Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

Moxie

Do I need to get over this?? Thinking out loud

Recommended Posts

I can have, um, strong opinions ☺ï¸.

 

One of them is about MLM organizations. I dislike them. I think they prey on desperate people and I hate the idea that “friends and family are your first customersâ€.

 

But I love Thirty One products. I love organizing. My kids are all in school so I need *something* but a job with a schedule won’t work for our family. Maybe this is what I’ve been looking for? But, man, I hate the idea of being in an MLM. But maybe I’m just stubborn??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, because even if you like Thirty One, it’s still all of the things you dislike.

 

What about building up a business of your own related to organizing. More work up front and still no guarantee of success, but certainly none of the MLM pitfalls.

  • Like 20

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even if you like the product, you will still be preying on unsuspecting friends and family, right?

 

If that’s your big reason for disliking MLMs, I’m not sure why the product would make a difference. Theoretically, you would still be uncomfortable approaching friends and family.

  • Like 15

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't do it.  Don't be that person who says "I always hated MLM but I really believe in this product!"  I roll my eyes so hard when I get hit up with that sales pitch.  

 

It's always a SAHM looking for an easy job -- no boss-- no set hours--- maximum flexibility.  Always.  Using our mutual friendship to try to get my money so she'll have more money. 

Then often comes the guilt inducing messages, 'I don't understand why people go to stores instead of supporting their friends who are supporting a family!  '  As though buying from you is a fundraiser to support a good cause.  The cause being:  you have more money while having an easy work from home job, I guess?
 

 

Whew.  Didn't know how irritated I was until just now.

  • Like 37

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even if you like the product, you will still be preying on unsuspecting friends and family, right?

 

If that’s your big reason for disliking MLMs, I’m not sure why the product would make a difference. Theoretically, you would still be uncomfortable approaching friends and family.

Yep, you're still hawking a product and likely have a sales quota to meet.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't do it.  Would you be required to pre-purchase a bunch of stock?  I see so many postings on FB from those trying to get rid of their Lularoe  (sp?) stock.  Someone I know said that they've had an impossible time trying to return or sell thousands of dollars of stock.  I don't see anyone wearing them anymore either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have mixed feelings about that.  I mean, a lot of businesses (most?) are about making money as their goal, and trying to convince the customer that they're worth it and are a really good product.  I think it depends on how you handle it, and maybe some companies are better (or worse) at this than others.  I image that most retail industries have a quota they're trying to meet, and think of car salesmen!

 

A son of a friend of mine called me one day and asked how the family was, etc. etc., and then at the very end said he wanted to invite me to a special event but didn't even say what it was.  I insisted he tell me before he hung up, and was finally able to get out of him that it was for an MLM company.  (As I had guessed.)  I didn't like his approach, and I didn't go.

 

Another friend of mine sells 31 bags.  She posts on Facebook now and then when she's having an event, but has never, ever put pressure on me to attend.  I ended up going once to support her, bought a tote, and love it.  I use it all the time.  She has never specifically invited me to anything, and has never even brought it up with me again.  In fact, I don't even know how she makes money with it, but I know she does.

 

So I think how she handles it is fine.  Granted, I know nothing about the company itself, but it seems okay to me.  

 

As long as it's handled decently and honestly, isn't it not too much different than a lot of other types of businesses?

 

I've also gone to Pampered Chef parties, but then maybe I have a different perspective on these since I live in a small town in the middle of the prairie, and sometimes there is absolutely nothing else to do on a cold winter's evening.   :)

 

I'm not saying I always support MLM companies...  I don't, and I probably would never do it myself.  But I don't think we should necessarily assume they're all the same. 

 

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't. I have a friend who said exactly the same thing. Hates MLM, loves organizing, started a Thirty One "business" and now she's just as annoying as all the other MLM moms.

 

Start a real business helping people get organized, don't turn into a MLM zombie gushing about how much you love your <insert product of the month here>.

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know several people (all stay home moms) trying to earn money this way. Some of them are aggressive and annoying, some aren't. But none of them are actually making any money, and some have lost money. And lost friends.

  • Like 11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can use their products without being their consultant. Go into business for yourself in organizing, and use whatever products work best for you. My guess is that over time those products might change and evolve and you'll be grateful that you didn't commit yourself in that way.

 

I think the 31 folks are required to post a certain amount of times on social media and send a certain number of emails.  I say this because one of my FB friends does it.  That would drive me crazy. 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've recently unfollowed several acquaintances on Facebook because of their MLM affiliations. Did they try and sell something to me? Nope. But they posted relentlessly about their products and how great they are and on and on. Not interested in that -- I'm Facebook friends because I want to see kid/pet pics and memes and your fave recipes. Not never ending product placement.

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love organizing too, and love some Thirty-One products for portable organizing, like in the back of the car. But I really do not like their soft-sided “organizers†to be of much use in the house, at all.

 

If you want to help people get organized, hawking more “stuff†that may or may not work for them is not the way.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My honest opinion. I think it’s only annoying if you’re overly pushy. I live in a very rural area & there are SO many people here that sell things at house parties... 31 bags, Tastefully Simple, Pampered Chef, Mary Kay, some nail art thing I can’t even remember, Origami Owl jewelry.. it just goes on and on.

 

I don’t mind being invited to these parties. They’re usually pretty fun & I get a night out with friends and free food. If I go, I do usually anticipate that I’ll buy something, even if it’s very small. If money is tight or I’m just not interested, I politely decline. I’ve never had friends here be pushy & I don’t mind that they’re looking for ways to make extra income for their family.

 

Having said that, when I was much younger a new friend at church offered to give me a facial. Yay! Right? I’m assuming she’s an actual aesthetician. Um, no. She sold Mary Kay. She put make-up on HALF of my face. I told her I can’t wear foundation, and that my skin was incredibly sensitive. She applied it anyway...to HALF of my face. It was awkward. I hated it. The friendship ceased to exist, and I learned free facials don’t exist, lol.

 

All that to say, if you decide to do it, have fun and treat people how you would want to be treated 😊

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what is MLM?

 

multi-level marketing. 

 

er: amway, avon, mary kay, reliv, advocare . . . .

 

someone who sells - recruits people to sell for them.  they get a commission on what they sell PLUS a commission on what those they recruit sell.  so, the more people they recruit to sell, (and they more those people sell) -- the more money they make.  they people at the top, can make a lot.  most people, don't make much, and some don't even meet their expenses with the products.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd never heard of them.

cute - but I would never use them because I consider them more cutsey than practical.

 

they remind me of vera bradley - except I prefer the VB (sold in stores) - and I don't even like VB.

 

eta: I would start a business organizing- you then have the freedom to pick and choose what products you use to fit a particular situation.  you get a more tailored approach, and likely a happier customer who is more likely to tell their friends about your services.

Edited by gardenmom5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think if you do this, you should put all your reservations on a big piece of paper and post it over your desk or on your closet door or somewhere else where you will see it often.  And then you should gut check yourself every so often and make sure that you're sticking with your principles.  Because if you lose your principles, you have nothing.

 

I did that when I started my own business, and it has really served me well.

 

I have seen people corrupted by the desire for business success in every environment possible--corporate, MLM, small business, whatever.  And I have seen people refuse to allow themselves to be so corrupted.

 

My great-grandfather was known as 'Honest John' because he had a thriving ships' chandler business in a raucous, dishonest environment.  He stood out because he was honest.  My grandfather (his son-in-law) sold suits for a living, and also stood out because he would tell men if they didn't look right.  He also stood out because he was honest and not pushy.  These are good examples to have.  Who are yours?  Be the change you want to see.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you thought about being a substitute teacher or teachers aide?  It isn't great money but is super flexible and follows the school schedule for the kids.  Right now I can work almost 5 days a week if I wanted but can also take an entire week off if I want.  A few of the ladies only sub on  a certain day of the week or just 2 days a week.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would never do it. Just my opinion, but I would feel rude and tacky trying to make money off of friends and family.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you like products, buy products.

 

If you want to be a salesperson in a high-risk / low-reward system... sign up to sell products.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PS  I do like 31 products, although the quality varies from one to another.

I took a big tote on a trip last year, and the zipper failed immediately and catastrophically for no reason.

 

I think it's valid to sign up to be a distributor mostly to get stuff at wholesale for yourself.  Not all companies make this easy or even possible.

 

The other MLM companies that I actually like are CAbI (except they don't carry size 2X so they are useless to me now), Amway for some cleaning products (rarely), Pampered Chef, and Lila Rose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

multi-level marketing.

 

er: amway, avon, mary kay, reliv, advocare . . . .

 

someone who sells - recruits people to sell for them. they get a commission on what they sell PLUS a commission on what those they recruit sell. so, the more people they recruit to sell, (and they more those people sell) -- the more money they make. they people at the top, can make a lot. most people, don't make much, and some don't even meet their expenses with the products.

oh ok. I was thinking it was a specific and I couldn't figure out what it was.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have 2 friends who manage not to be annoying about their mlm. Neither needs the money to survive. It’s a side gig that brings in a little extra vacation money. They rarely post anything on social media. Maybe twice a year putting together a catalog order. One sells Thirty-one and the other sells Norwex. The 31 gal- I went over to her house 3 or 4 times before I asked her what 31 was because she always had piles of boxes in her entry. She was like, “oh it’s this thing that I sell.†I had to ask her for more details. She was so determined to never sales pitch anyone.

 

So it can definitely be done.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know a couple of people who sell norwex. One is a bit gushy and annoying but the other just does it for social contact and get free stuff. The second is not doing it to make money but the first probably is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The thing that I think is most insidious about MLMs and social media is the way it corrupts normal interaction. I don't feel like I can respond the way I normally would to a friend's day-in-the-life post when the post is also promoting her business.

 

An example: A friend who sells skin care products posts about how when she's on vacation she doesn't do her full skin care routine, instead she uses a five step mini regimine. If she wasn't selling the stuff I would comment that that's four steps more than my usual routine. Or my cousin who sells essential oils starts a discussion about good bedtime routines for toddlers, but she doesn't really want to discuss bedtime routines, she just wants to plug her bedtime oil mix.

 

The sellers' posts are fake (the same stock phrases show up in every seller's post no matter what the product) and their friend's posts are constrained by not wanting to hurt the "business."

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't like MLM either and I rarely attend any party. I do love most pampered chef stuff and oddly enough I found myself wondering how I could have a party without weirding put my friends.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can use their products without being their consultant. Go into business for yourself in organizing, and use whatever products work best for you. My guess is that over time those products might change and evolve and you'll be grateful that you didn't commit yourself in that way.

 

I think the 31 folks are required to post a certain amount of times on social media and send a certain number of emails. I say this because one of my FB friends does it. That would drive me crazy.

Actually it’s against 31 Gifts rules to post on social media. You can have a private group but not spam people or post it on your personal page.

I join every couple years when they have a nice kit. I don’t actually sell it and let them deactivate me eventually, and then buy another kit a year or so later when it has things I want in it. For $99 I get some nice 31 things and then just let it deactivate when I don’t sell anything. I do buy myself during that time using my 25% discount.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd say don't do it. I absolutely love Usborne books and almost fell prey to signing up. Thankfully I realized that it doesn't matter that I love them, I'd still be marketing to friends and family who may not. Most people involved in an MLM probably love what they sell. But that doesn't mean everyone who knows them will or wants to hear about it. Just say no to MLM!

Edited by Whovian10
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually it’s against 31 Gifts rules to post on social media. You can have a private group but not spam people or post it on your personal page.

Judging by my Facebook feed there must be an exception for "I'm so excited to take my 31 Gifts stash to [insert event] this weekend!" and "Here's a cute picture of my toddler sitting in my new [style name] tote!" And, of course, "Let's support each other this holiday season! If you have a small business, link to it in the comments! I sell 31 Gifts!"

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't do it. Don't be that person who says "I always hated MLM but I really believe in this product!" I roll my eyes so hard when I get hit up with that sales pitch.

 

It's always a SAHM looking for an easy job -- no boss-- no set hours--- maximum flexibility. Always. Using our mutual friendship to try to get my money so she'll have more money.

Then often comes the guilt inducing messages, 'I don't understand why people go to stores instead of supporting their friends who are supporting a family! ' As though buying from you is a fundraiser to support a good cause. The cause being: you have more money while having an easy work from home job, I guess?

 

 

Whew. Didn't know how irritated I was until just now.

QFT.

 

Don’t do it. Become a professional organizer. Heck, become a PT file clerk at a big office where they just turn you loose in the file room and let you organize your ass off. But don’t depend on shaking your friends like a money tree for bread. You’ll hate yourself in the morning.

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you thought about being a substitute teacher or teachers aide?  It isn't great money but is super flexible and follows the school schedule for the kids.  Right now I can work almost 5 days a week if I wanted but can also take an entire week off if I want.  A few of the ladies only sub on  a certain day of the week or just 2 days a week.

 

That's what I do but I'm hoping to get a full-time job next school year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't do it.  Don't be that person who says "I always hated MLM but I really believe in this product!"  I roll my eyes so hard when I get hit up with that sales pitch.  

 

It's always a SAHM looking for an easy job -- no boss-- no set hours--- maximum flexibility.  Always.  Using our mutual friendship to try to get my money so she'll have more money. 

Then often comes the guilt inducing messages, 'I don't understand why people go to stores instead of supporting their friends who are supporting a family!  '  As though buying from you is a fundraiser to support a good cause.  The cause being:  you have more money while having an easy work from home job, I guess?

 

 

Whew.  Didn't know how irritated I was until just now.

 

Well, this said it all.  I was going to post an irritated diatribe but now I don't need to :)

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know a woman who just started a home organization business. She meets with clients, discusses their needs/desires, shops for organization stuff, sets up their rooms, returns any stuff the client ended up not wanting.

 

It's just getting off its feet but going good so far.

Edited by maize
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, adding this:  For the younger generation, Thirty One has been a fad for quite some time, so most have BTDT . . . and already have a bag if they're interested. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

QFT.

 

Don’t do it. Become a professional organizer. Heck, become a PT file clerk at a big office where they just turn you loose in the file room and let you organize your ass off. But don’t depend on shaking your friends like a money tree for bread. You’ll hate yourself in the morning.

 

your friend's will be sick of you in the morning too.

 

besides - once a mlm person has shaken-down all their friends, they have to find new people to host parties for them.   the only people who can truly be successful in MLM are perky extroverts who 1. can sell, and 2. are really good at meeting new people.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From an economic standpoint it doesn't make sense.

 

You can shill for a company and collect a modest sum. And in some cases we are talking tiny.

 

Or you can *actually* work for yourself make some money. Organizing, cleaning, babysitting all pay decent money.

 

I had someone try to recruit me to sell MLM. They left me alone when I said that I worked 13 hours the previous week and had sent out a bill, which was promptly paid by my

client, for over $600.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

FYI—this isn’t about making money as much as it is about having *something* I do. I don’t need extra income, it would just be nice.

 

Also, I though I made it clear that I wouldn’t shake down my friends and family as that is the part that disgusts me.

Edited by Moxie
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the kit, enjoy the products, and sell a little here and there if you want.

I’m waiting for the next kit to come out(I don’t really like their current one) and then will probably re sign up. But I only do it because I like the products for cheap.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I just wonder who actually makes money on these things.  I don't blame people for trying it, but I dunno, just seems like at best you can get some low priced/free products.  Otherwise it hardly seems worth the effort.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FYI—this isn’t about making money as much as it is about having *something* I do. I don’t need extra income, it would just be nice.

 

Also, I though I made it clear that I wouldn’t shake down my friends and family as that is the part that disgusts me.

Who would your customers be and where would you find them?

 

As for being something to do...is selling stuff what you WANT to do? Because you have to like selling to sell well. Your take of MLM leaves me with the impression you don't really like sales.

 

I find the gigs I do (mostly bookkeeping and math tutoring) something to do and a way to use my skills. I tutor 2x a week and have a few bookkeeping clients who just need part time support. While the money is nice, it's also nice to chat with other adults, and do things like meet an old friend for lunch while I am onsite with a client.

Edited by LucyStoner
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FYI—this isn’t about making money as much as it is about having *something* I do. I don’t need extra income, it would just be nice.

 

Also, I though I made it clear that I wouldn’t shake down my friends and family as that is the part that disgusts me.

Well, the literal point of all Direct Sales is to gain sales through relationships you already have. That is the point of the business model as opposed to putting up a kiosk at the mall and brow-beating passers-by. Or getting a selling contract through Walmart or Target. Many diect sales companies are structured in such a way that you cannot escape the “warm†sales; it is not possible contractually. (Can’t speak for 31 specifically.) For example, there was a man who wanted to sell Arbonne but he wanted to sell it through a website model, not through DS. He was not permitted to do this. It is not allowed contractually. (This was a blog I read several years ago, so sorry for the vagaries on citing this story.)

 

I once sold Tupperware many years ago. We were prohibbited from doing “book parties†(though some people still managed to do them) because the sales model is based on someone demonstrating the product, the peer pressure of buying because that is why you are there, the inabiliy to compare prices as you would in a store, and the need to keep making new personal connections with others to then go pester for a party.

 

Maybe 31 uses a different model but I doubt it. Direct Sales are a specific business model for specific reasons and they are almost always very dependant upon relational connection. It is the point of the DS model.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if this is "just something to do" . . . . learn a new skill, volunteer somewhere on a regular basis, etc.  or just go get a part time job somewhere.  or even as has been suggested, start your own organization business where you are not product dependent.  because one brand does not meet everyone's needs.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think if you hate MLM, this would not be the thing for you.  I'd think about what you enjoy doing for fun, and turn that into volunteering somehow.  If you like to read, see if your library needs volunteers.  If you like babies, see if you can volunteer to be a hospital baby cuddler.  If you like animals, see about volunteering at the SPCA.  Maybe one of those things will eventually lead to part-time paid employment.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hate MLM but was sorely tempted by Steeped Tea.  I decided against it.  I don't want to be "that person" even if I really like the product.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...