Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

Moxie

False missile warning in Hawaii

Recommended Posts

Google your favorite news source.

 

WTH do you do if you are watching tv and the voice comes on “there is an inbound missile expected to reach land, this is not a drillâ€. How terrifying!

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, my inlaws are in Hawaii... They were supposed to take off to go to the big island, and the airport shut down for a little while. Apparently it was a false alarm. But this is the world we live in I suppose... :(

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of my kids, my parents, and my grandmother are there now. I'm glad I don't watch the news!! I think I'd have a heart attack, my blood pressure is already so high and this would have sent me over the edge.  :eek:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My brother and his wife are visiting there right now and were just telling us this story! Everyone’s phones in their group just started beeping at the same time. They got all panicked and went outside and thought they heard fighter jets. They couldn’t figure out where to go or what to do though and they couldn’t find anything online. They are back to relaxing at the beach now though [emoji4]

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Edited by highspirits
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We’re in Kauai and were on our way to see Tunnels Beach. Weren’t expecting that sort of message!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just finished watching approximately 10 minutes of coverage about this incident on the TV news from the USA.  One problem was that apparently one (1) person was able to send out the Alert. It should take some verification...  The next problem was that it said that it was not a False Alarm. The next problem was that it took them about 30 minutes to send out messages that it was a mistake.  A total failure of the State of Hawaii Emergency Management.  The other issue, hopefully will never happen. They only have 20 minutes, from Launch to Impact. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't imagine how I would react to that. I know it wouldn't be pretty! I'd be freaking out while finding a basement or something.  :willy_nilly:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We’re visiting Hawaii at the moment and to tell you the truth, thinking now about an earthquake happening in Seattle is more stressful to me. Isn’t that weird?

 

The State of Hawaii’s emergency system has a big problem to fix, that’s for sure. Trust is hard to recover.

 

My high school’s fire alarm system was broken for a week and it kept sounding off 3-4 times a day. It trained us not to believe it—and it took a lot to get us to leave our chairs during an alarm —long past the time after the system was repaired.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It would take me several pina coladas to recover.

 

Seriously, terrifying.

 

Hang on, we'd be in Hawaii.  Make that several Mai Tais instead of Pina Coladas.  ;)

 

If nothing else, it's a good excuse to have them. 

 

I have no idea how I'd have reacted TBH.  It takes a lot to unnerve me.  Considering we're talking nuclear we might have just pulled out chairs to sit on the beach and watch.  If something nuclear really were to get set off by some idiot or another, ground zero isn't that bad of a spot to be (better than dying of radiation poisoning or nuclear winter).  Whether the beach would have been ground zero or not would be impossible for minions to figure out though.  So yeah, in retrospect, a Mai Tai or two would be enjoyed.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just heard about this and was coming here to post.

 

Terrifying. And unbelievable.

 

And hopefully this is a wake up call to state officials and they can fix it before/if an actual warning is need

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I am not in Hawaii but reading threads and news stories online was enough to get me to bite the bullet and order those emergency backpacks I've been meaning to order because I am too disorganized and overextended to make my own emergency backpacks.

 

I'm also ordering big water bottles. Not because of missiles but I just remembered we don't have proper emergency supplies in our home. :P

 

We're probably dead but who knows, someone might survive and find the stash later.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hang on, we'd be in Hawaii. Make that several Mai Tais instead of Pina Coladas. ;)

 

If nothing else, it's a good excuse to have them.

 

I have no idea how I'd have reacted TBH. It takes a lot to unnerve me. Considering we're talking nuclear we might have just pulled out chairs to sit on the beach and watch. If something nuclear really were to get set off by some idiot or another, ground zero isn't that bad of a spot to be (better than dying of radiation poisoning or nuclear winter). Whether the beach would have been ground zero or not would be impossible for minions to figure out though. So yeah, in retrospect, a Mai Tai or two would be enjoyed.

Mai Tais it is then! Cheers!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yikes.

 

I thought it was bad when I was dispatching, we were moving furniture in the middle of the night, and my coworker bumped the tornado siren button.  It was funny later (and because I didn't do it).  This is a smidge worse, to put it mildly.

Edited by BarbecueMom
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What I don't understand with this, is why it took them so long to correct.  

 

I get that it seems to have been an accidental button push, but wouldn't the person almost immediately have said "expletive" and started to fix it?  Or even if they didn't notice, wouldn't the phones have started lighting up and they would have realized the error right away?

 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I am not in Hawaii but reading threads and news stories online was enough to get me to bite the bullet and order those emergency backpacks I've been meaning to order because I am too disorganized and overextended to make my own emergency backpacks.

 

I'm also ordering big water bottles. Not because of missiles but I just remembered we don't have proper emergency supplies in our home. :p

 

We're probably dead but who knows, someone might survive and find the stash later.

 

Don't forget iosat (if it's isn't included in the emergency backpacks); it's so cheap and small to store that you might consider having extra on hand, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scary! But I’d rather have a false alarm than a real attack and no warning, I suppose. They really need to fix that and make it less vulnerable to user error

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok so my DH totally thinks this was rigged to be a test to see how people respond and to get them prepared. He isn’t buying the wrong button theory 😂

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok so my DH totally thinks this was rigged to be a test to see how people respond and to get them prepared. He isn’t buying the wrong button theory 😂

This is my thought as well.  

 

OR.....someone leaked that that there was an actual missle coming just to screw with people....or to check for a mole. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My home country (277.6 mi² in size) has bomb shelters built by the current government and we had bomb shelter drills. The bomb sirens would blast. My parents were born in Asia, but not Japan, before Hiroshima and Nagasaki were bombed. My relatives and I grew up knowing that bombs are a possibility due to the political turbulence in Asia.

 

Business Insider science section 2014 article Where To Hide If A Nuclear Bomb Is Dropped On Your City http://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-survive-a-nuclear-blast-2014-1

Edited by Arcadia
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't forget iosat (if it's isn't included in the emergency backpacks); it's so cheap and small to store that you might consider having extra on hand, too.

What is iosat? Iodine pills or something?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What I don't understand with this, is why it took them so long to correct.

 

I get that it seems to have been an accidental button push, but wouldn't the person almost immediately have said "expletive" and started to fix it? Or even if they didn't notice, wouldn't the phones have started lighting up and they would have realized the error right away?

 

 

I know right?! Is it harder to send a correction. Or did they not realise they sent the message?

 

Is there any possibility/ likelihood that there was something underlying the whole false alarm thing? That sounds pretty much too far fetched but.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They knew within minutes. The thing is, a bureaucracy will always take longer to decide what to do because the process becomes more important than the results.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

My high school’s fire alarm system was broken for a week and it kept sounding off 3-4 times a day. It trained us not to believe it—and it took a lot to get us to leave our chairs during an alarm —long past the time after the system was repaired.

That is a storyline in a tv show I used to watch... then during the year end dance the alarms were going off and no one was taking it seriously but there was a fire. Everyone did get out safely however (the explosion in the boiler room speeded people up....) but the school burned down.

 

But Yes, it is hard not to ignore after a while.

 

Sent from my SM-G903W using Tapatalk

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know right?! Is it harder to send a correction. Or did they not realise they sent the message.

From the press conference, my understanding was that they had never considered the possibility of a false alarm, so didn’t have a correction/false alarm message ready to go. They had to manually program one for the system to send, and it sounds like that was a big part of the delay. They are now remedying that, of course.
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the press conference, my understanding was that they had never considered the possibility of a false alarm, so didn’t have a correction/false alarm message ready to go. They had to manually program one for the system to send, and it sounds like that was a big part of the delay. They are now remedying that, of course.

 

How hard can that be?  Wouldn't you just type the new message in?  I mean, they must have ways to send out novel messages, wouldn't they?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok so my DH totally thinks this was rigged to be a test to see how people respond and to get them prepared. He isn’t buying the wrong button theory 😂

 

While I can't resist entertaining a few theories, I sure as bleep hope that one is way off.  Whatever reaction people had this time is going to be colored with "Maybe it's a mistake" if it ever goes off again.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How hard can that be?  Wouldn't you just type the new message in?  I mean, they must have ways to send out novel messages, wouldn't they?

 

Depending on the system, they might have had to go get the person who maintained the application that ran the automation and type it in there.

 

In addition, they have to craft the message and get approval from people all the way up.

 

Then you have to send a test message to ensure that sending the new message, with the change to the application, is going to work.

 

Then you can send the message.

 

This is even in an extremely low-bureaucracy environment. I would say that if you asked my team to do the same thing, and we have like zero overhead, if it was unexpected and the application developer were not there, 30 minutes would be considered a very fast response time. If you had the application developer / maintenance on site all the time for that very purpose (extremely expensive), maybe 15 minutes, provided you had a message approved within 5?

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depending on the system, they might have had to go get the person who maintained the application that ran the automation and type it in there.

 

In addition, they have to craft the message and get approval from people all the way up.

 

Then you have to send a test message to ensure that sending the new message, with the change to the application, is going to work.

 

Then you can send the message.

 

This is even in an extremely low-bureaucracy environment. I would say that if you asked my team to do the same thing, and we have like zero overhead, if it was unexpected and the application developer were not there, 30 minutes would be considered a very fast response time. If you had the application developer / maintenance on site all the time for that very purpose (extremely expensive), maybe 15 minutes, provided you had a message approved within 5?

 

I guess what I'm saying is that, where I live, I get all sorts of alerts on my phone that are obviously not preprogrammed.  X elementary school is closed due to a power outage.  A water mane broke a Y Ave and Z streets, so please take alternate routes. Amber Alert with a description of the car and the license plate etc . . . 

 

So, it seems odd that there was no way to get out a correction message, and if they couldn't send it via the original system, you'd think they'd have some way to contact people who have alternate systems, and get emails out.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok so my DH totally thinks this was rigged to be a test to see how people respond and to get them prepared. He isn’t buying the wrong button theory 😂

 

This possibility came up in our discussion too.

 

I hadn't thought of the mole theory Tap mentioned, but I could see that too.

 

Both seem to fit the actual scene better than "we didn't know how to correct it."  Duh, send the police out on the streets with bullhorns if you literally can't do anything else.  This is not a difficult problem to try to correct and any thinking person would want to correct it ASAP before folks died panicking. Is the place loaded with dumb people or was there something else?

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess what I'm saying is that, where I live, I get all sorts of alerts on my phone that are obviously not preprogrammed.  X elementary school is closed due to a power outage.  A water mane broke a Y Ave and Z streets, so please take alternate routes. Amber Alert with a description of the car and the license plate etc . . . 

 

So, it seems odd that there was no way to get out a correction message, and if they couldn't send it via the original system, you'd think they'd have some way to contact people who have alternate systems, and get emails out.  

 

I don't really want to make jokes out of a situation that I truly do find upsetting but...

 

This is probably the only situation in which I'd actually appreciate a group text!  :tongue_smilie:

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess what I'm saying is that, where I live, I get all sorts of alerts on my phone that are obviously not preprogrammed. X elementary school is closed due to a power outage. A water mane broke a Y Ave and Z streets, so please take alternate routes. Amber Alert with a description of the car and the license plate etc . . .

 

So, it seems odd that there was no way to get out a correction message, and if they couldn't send it via the original system, you'd think they'd have some way to contact people who have alternate systems, and get emails out.

But you have no idea how long it took to get that message ready from the time it was conceived. Additionally, there are already processes and programs in place to send these types of messages. It’s likely approved templates already exist and the people who send them are just “filling in the blanks†so to speak.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But you have no idea how long it took to get that message ready from the time it was conceived. Additionally, there are already processes and programs in place to send these types of messages. It’s likely approved templates already exist and the people who send them are just “filling in the blanks†so to speak.

Right. And “template†was the term used in the press conference. They said they didn’t have a template ready for sending a correction, and that was an oversight on their part, and now they will. I can’t recall when this system went live, but it hasn’t been very long, so I can see how some things could have been overlooked. Obviously, this was a huge, terrible error, but I do see how it could have happened this way.
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They knew within minutes. The thing is, a bureaucracy will always take longer to decide what to do because the process becomes more important than the results.

This is very likely why it took so long to send out the second message. My husband works for the federal government. It’s ridiculous how things are run at times. Procedure take precedence.

 

Years ago, he was part of a team that identified nuclear fallout shelters throughout the US, so at least he knows what to look for and the odds of survival.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Years ago, he was part of a team that identified nuclear fallout shelters throughout the US, so at least he knows what to look for and the odds of survival.

 

It's not really so difficult to survive the blast unless one is literally at Ground Zero.  The "trick" comes in being able to survive the aftermath.

 

Three decades ago I worked on some of those calculations... doubt much has changed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not really so difficult to survive the blast unless one is literally at Ground Zero.  The "trick" comes in being able to survive the aftermath.

 

Three decades ago I worked on some of those calculations... doubt much has changed.

 

The CDC postponed its plans for updated public education, but I printed their published recommendations a few months back.  ;)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is iosat? Iodine pills or something?

Potassium Iodide pills.

 

From Scientific American Does Potassium Iodide Protect People from Radiation Leaks? https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/japan-earthquake-tsunami-radiation/

“Why is potassium iodide administered to people who have been exposed to radioactive iodine?

The thyroid is like a sponge for iodine. It's been known from the 1970s that if you administer normal iodine the thyroid will absorb it and then block the uptake of subsequent exposures to radioactive iodine. Therefore, if you take potassium iodide and then are exposed to radioactive iodine, there won't be any place for it to go because your thyroid is all filled and the radioactive material will be excreted from the body.

 

One pill is good for 24 hours, but then you have to take another pill. You don't take two pills at once, because having too much potassium iodide isn't good for you either. Like anything else, it's not 100 percent effective, but it appears to be quite a benign thing to take, and it does block the uptake of radioactive iodine.

 

Is thyroid cancer the foremost risk when radioactive iodine is in the air?

With regard to radioactive iodine, it's just the thyroid gland that you're worried about; you're not concerned about anything else. Of course, in an event like Chernobyl where the reactor's containment vessel did not hold everything a number of other radioactive elements were also released, including cesium and strontium as well as some of the reactor fuel—the uraniums and plutoniums. Still, the two main elements of concern from a radiation leak would be radioactive iodine and cesium, [the latter of] which has a half-life of 30 years, so it stays around for a little while.

 

Would potassium iodide protect a person from other forms of cancer?

No, this is unique. These potassium iodide pills are not magic pills. They protect against thyroid cancer but they don't protect you against other possible cancers.

 

Assuming there is more than radioactive iodine in the air, what can people do to protect themselves?

There is no protective agent against other cancers. The protective measures are to evacuate, get as far away from the radiation exposure as you can so that your dose is much lower. Stay inside, don't go out and breathe contaminated air. If you do get some exposure to radioactive elements, take a shower and wash them off immediately.â€

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok so my DH totally thinks this was rigged to be a test to see how people respond and to get them prepared. He isn’t buying the wrong button theory 😂

 

My DH thinks the gov't is covering something up. That, in fact, something did happen, but they dealt w/ it and then acted all, "false alarm! Our bad!"

 

I'm Team I Have No Idea What Happened. (But for something that's been in place for decades with nothing happening, it feels odd that all of a sudden. . . it happens.)

 

Alley

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thing is, as far as staying indoors goes, yeah there are Some building that are really “enclosedâ€. But the places we stay have windows that are always open a little bit, doors that have between 1/8†to 1/4†of light showing around them ... “indoors†is a term I would use loosely in Hawaii.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My DH thinks the gov't is covering something up. That, in fact, something did happen, but they dealt w/ it and then acted all, "false alarm! Our bad!"

 

I'm Team I Have No Idea What Happened. (But for something that's been in place for decades with nothing happening, it feels odd that all of a sudden. . . it happens.)

 

Alley

 

But what would be keeping all the other countries quiet about it?  We're not the only ones who would know of a launch.

 

The only possible theories I could get behind are a leak to test to see if there's a mole or someone thinking a test of the system to see what people would do is a good idea.

 

Or, it could have just been a mistake with a bunch of clueless people having no idea how to correct it in a timely manner.

 

Any of those three would fit.  A covered up actual launch doesn't.  Countries don't keep secrets together all that well.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But what would be keeping all the other countries quiet about it?  We're not the only ones who would know of a launch.

 

 

Well, dh is saying that if North Korea's missiles are neutralized. . . they might have completely lost face and won't want to crow about it. Like, they'd be thinking, "if the U.S. (or China?) can shut us down that quickly we're in worst shape than we thought."

 

And they wouldn't want to tell the world about how lame they are.

 

This is from DH.

 

Alley

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...