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article: Why Being An Adjunct Faculty Member Is Terrible

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10 is eligible.

 

30 is when SS is not reduced due to Windfall Elimination Provision and Government Pension Offset.

 

So, as a long living female who will retire from a govt job that didn't contribute to SS for age 22-47 you would want your moonlighting as an adjunct work annually to earn you at least 2 quarters, then work enough from 47- up to become eligible to receive your SS benefits. Otherwise you go away happy that you donated your SS contributions and if you are widowed and live in to your late 90s you may regret that.

Interesting. I had to google because I never heard of this before. Here state jobs have a pension and SS withholding. I wonder how many states still have only pensions?

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Both my sons worked as adjuncts and it was tough. We are thankful that they both now have full time faculty jobs with benefits. The oldest teaches Spanish at Lane College in Jackson, Tennessee, and the younger teaches English at Penn State.

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10 is eligible.

 

30 is when SS is not reduced due to Windfall Elimination Provision and Government Pension Offset.

 

So, as a long living female who will retire from a govt job that didn't contribute to SS for age 22-47 you would want your moonlighting as an adjunct work annually to earn you at least 2 quarters, then work enough from 47- up to become eligible to receive your SS benefits. Otherwise you go away happy that you donated your SS contributions and if you are widowed and live in to your late 90s you may regret that.

I'm not sure I understand the last part.

 

This is from the socialsecurity pdf "5 things every woman needs to know about social security."

5. When your husband (or ex dies), you’re probably due a widow’s benefit ï®

Widows are due between 71 percent (at age 60) and 100 percent (at full retirement age) of what the husband was getting before he died. ï®

But we must pay your own retirement benefit first, then supplement it with whatever extra benefits you are due as a widow, to take your Social Security benefit up to the widow’s rate. ï®

We also can pay you a $255 one-time death benefit if you were living with your husband when he died. ï®

If you made more money than your husband, then he might be due a widower’s benefit on your record if you die before he does.

 

I read this as any SS benefit the retirement-age widow is due on her own SS account will be subtracted from the amount of benefit she would receive as the widow of a retired worker. So, the way I read this is unless a woman is going to be due SS retirement greater than her husband's benefit, working will not increase the amount of money she receives from social security in retirement. The point of the thread is that adjunct professors are low-paid, so someone intrested in adjuncting just for future SS benefits should investigate this fully. (Of course, working will give her money before she retires. I also understand there are other reasons for working besides money.)

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I'm not sure I understand the last part.

 

This is from the socialsecurity pdf "5 things every woman needs to know about social security."

5. When your husband (or ex dies), you’re probably due a widow’s benefit ï®

Widows are due between 71 percent (at age 60) and 100 percent (at full retirement age) of what the husband was getting before he died. ï®

But we must pay your own retirement benefit first, then supplement it with whatever extra benefits you are due as a widow, to take your Social Security benefit up to the widow’s rate. ï®

We also can pay you a $255 one-time death benefit if you were living with your husband when he died. ï®

If you made more money than your husband, then he might be due a widower’s benefit on your record if you die before he does.

 

I read this as any SS benefit the retirement-age widow is due on her own SS account will be subtracted from the amount of benefit she would receive as the widow of a retired worker. So, the way I read this is unless a woman is going to be due SS retirement greater than her husband's benefit, working will not increase the amount of money she receives from social security in retirement. The point of the thread is that adjunct professors are low-paid, so someone intrested in adjuncting just for future SS benefits should investigate this fully. (Of course, working will give her money before she retires. I also understand there are other reasons for working besides money.)

 

 

The point of my post is that many who are adjuncts have a main job with govt pension plan and don't/didn't contribute to SS in that job,  and need to make a certain amount of money per quarter from the adjunct job in order to max their retirement bennies from all sources in the future.  Read up on WEP and GPO to understand their situation re: spousal SS.

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I loved being an adjunct, but for me, it was a way to get out of the house and be an adult a couple of times a week. Honestly, it was enjoyable enough that the pay didn’t matter. But I’m guessing “mostly stay at home moms of young babies†are in relative short supply in the adjunct pool!

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I loved being an adjunct, but for me, it was a way to get out of the house and be an adult a couple of times a week. Honestly, it was enjoyable enough that the pay didn’t matter. But I’m guessing “mostly stay at home moms of young babies†are in relative short supply in the adjunct pool!

My DS13’s former charter school teacher was an adjunct while her firstborn was a toddler. However her husband is allowed to work from home most days and grandparents are emergency babysitters. Pay wasn’t high though so she went back to work as a public high school teacher once her firstborn started kindergarten.

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In my state, one of the reasons that there are so many adjuncts is that higher education budgets have been largely flat since 2009. Also, state-level approval is required to advertise for a professor in the community college system, but administrative positions are college-determined if they have the funding. When a professor retires, there's a long process to determine if the position should be advertised. Many are never reopened. The college I used to work for is building a new STEM facility, and I was told that they have approval for a professor slot in my field when they expand their offerings. But I can't wait 2-3 years for that.

 

The job I'm interviewing for is very specialized and requires a graduate degree, so it actually pays as well as a professor. It's something I would enjoy too. So I may ironically become part of the "overhead" that professors complain about!

 

We see the exact same thing on my Cal State campus. About half of our faculty are adjuncts, and we haven't had a tenure-line hire in over a decade (even though we've had many tenured faculty retire or leave).

 

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We see the exact same thing on my Cal State campus. About half of our faculty are adjuncts, and we haven't had a tenure-line hire in over a decade (even though we've had many tenured faculty retire or leave).

From SFGate on Feb 5 http://www.sfgate.com/expensive-san-francisco/article/The-secret-lives-of-part-time-Bay-Area-professors-12529299.php

“Former US Secretary of Labor and current UC Berkeley professor Robert Reich told SFGATE disparity exists because of the unique job market for each position based on supply and demand. Reich said adjunct faculty, who are plentiful, do not benefit from this economic situation.

 

"Unfortunately, it doesn't make any difference whether we are talking about public colleges or private colleges — the fact of the matter is that every bit and every part of the labor market is in its own bubble," Reich said. "Morally it's wrong. It's unfair. But that's what the economy is doing."â€

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