's ok, I'm counting it anyway. :lol: )

N - Never Let Me Go

T - 

H - 

E - 

M - Men Without Women

U - 

M - 

 

I won't be finishing this in the next few days, most likely, lol.  But that's okay, February is Rose.  :lol:  So.  Overall I still think I'm doing pretty darn good! :D

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Oh my!! Congratulations!!! 

 

 

 

 

That is beautiful!

So good to read that the day went well.

 

 

This sounds great -- I'm going to check this one out.  

 

And congratulations to mothersweets and family!!!!

 

 

Congrats on the wedding can't wait to see pictures!

 

Thank you everyone!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Code Name Verity totally counts for Brit Tripping!

 

 

 

 

I have to laugh because I feel like the Rebel bus if off to an appropriate start for their name. It left a week early!  :seeya:   :lol:

 

Drive slowly around London for the next week and the Mystery Tour will catch up with you.

 

 

Yay! I feel like I'm ahead now. :) So the next book I should read is supposed to be set in London, correct? Or can I just do whatever since I'm a rebel? 

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I started my job volunteering at the library. It was wonderful! The children's librarian had songs, dances, and books. I just needed to help pass out materials and be the hype person for the kids. I loved it!

 

What a wonderful job to be doing, no wonder you're loving it!

I have to laugh because I feel like the Rebel bus if off to an appropriate start for their name. It left a week early!  :seeya:   :lol:

 

Grin. I just realised I am a week ahead of the startup.  

(I think I may just have to stay on my Rebel bus, as I have to leave Brit Lit in mid- Feb to organise DS 18th & DD 16th birthdays, and, parent.I.L's 60th wedding anniversary which all fall within a weeks time frame.)

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Amy!! I just found my next book.  There is a new John Pickett book available!  Mystery Loves Company(John Pickett #7).   https://www.amazon.com/Mystery-Loves-Company-Another-Pickett-ebook/dp/B0791LBT8Z/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1517204454&sr=1-1&keywords=mystery+loves+company and looks like it is set in London!

 

Edited by Mothersweets
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The Ian Rutledge series by Charles Todd, right? I think you and I both read three or four of those a few years ago and liked them but got a bit fed up with the lack of character development. Correct me if I'm misremembering. 

 

Test of Wills

 

That's it! The confusion comes from too many Charles -- Charles Todd the author, the Charles Lenox series by Charles Finch. And too add to the confusion I was thinking I had read the Ian Rankin books because of the character Ian Rutledge! 

 

And you remember correctly that we, and a few others here, I think, had enjoyed them well enough but gave up. That's why I was confused when you and Kathy were talking about Charles Lenox going to sea -- I was wondering why you both were still reading the series we had abandoned a couple of years ago.

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That's it! The confusion comes from too many Charles -- Charles Todd the author, the Charles Lenox series by Charles Finch. And too add to the confusion I was thinking I had read the Ian Rankin books because of the character Ian Rutledge! 

 

And you remember correctly that we, and a few others here, I think, had enjoyed them well enough but gave up. That's why I was confused when you and Kathy were talking about Charles Lenox going to sea -- I was wondering why you both were still reading the series we had abandoned a couple of years ago.

 

 

I have a couple of chapters of the first Ian Rutledge completed on my Kindle and have the admit I am now a bit concerned. ;). I remember how enthusiastic you all were...

 

I think you will like the Charles Finch series. Definitely a must be read in order, at least for me because I skipped ahead because of a missing book issue a couple of years ago and quit. The book I skipped ahead to was on my kindle and the kindle remembered. As I went by my furthest spot on this read all I could do was wonder why I had abandoned a book that was just getting really good!

 

 

What a wonderful job to be doing, no wonder you're loving it!

 

Grin. I just realised I am a week ahead of the startup.  

(I think I may just have to stay on my Rebel bus, as I have to leave Brit Lit in mid- Feb to organise DS 18th & DD 16th birthdays, and, parent.I.L's 60th wedding anniversary which all fall within a weeks time frame.)

  

 

You can hop back on when your events are over! Enjoy all the special memories....Married 60 years, how amazing.

 

  

 

This week was another slower week around here; I finished a couple, Pink finished a couple, and I think that's about it.  

 

Me:

Men Without Women - Haruki Murakami - a good collection of short stories.  I enjoyed them and there were even a couple I didn't want to see end.

The Secret Keeper - Kate Morton - quite enjoyable.

 

Pink (8.5):

George Washington, the Man Who Would Not Be King

Les Miserables (a child-friendly version.  I don't censor books, either, to speak of, but... yeah.   :lol:  There's still such thing as an appropriate time lol :D )

 

 

Currently:

 

After starting The Artist's Way the other day, I decided to make my 'week' go from Saturday to Saturday, so I started on the official 'Week 1' chapter of that yesterday.  I AM REALLY BAD AT DOING THE MORNING PAGES lol.  Sigh.  I'll get better, hopefully.

 

At first I was kind of disappointed with the whole Ghost Bride mistake I made (:lol:) and I was like, 'eh, I didn't love it, maybe I'll drop it, but I'll just try reading some more first to see if it hooks me...' and it did.  So now I'm probably over halfway through it?  Not necessarily what I expected, but it's fun.  I'm enjoying it.  

 

Hmmm and since I am aiming for Chrysanthemum (one of the reasons I thought I needed to scrap Ghost Bride is because it doesn't go in there anywhere!) this is where I'm standing so far.  I've decided to stick with the beginnings of titles (aside from The) this month:

 

C - The Crucible

H - Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

R - The Residence

Y -      You Shall Know Our Velocity is sitting on my side table to start once I finish my current read!

S - The Secret Keeper

A - The Artist's Way (I won't have finished it, but that's ok, I'm counting it anyway. :lol: )

N - Never Let Me Go

T - 

H - 

E - 

M - Men Without Women

U - 

M - 

 

I won't be finishing this in the next few days, most likely, lol.  But that's okay, February is Rose.  :lol:  So.  Overall I still think I'm doing pretty darn good! :D

You are definitely making progress. Using the first word is the hard way. ;) I am close to done but am using the first letter of any word in the title.

 

 

Mothersweets, I am so glad the wedding went well. Also it's just plain wonderful to hear that you love your dil for someone who is yet to experience those events. Does that make sense? I am also waiting for pictures! :)

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Am I the only one so far going for the Bertram Wooster?

 

 

 

And the final level is The Bertram Wooster. That is earned by reading one book set in England of any genre but failing spectacularly at all other challenges. A good attitude must be maintained despite numerous hardships. Employing a Gentleman’s Gentleman is optional but encouraged. Bonus points awarded if you are accidentally engaged multiple times during the year.

 

I do appreciate all the work done to create the challenges!  I'm sure I'll be perusing that Goodreads shelf often!  

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I've got too many books going simultaneously, and need to settle down and finish some. Besides unfinished books from last week, I'm reading Blaise Pascal's Pensees, excerpts from which Middle Girl will be discussing in her book group next week. This is the source of the famous Le coeur a ses raisons que la raison ne connait point ("The heart has its reasons of which reason know nothing."). The Pensees is a fascinating collection of snippets of writings which Pascal was preparing as the framework for a book, but he died before writing it. So the fragmentary, sometimes cryptic, nature of the Pensees ("Thoughts"; not Pascal's title) is accidental, and yet part of its attraction.

 

And then suddenly a copy of Dylan Thomas' short prose writings, the posthumous Quite Early in the Morning, leapt into my hands, and I couldn't resist starting it. What poetry this prose is. Reading the introduction, I realized that both Pascal and Thomas died at the age of 39. As did Flannery O'Connor.

 

Also, earlier in the week I read Tove "Moomintroll" Jansson's short novel The True Deceiver.

What did you think of True Deceiver?

 

--

 

My reading this week:

 

Continuing a reread of Kristen Lavransdatter Volume 1

Astrid Lindgren's Mio Min Mio (Mio, My Son)

 

Still pecking away at Arabian Nights and Lies My Teacher Told Me. I am tired of Lies My Teacher Told Me, but I am thankfully near the end.

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My son's wedding was last weekend - it was a lovely ceremony and everyone had a great time. I cried. He's my oldest son and the first of my children to be married. I'm thrilled with my daughter-in-law and think they will have a good life together. :) I'll post a picture as soon as we get them - one of my daughters did the photography for the wedding. 

 

Congratulations! I look forward to pictures. 

 

Amy!! I just found my next book.  There is a new John Pickett book available!  Mystery Loves Company(John Pickett #7).   https://www.amazon.com/Mystery-Loves-Company-Another-Pickett-ebook/dp/B0791LBT8Z/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1517204454&sr=1-1&keywords=mystery+loves+company and looks like it is set in London!

 

Oh, I thought she was ending the series. I'm glad to see it's continuing.

 

The Ian Rutledge series by Charles Todd, right? I think you and I both read three or four of those a few years ago and liked them but got a bit fed up with the lack of character development. Correct me if I'm misremembering. 

 

Test of Wills

 

 

 

 

 

 

That's it! The confusion comes from too many Charles -- Charles Todd the author, the Charles Lenox series by Charles Finch. And too add to the confusion I was thinking I had read the Ian Rankin books because of the character Ian Rutledge! 

 

And you remember correctly that we, and a few others here, I think, had enjoyed them well enough but gave up. That's why I was confused when you and Kathy were talking about Charles Lenox going to sea -- I was wondering why you both were still reading the series we had abandoned a couple of years ago.

 

You both made it farther than I did. I only read the first Ian Rutledge book and decided not to read any more. 

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It was full of wisdom. I kept feeling that I would be getting more out of it if I read it in the original ... Swedish? Finnish?

 

There's another one of hers I will read when my dear father-in-law is done with it.

Thanks. I read The Summer Book and have The Sculptor’s Daughter. What I also have, but have not read, are the Moomin books!

 

I’m pretty sure she wrote in Swedish and was part of the Swedish minority in Finland.

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Thank you everyone!!

 

Yay! I feel like I'm ahead now. :) So the next book I should read is supposed to be set in London, correct? Or can I just do whatever since I'm a rebel? 

 

 

Amy!! I just found my next book.  There is a new John Pickett book available!  Mystery Loves Company(John Pickett #7).   https://www.amazon.com/Mystery-Loves-Company-Another-Pickett-ebook/dp/B0791LBT8Z/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1517204454&sr=1-1&keywords=mystery+loves+company and looks like it is set in London!

 

Problem solved. That's prefect. Scotland Yard + London. :laugh:

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Just came home from the library with the first Charles Lenox title, A Beautiful Blue Death, and with a mystery set in Australia, Kittyhawk Down, an Inspector Hal Challis mystery. I scored at the library's used book store, too, with a couple of PD James titles and that western several of you read last year, The Sisters Brothers.

 

Now to have lunch and settle down with a book!

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Am I the only one so far going for the Bertram Wooster?

 

 

I do appreciate all the work done to create the challenges! I'm sure I'll be perusing that Goodreads shelf often!

I've just started popping in here recently to get ideas for books because I have had time to read lately. I love the Bertie Wooster level and laughed aloud.

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C -
H - Henrietta's War
R -  Winterdance: The Fine Madess of Running the Iditarod
Y - 
S - Stormy Petrel
A -
N -
T - Past Perfect, Present Tense
H - 
E - Editor-Proof Your Writing
M - The Scarlet Slipper Mystery
U - 
M - How to Manage Your Home Without Losing Your Mind

 

I'm not doing quite at well as Kara (Peaceful Chaos) with the flower challenge but I'm doing better than I expected! Off to look for a London book with a "U" in the title...

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I spent most of my free time today curled up with The Wild Sheep Chase https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/27224887-a-wild-sheep-chase which was supposed to be the end up my Murakami reading for the year. I knew that there was technically a forth book in what is know as The Rat Trilogy but fully expected to be able to ignore it.......but......I really loved The Wild Sheep Chase and it ended with a cliff hanger. I just checked out Dance, Dance, Dance on Overdrive.

 

I am still reading my Song of the Silk Road book for a Bingo Square. I don't like it and find it poorly written but I am too far to quit now.

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After not reading much for a while I have read a ton in the past month:

 

Some of these take place in Britain. I will put a (B) beside them.

(B) My Not-So-Perfect Life by Sophie Kinsella (very light, but good)

 

The Book Thief. It took me forever to read this because I had seen the movie and found it very similar.

 

Fates and Furies. By Lauren Groff. I didn't like it too much but I liked the way half of the book was told by the husband and half the wife.

 

Best Day Ever. By Kaira Rouda Not great but cleverly crafted.

 

A Thousand Splendid Suns Loved it, though very heavy!

 

A Man Called Ove. I just finished it today and I will miss all the characters from it. I can see this book becoming a very good movie if they got really good actors.

 

I hope to start Madame Bovary.

 

With DS11 I have been reading (B)Crispin, and (B)Treasure Island.

 

With DSs16, 14 I just finished The Golden Compass and have started The Subtle Knife -Love these!

We might read Sense and Sensibility soon.

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