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lizbusby

Handwriting Work with 9yo

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I have a 9yo DS in the public gifted program who was recently diagnosed with dysgraphia among other things. It's mostly a lack of fine motor control from going on writing/drawing strike for 3 years when little. I am hoping to homeschool some handwriting practice over the summer break. Does anyone have experience/suggestions with what to do when teaching handwriting/letter formation to an older, bright kid? Is Handwriting without Tears the way to go?

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I have a 9yo DS in the public gifted program who was recently diagnosed with dysgraphia among other things. It's mostly a lack of fine motor control from going on writing/drawing strike for 3 years when little. I am hoping to homeschool some handwriting practice over the summer break. Does anyone have experience/suggestions with what to do when teaching handwriting/letter formation to an older, bright kid? Is Handwriting without Tears the way to go?

Handwriting without Tears would be good. Peterson Directed handwriting would also be good.

 

I just wanted to say I think you have something backwards. You said the dysgraphia is mostly from going on a writing strike for 3 years. It is much much more likely that he went on a writing strike because of the dysgraphia.

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Handwriting without Tears would be good. Peterson Directed handwriting would also be good.

 

I just wanted to say I think you have something backwards. You said the dysgraphia is mostly from going on a writing strike for 3 years. It is much much more likely that he went on a writing strike because of the dysgraphia.

Yes this.

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I strongly endorse Getty and dubay it is far more natural and fluent than HWT. It is the 4th program we tried for my son and it produced far more fluid and legible handwriting. The cursive is very easy its just jpined print ans highly legible. Also have him practace writing on a chalkboard or whiteboard on the wall it strengthens the muscles.

 

Make sure the grip is good. As my son improved we he learned to write more with his shoulder and arm than just his fingers. Do a Google search I got the idea from a calipraphy handwriting page it is far less fatiguing and helps with automaticity.

Edited by exercise_guru
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We used Peterson directed to get the point across that we aren't drawing the letters like artwork, but flowing and certain muscles are being used.

The style of print however, is not something my dc could consistently produce, so we switched to a simplified Zaner-Bloser with Essential Learning Products materials. That series talks directly to the older student, and emphasized legibility over perfection.  It worked.  A fat pen or pencil grips are helpful too, you must experiment a big to get something that works. Also make sure the student's vision is good.  Experiment, the OT told me many do better starting with cursive and ditching print...my kid didn't want to ditch print, but his cursive does look a lot better and it is a lot easier for him than print.

 

 

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Can I suggest typing instead or in addition to? No matter how hard we tried, my younger boy's handwriting was always a road block to expressing himself (he is gifted). We finally abandoned all handwriting at age 12, and he *only* types - including notes, outlines, papers, etc. He does write math, but types out any explanation type answers. What does the school suggest? With a dysgraphia diagnosis it is reasonable to expect accommodations including the use of a computer for tests.

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