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Katy

s/o coincidences - Mandela effect

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Really?  In the foil pan that puffs up as it cooks?  I'd love to find some, but they don't seem to sell it around here.  It was one of my grandmother's treats for us when I was little.

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Really? In the foil pan that puffs up as it cooks? I'd love to find some, but they don't seem to sell it around here. It was one of my grandmother's treats for us when I was little.

I see in our local store. You can buy it off Amazon

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No the cartoon was spelled Berenstain as well. If has always been Berenstain, although I remember it as Berenstein. The first time I heard about this I went to my parents house and looked at the same exact books that I had read a million times as a child. They all said Berenstain. I simply couldn't explain why I always thought Berenstein.

 

Because 'stein' is the correct Germanic spelling. I grew up in a neighborhood in a city in NL where all the streets ended in 'stein'. 'stain' would be Anglicized wrong or something. 

 

One of the things I love about Dutch is that for the most part we pronounce things as written, so there are fewer dilemmas like dilemma, which would be a pain to pronounce if it ended in mna. Likewise, we pronounce the p in psychologie, and the k in knie (meaning knee, and pronounced like knee, but with a k, etc). 

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Because 'stein' is the correct Germanic spelling. I grew up in a neighborhood in a city in NL where all the streets ended in 'stein'. 'stain' would be Anglicized wrong or something.

 

One of the things I love about Dutch is that for the most part we pronounce things as written, so there are fewer dilemmas like dilemma, which would be a pain to pronounce if it ended in mna. Likewise, we pronounce the p in psychologie, and the k in knie (meaning knee, and pronounced like knee, but with a k, etc).

Berenstain is the last name of the authors. And as a child I can't imagine coming across too many things spelled Stein. As an adult I understand that Stein is the more common spelling but as a kid I would have no conscious knowledge of that. Clearly, my brain processed it that way because it saw things spelled Stein rather than stain.

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Jiffy is also a brand of cheap baking mixes. 

 

I forgot, but I immediately pictured a box of corn bread when you said this, before clicking. We've bought it before, but I think with a different picture on the box.

 

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Ok this was driving me crazy so I googled how to say it... it does sound like an "E" to me so I don't think I would have guessed an "A" spelling even if I saw it on the books for a long time. I probably just ignored that. Inside the stories I don't know how often we see the last names. Mostly I remember "Mama Bear" "Brother Bear" etc. So it's possible to me that it was a on even older versions I had and that I just glossed over that. I might ask my mom what she recalls since she worked at a library when I was younger and we owned some of the books.

 

 

The Forrest Gump thing "Life is like a box..." vs "Life was like a box..." is weird, but also not totally unbelievable to me. I mean, the past tense doesn't make sense so I could see people "correcting" it to go with the dialogue.

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I forgot, but I immediately pictured a box of corn bread when you said this, before clicking. We've bought it before, but I think with a different picture on the box.

 

Mom made that sometimes, and we also used the cake mixes for our Easy-Bake Oven.

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What? Australia is closer to New Guinea than New Zealand?????

lol ... I live in Australia and I was still shocked when we first bought a globe to realise this. Geographical proximity and cultural similarity certainly aren't linked!

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lol ... I live in Australia and I was still shocked when we first bought a globe to realise this. Geographical proximity and cultural similarity certainly aren't linked!

 

Whatever world maps hung on the walls in my classes when we learned Geography must have been oddly warped!

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I was thinking about this... I think my ideas of where Australia & New Zealand are came from a 6th grade assignment where we had to color in a printed worksheet map in colored pencil.  Other (closer) islands weren't on the map, but Antarctica was.

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As for Seuss, you're all wrong:

"You’re wrong as the deuce

And you shouldn’t rejoice

If you’re calling him Seuss.

He pronounces it Soice (or Zoice)."

 

I'm mentally subbing this pronunciation in for the opening song of Seussical the Musical ... having a bunch of people sing-shouting "Soice Soice Soice Soice (beat beat) SOOOOOOIICE!" and, um, no. 

 

"'Cause this ain't Mother Goose ... when you think about Seuss"

 

Also, you get demerits for getting that song stuck in my head.

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I remember learning to spell dilemma as dilemna.

 

My husband also swears he learned dilemna. I didn't realize that it was widespread. I thought it was just a California thing, like how he says "wuf" for wolf.  :laugh:

 

Jiffy is also a brand of cheap baking mixes. 

 

 

I have "fond" memories of Jiffy muffins. Fake blueberries and you don't even get a full dozen muffins out of the box. "The food is bad--and the portions are so small!"

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I have an opposite of this effect. My sister was born right before a HUGE bitterly cold snow storm. VERY unusual for Portland, Oregon area. They were telling people to stay inside and not let children play outside. The whole area was closed for about a week (hey they don't know snow like here in the Northeast!). No one other then my family remembers that storm! I have talked to many people out there (before I moved in 1995, this storm was in 1989) and no one remembers it. 

 

If you were in the area my sister was born January 30, 1989 and this storm hit around February 1. 

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My husband also swears he learned dilemna. I didn't realize that it was widespread. I thought it was just a California thing, like how he says "wuf" for wolf. :laugh:

 

 

 

I have "fond" memories of Jiffy muffins. Fake blueberries and you don't even get a full dozen muffins out of the box. "The food is bad--and the portions are so small!"

I lived on Jiffy muffins in college. The fact that I haven't bought them in well over a decade is evidence of my improved baking skills. 😆

 

Add me to the Berenstein list. And I usually remember how to spell words based on how they look. I have to write difficult words out to know for sure. But Berenstain looks all wrong to me.

Edited by DesertBlossom
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I have an opposite of this effect. My sister was born right before a HUGE bitterly cold snow storm. VERY unusual for Portland, Oregon area. They were telling people to stay inside and not let children play outside. The whole area was closed for about a week (hey they don't know snow like here in the Northeast!). No one other then my family remembers that storm! I have talked to many people out there (before I moved in 1995, this storm was in 1989) and no one remembers it. 

 

If you were in the area my sister was born January 30, 1989 and this storm hit around February 1. 

 

Look on page 6! http://www.oregon.gov/LCD/HAZ/docs/3.ORNHMP12-WinterStorm.pdf

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That whole "The tub drain spins the other way in the southern hemisphere " thing.

 

Are you saying that's not true?

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That whole "The tub drain spins the other way in the southern hemisphere " thing.

 

The Coriolis Effect is a real thing, but it applies to storms and whirlpools. On little things like tubs and toilets and sinks whatever effect it has is neutralized by small imperfections in the device.

 

Not sure if you knew that or not, but this is a pet peeve of mine. Anybody could show it's wrong by simply observing how water drains in various tubs and sinks they encounter over the course of a week, but they never do and then they have the nerve to argue with you when you point out how easy it is to refute!

 

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Are you saying that's not true?

 

Not for your bathroom sink, no. It's true for storms. You can test this yourself - every time you use a sink or tub over the next few weeks, observe it and see which way it drains. You'll rapidly find that they don't all swirl the same way.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coriolis_force#Draining_in_bathtubs_and_toilets

 

Edited by Tanaqui
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That whole "The tub drain spins the other way in the southern hemisphere " thing.

 

That's not really an example of the Mandela effect, though. That's an example of a common misconception, something that people may have even been taught in school. It's not a case of a large group of people sharing a common incorrect memory. At least, it seemed different to me when I started typing this post, but now I'm confusing myself. :huh:

 

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I’m good with Berenstain bears because I always pronounced it “bear n stain.†Berenstein would be pronounced “bear n stine.†Or have I been pronouncing it incorrectly?

 

I think Jif and Skippy peanut butters are being conflated into Jiffy.

 

I could swear I was taught dilemna.

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Thank you! I knew it happened. My sister came home the day before the storm hit and my step mother at the time (not currently) had a strong resemblance to the step mother in Cinderella (at least character wise). She changed when her daughter was born so that storm was the beginning of the end of the marriage to my father and the beginning of the downward spiral my father went in to hit rock bottom of his drug an alcohol addiction. You can see why I would remember that storm so clearly. 

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I don't know if it's regional or not. According to my dictionary, it's just wrong. Could we really all be wrong about having learned it that way? Is there some other word that ends in "mna" and is pronounced "mma" that we might be confusing it with?

I recall saying the N with emphasis only for the purpose of spelling it right- dilemna 😜
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The Coriolis Effect thing was made common knowledge through The Simpsons, Australia, episode.

 

Signed,

Resident Simpsons Nerd.

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The weird thing about Berenstein/Berenstain is I had a friend when Ani was around 5 (2005ish) who actually pronounced it Bairn-steen Bears.  And while I knew she was wrong, I never corrected her because I was absolutely sure it was spelled Berenstein so I totally got why she'd pronounce it that way.

 

Side note about Berenstain Bears: The theme song on one DVD we have drives me nuts because it says they are just like people only more so.  How can you be more like a person than a person?!?!

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The Coriolis Effect thing was made common knowledge through The Simpsons, Australia, episode.

 

Signed,

Resident Simpsons Nerd.

 

I think I learned that on some Nickelodeon show as a kid.  Mr Wizard, or something like that?

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The Coriolis Effect thing was made common knowledge through The Simpsons, Australia, episode.

 

Signed,

Resident Simpsons Nerd.

I'm a Simpsons nerd as well.

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I learned dilemna, too, in the 1970s. I'm not sure when dilemma became standard.

 

Sent from my SM-S320VL using Tapatalk

 

di

lemma

 

It has always been standard. You can find that spelling as it transliterates directly from Greek to English.

 

https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/it-dilemma-or-dilemna

 

https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/85377/dilemma-vs-dilemna

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Re: dilemna--interestingly the mn spelling is also common (and considered erroneous) in French--dilemne instead of dilemme.

 

This site suggests that the mn spelling in French comes from the similarity of the word to the word indemne.

 

I find it very interesting that mn exists as a mistaken or alternate spelling in both languages and suspect there must be some other reason.

 

 

https://www.projet-voltaire.fr/regles-orthographe/dilemme-ou-dilemne/

 

 

https://fr.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/dilemne

Edited by maize

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So a bit more digging has uncovered that, while dilemna has always been a rare variant, it is attested in English writing as far back as the 1500's.

 

Some folks suggest it arose by analogy with silent n words such as hymn and solemn.

 

If so I suspect the error may have come to English through French as dilemme/dilemne ends with the "m" or "mn" sound whereas dilemma ends with the final "a" in English so is less obviously similar to mn words.

Edited by maize
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Has anyone else heard the word pronounced "dilemNa" because I'm pretty sure I remember that pronunciation from when I was young.

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I have an opposite of this effect. My sister was born right before a HUGE bitterly cold snow storm. VERY unusual for Portland, Oregon area. They were telling people to stay inside and not let children play outside. The whole area was closed for about a week (hey they don't know snow like here in the Northeast!). No one other then my family remembers that storm! I have talked to many people out there (before I moved in 1995, this storm was in 1989) and no one remembers it. 

 

If you were in the area my sister was born January 30, 1989 and this storm hit around February 1. 

 

I remember that storm.

 

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I was too. It's actually a thing If you google it. Many people were and no one knows why.

 

Oh, I learned it that way too!

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Ok, did this thread start because of an x-files episode? Cause I'm up too late watching one of the new ones and it is all about this phenomenon. 

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I swear that a mislabeled crayons in my youth led me to believe that chartreuse is purple.

This is a common Mandela effect one.

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The latest X-Files made me appreciate this thread so much more. 

If you haven't seen it, The Lost Art of Forehead Sweat, it's classic X-Files. We were cracking up. 

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So odd to me that it is called the Mandela effect.  I was always aware of Nelson Mandela and whether he was alive or dead......

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I swear that a mislabeled crayons in my youth led me to believe that chartreuse is purple.

 

 

The latest X-Files made me appreciate this thread so much more. 

If you haven't seen it, The Lost Art of Forehead Sweat, it's classic X-Files. We were cracking up. 

 

 

Speaking of colors...and the X-files.....I remember clearly the episode where the painter used the term cerulean blue. 

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Ok, did this thread start because of an x-files episode? Cause I'm up too late watching one of the new ones and it is all about this phenomenon. 

 

Nope, it's just what I labeled it as - something in the coincidence thread reminded me of this.  I have only seen the first couple episodes of the new x-files, but I'll go see if I can find it.

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I swear that a mislabeled crayons in my youth led me to believe that chartreuse is purple.

I didn't realize I got this from crayons, but I Always thought chartreuse was purple. One of my kids had on a lime green shirt one day and my mil said it was chartreuse and I'm thinking what? Then I googled it and chartreuse is green.

 

My favorite one is everyone remembering Luke, I am your father from star wars.

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I didn't realize I got this from crayons, but I Always thought chartreuse was purple. One of my kids had on a lime green shirt one day and my mil said it was chartreuse and I'm thinking what? Then I googled it and chartreuse is green.

 

My favorite one is everyone remembering Luke, I am your father from star wars.

 

I'm convinced the Luke, I am your father came from spoofs.  Like the Muppet Babies cartoon.

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