Jump to content

Menu

Book a Week 2018 - BW1: Welcome to our Open Roads Reading Adventure


Robin M

Recommended Posts

Happy New Year, dear hearts and welcome to another round of read 52 Books in 52 Weeks. Greetings to all our readers, all those just joining in and to all following our progress.  Mister Linky is available weekly on 52 Books in 52 Weeks  if you have a blog and would like to link to your reviews.

 

The rules are simple. Read 52 Books. Or set your own goal if you choose.  How you get there is up to you. 

 

We are going around the world again and to aid us in our venture, we have several optional challenges listed on the 52 Books website.  Our monthly itinerary may be found in Armchair Travels and AuthorsAlong the way, we are going to stop and spell the roses with Blossom Bookology, or entice your reading taste buds with another round of 52 Books Bingo, or delve into mysteries with the Great Mysterious England Road Trip.  

 

You may decide to engage with the greats through the Well Educated Mind or Nobel Prize Winners of Literature,  or fly through the world of science fiction and fantasy with Mind Voyages.   You may choose to read alphabetically with Alphabet Soup, finally dive into those dusty and chunky books that are probably yelling at you by now, or Feed Your Muse with poetry, essays and short stories.   As always, you may choose to travel along with me or follow your own path.  

 

Grab your walking shoes, backpack and maps as we begin our Open Roads Reading Adventure on the Silk Road which extends from the west coast of Japan to the Middle East. Our author choices of the month are Haruki Murakami and Miyuki Miyabe.   It has become a tradition to start our reading year with Murakami.  Join me in going back to his beginnings and read his debut Trilogy of the Rat -  Hear the Wind SingPinball, and A Wild Sheep Chase - or choose one of his other books if you prefer.  Also learn more about Miyuki Miyabe and dive into her debut story, All She Was Worth or one of her many other novels.   I currently have her paranormal story The Gates of Sorrow waiting in the wings. 

 

Our Blossom Bookology reading challenge begins in ancient times.  The flower of the month is Chrysanthemum which was cultivated in China in 15BC, brought to Japan in 8AD and became the symbol of the Japanese emperor and the imperial family, then introduced in 17th Century to the western world. It comes in a variety of colors and represents longevity and happiness.  

 

There are a number of directions to go with this challenge. You may choose to spell out the word, reading one book per letter using either the title or the first or last name of the author.  Yes, you can mix it up.  You may read a book with the name of the flower, color of the flower in the title or on the cover.  Another possibility is a book which takes place in the time period or the flower's country of origin or has some cultural significance and/or symbolism related to the flower.  The choices are unlimited.  Have fun following rabbit trails and see where it takes you. 

 

Also stowed away in my backpack are Keigo Higashino's Devotion of Suspect X, Qui Xiaolong's Mao Case, and Cixin Lui's Three Body Problem.

 

Cheers to a wonderful, flower filled, adventurous new reading year! 

 

Share your reading goals for the year or what you are reading this week.

 

 

Link to 2017 week 52

  • Like 16
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For the next few months, I’ll be reading from my TBR shelves since every year I start off with the goal of a  4 month buying ban.  I usually make it until February before I’m enticed by a new release by a favorite author.  *grin*  I'm going to try and avoid temptation this year and hold off. 

 

I’m starting my year with something historical but couldn’t wait to start and dove into Sharon Kay Penman’s 15th century history fiction novel -  The Sunne in Splendor – a couple day ago.  A dusty and chunky book which has been calling my name for some time.  I’ll be dipping into Murakami’s Trilogy of the Rat starting with Hear the Wind Sing in between Penman's book since it is quite chunky.

 

My armchair travel adventure is starting the year in Japan  so besides  Murakami’s Trilogy of the Rat and Miyabe’s The Gates of Sorrow, the other books on my nightstand is  Keigo Higashino's Devotion of Suspect X; as well as meandering through China with Qui Xiaolong's Mao Case, and Cixin Lui's Three Body Problem.

 

Inspiration  wise – I’m reading Thomas Merton’s Thoughts in Solitude.

 

Writing wise – Katherine Grubb’s Write a Novel in Ten Minutes a Day as well as Ralph Keyes The Courage to Write.  

 

Audiobook wise – I’m listening to Faith Hunter’s Blood of the Earth.  James and I are also listening to Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

 

Hubby is reading The Wolf: How One German Raider Terrorized the Allies in the Most Epic Voyage of WWI  by Richard Guilliatt.

 

We both picked a word of the year - mine is intention, his is accomplish.

 

 

 

 

“Live with intention.

Walk to the edge.

Listen Hard.

Practice wellness.

Play with abandon.

Laugh.

Choose with no regret.

Appreciate your friends.

Continue to learn.

Do what you love.

Live as if this is all there is.†

 

― Mary Anne Radmacher

 

 

 

~Cheers to a wonderful, productive, intentional writing and reading new year! 

Edited by Robin M
  • Like 20
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Happy New Year!!

 

It may be a couple of days before I can indulge in lots of reading time as youngest ds is still here. The first book I plan to finish reading this year is Murakami's Wind up Bird Chronicle. I had started it last year, and was enjoying it but wasn't quite in the mood for it at the time. I also have a couple of audiobook gifts from my oldest ds, one is a Star Trek book which he particularly loved and the other is a memoir of a woman who apprenticed as a gardener in Kyoto, Japan. 

 

I like the idea of traveling the world with mysteries. But as I'm not one motivated by challenges, I'll once again be following my own quixotic reading muse, no doubt picking up books to read that y'all have loved.

 

Now, just to be a bit obnoxiously pedantic.... 

 

 

My armchair travel adventure is starting the year in Japan  so besides  Murakami’s Trilogy of the Rat and Miyabe’s The Gates of Sorrow, the other books on my nightstand is  Keigo Higashino's Devotion of Suspect X, Qui Xiaolong's Mao Case, and Cixin Lui's Three Body Problem.

 

Qiu Xiaolong and Liu Cixin are both Chinese writers. Both books look amazing, though, and I've added them to my "Want to read" list at Goodreads. Fun fact, Qui Xiaolong's given name -- xiao long -- means "small dragon".

 

 

 

  • Like 16
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Happy New Year!!

 

It may be a couple of days before I can indulge in lots of reading time as youngest ds is still here. The first book I plan to finish reading this year is Murakami's Wind up Bird Chronicle. I had started it last year, and was enjoying it but wasn't quite in the mood for it at the time. I also have a couple of audiobook gifts from my oldest ds, one is a Star Trek book which he particularly loved and the other is a memoir of a woman who apprenticed as a gardener in Kyoto, Japan. 

 

I like the idea of traveling the world with mysteries. But as I'm not one motivated by challenges, I'll once again be following my own quixotic reading muse, no doubt picking up books to read that y'all have loved.

 

Now, just to be a bit obnoxiously pedantic.... 

 

 

Qiu Xiaolong and Liu Cixin are both Chinese writers. Both books look amazing, though, and I've added them to my "Want to read" list at Goodreads. Fun fact, Qui Xiaolong's given name -- xiao long -- means "small dragon".

Welcome back for another round. What is the name of the Star Trek book?   Whoops and thank you!   Yes, I'm aware Xiaolong and Cixin are Chinese writers.  I probably should amend my post a bit as I'll be hanging out in both countries. I've been reading Xiaolong's series for some time.  So very good! 

Edited by Robin M
  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm attempting 52 books again this year and have decided to start off by rereading some of my favorites. First up is Wolf Hall, one of my all time best loved books. I'm also taking Wes Callihan's Great Books for Adults class, so when we reconvene we'll be reading Eusebius, Ecclesiastical HistoryCurrent audiobook is History of the Renaissance World by SWB. And  I'm working through Nurtured by Love by Shin'ichi Suzuki, as my family/educational inspiration book this month.  I'm not sure if I'll join in any challenges, beyond trying to average a book a week- sometimes that's challenge enough. :)

 

Happy New Year everyone!! 

Glad you are back for another round.  I've had Wolf Hall in my stacks for quite a while.  Looking forward to hearing what you think.  Your great books class sounds fascinating.  

  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Happy new reading year!

 

My main goal is 52 for 52. I'm also going to do the Mind Voyage challenge, the dusty challenge, the chunky challenge, and the WTM challenge. I, like Robin, am not going to spend any money on books for at least 4 months (see, Robin, I've got your back) and will be going through my shelves and pulling out those books that I have been meaning to get to for the past few years. DS has a great book collection and I'm going to go through his books as well.

 

First up for me is Classic Words by Michael Clay Thompson. I'll be doing a word a day for the month of January. I began monthly challenges last year and this little tome (which I bought while homeschooling DS and has been sitting there begging to be read) is perfect for a Jan. challenge.

 

I glanced at DS's shelf and, lo and behold, he had Starship Troopers by Robert Heinlein, so I'm beginning the Mind Voyage early on.

 

DH and I are leaving for a trip soon and I need to go to the library for audiobooks. I cancelled my Kindle Unlimited membership since I am trying to do the dusty challenge (and save money) for the time being. 

 

Edited by Scoutermom
  • Like 13
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I plan on finishing Sleeping Beauties by Stephen and Owen King this week. 

My goal for the challenge this year is 36 books. I'm hoping to be able to read more than that but I am finishing up my degree this year and when school is in session, I don't have a lot of free time for fun reading.

  • Like 13
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have managed to lose my first post of the new year. So one more time......but shorter!

 

I have to admit that I am really looking forward to the challenges. Bingo, Alphabetical, and Flowers all all in my plans. Obviously the British Mysteries.... :lol: ;)

 

I have my first Bingo book ready to start for Elephant on the Cover. The Unexpected Inheritance of Inspector Chopra https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/24717411-the-unexpected-inheritance-of-inspector-chopra. It's been on my wish list for quite awhile.

 

I also have Wind/Pinwheel ready to go for my Murakami. Can't wait! I ended up putting some of Robin's other suggestions on hold. Fun list!

 

Currently reading The Man in the Empty Suit https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13531802-man-in-the-empty-suit and listening to It Devours! https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/34522639-it-devours which is the new Night Vale book. Dd loved it.

  • Like 13
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome back for another round. What is the name of the Star Trek book?  

 

 

Another one here who would like to know the name of the Star Trek book in question.

 

Sorry -- I should have known my audience better and provided the title! :lol:   It is Captain to Captain, book 1 of the 50th anniversary Star Trek Legacies trilogy. Have either of you read it?

 

Glad to hear you've enjoyed Qiu Xiaolong's detective series so far -- I'll be looking for them soon.

  • Like 12
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Happy new year!  I'm jumping back in after being away for a couple of years.  I have lurked a bit.  :-)  Realized how much I missed this group after reading/posting in another thread about reading.

 

I had set a goal of 65 books last year and fell short as my retirement from homeschooling turned out not to be as leisurely as I thought.  So aiming for 50 this year.  

 

I'm starting with Georgette Heyer's A Christmas Party (original title Envious Casca), which I received for Christmas, having ordered it and given it to my husband to wrap.  I'm enjoying it but not as much as I'd hoped.  I also have a huge stack out from the library; my usual misplaced optimism that I'll have tons of reading time over the holidays.

 

It feels good to be back!

 

 

  • Like 19
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm back for another year.  Going to try to get the Bingo challenge done again, and also try not to buy any books - not for the first 4 months, but for all year (gasp! - we are actually trying to not spend any money in 2018 on anything besides necessities and I have lots and lots of books at home to read as well as easy access to a good library system).

 

My other goals are to finish last year's shelf of books (6 to go) and complete the half shelf that lies in between last year's shelf and the previous year's shelf.  Also to read at least one book in French.

 

And - this is a big one - I'm going to try to read while I eat breakfast/lunch instead of hanging out at the computer.  Our dining room table is at last free again as we created a giant crafting space for DD last week so she won't be colonizing the table with all her many large and involved projects (we hope!).  So I intend to intentionally sit down at the table to eat with a book in hand.

 

My word for the year is nourish, as in nourish myself both emotionally and physically and nourish the rest of my household members in the same way.

 

I'm starting off the year with a book from the shelf called Georgia: An Arctic Diary, which was written by a woman (named Georgia - no last name given) who went north to Alaska and then the Canadian Arctic in 1964 and has chronicled her experiences living there in the 60s and 70s.  So far it's been an interesting snippet of life as it was in these remote hamlets during that time, as the dance between traditional living and modernization continued for the Inuit

 

I'm also reading We Were Witches by Ariel Gore - Gore is the founding editor of Hip Mama, which I found to be an important publication when my kids were young.  This book explores her experiences as a very young single mother in the 90s - a time which doesn't seem to long ago to me, nor as unenlightened as it was - it's funny how we forget how things that are commonplace now were shocking then to many people.

 

Happy reading to all!

  • Like 14
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry -- I should have known my audience better and provided the title! :lol:   It is Captain to Captain, book 1 of the 50th anniversary Star Trek Legacies trilogy. Have either of you read it?

 

I don't believe I've read it.  Fortunately, my library has a copy so I've requested to receive it in February.  I'll let you know then!

**

 

A one day only currently free Kindle book ~

 

The Gold Bag (The Fleming Stone Mysteries) by Carolyn Wells

 

"A detective investigating the murder of a millionaire teams up with master sleuth Fleming Stone in this clever mystery from a pioneer of American crime fiction

 

Eager to prove himself as talented a crime-solver as his hero, the famous investigator Fleming Stone, young detective Herbert Burroughs takes on a puzzling case: the murder of wealthy businessman Joseph Crawford, who was killed in the study of his New Jersey home. With no shortage of suspects, the primary clue is a woman’s gold bag discovered at the scene of the crime.

 

Burroughs believes the old man’s lovely niece is innocent, and he’s beginning to fall for her besides. But the young woman has a clear motive: She stands to inherit the bulk of Crawford’s fortune—and she admits to owning a gold purse! Her unscrupulous fiancé might be the real culprit, however, or it could be one of the millionaire victim’s several disloyal servants. No matter how hard he tries, Burroughs cannot make sense of the clues he unearths, and it soon becomes apparent that only a mind as perceptive as Fleming Stone’s can solve this impossible crime. So the student decides to turn to the master—even if it means seeing the object of his heart’s desire proven guilty once and for all."

 

Regards,

Kareni

  • Like 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I always start off the year wanting to post to this thread regularly but then not doing it. I’m realizing more and more in my life that I have these bad perfectionist tendencies, where if I think I’ll do it every week and then I miss a week, I think “Oh, well, that’s over for the year.†Which is really kind of stupid. 

 

I don’t usually do the challenges. My general goal is to read more. :) 

 

Right now I’m reading Uncommon Type by Tom Hanks and really liking it. I’m also deciding whether or not I want to finish a book that I read for my book club but didn’t finish before our discussion: Marting Luther by Eric Metaxas. I think the ship has sailed for me on that one, at least for now. 

 

 

  • Like 20
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I finished 4 books last week, bringing my 2017 total to 94.

 

I read The Unwanteds because my daughter likes the series.  It was described as Hunger Games meets Harry Potter, but it really was more a toned down version of Harry Potter meets The Giver.  It was fine.  I also finished The Way Life Should Be by Christina Baker Kline.  I knew I wouldn't like this book, and I didn't.  I have a particular pet peeve with authors who own summer houses in Maine and then write novels as if they have any idea what living in Maine is actually like.  Which when I think about it logically, is ridiculous of me.  But, I think pet peeves are allowed to be a little ridiculous  :lol: .

 

I also read I Liked My Life by Abby Fabiaschi.  This was an interesting novel.  The story rotated between 3 viewpoints, the mother the teenage daughter and the father.  The mother had just died and found herself in some sort of purgatory/ghost state, able to send thoughts to her teenage daughter and husband, to try to help them move on.

 

And I finished Black and Blue by Anna Quindlen.   An abused woman escapes her husband with the help of a network that helps women get away.

 

This year I have a couple of goals.   I want to read the 5 Ishiguro books I haven't read, and I have 28 dusty books that have been collecting for years that I want to finally read, and get rid of.   Oh the horror, I know  :laugh: !   I like to keep the bulk of "my book collection" at the public library  :leaving:.

 

This week I started reading Victoria and Abdul, and The End of the World Running Club.   So far the Victoria book is boring, and the End of the World book is exciting.

 

I also started to listen to The Inimitable Jeeves, and continue to slog away at Alexander Hamilton.  Jeeves is funny, and I like the narrator.   Alexander Hamilton was an interesting person, absolutely, but the book needed to be MUCH shorter.

 

DH and I saw The Mountain Between Us this weekend which I read a couple of years ago.   I didn't really like the book, but I thought it would make a good movie.   The reviews of the movie I read were bad, but DH and actually enjoyed it.  The only thing that annoyed both of us was the completely unnecessary s*x scene.   I guess we're officially old farts.

  • Like 13
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I finished 4 books last week, bringing my 2017 total to 94.

 

I read The Unwanteds because my daughter likes the series. It was described as Hunger Games meets Harry Potter, but it really was more a toned down version of Harry Potter meets The Giver. It was fine. I also finished The Way Life Should Be by Christina Baker Kline. I knew I wouldn't like this book, and I didn't. I have a particular pet peeve with authors who own summer houses in Maine and then write novels as if they have any idea what living in Maine is actually like. Which when I think about it logically, is ridiculous of me. But, I think pet peeves are allowed to be a little ridiculous :lol: .

 

I also read I Liked My Life by Abby Fabiaschi. This was an interesting novel. The story rotated between 3 viewpoints, the mother the teenage daughter and the father. The mother had just died and found herself in some sort of purgatory/ghost state, able to send thoughts to her teenage daughter and husband, to try to help them move on.

 

And I finished Black and Blue by Anna Quindlen. An abused woman escapes her husband with the help of a network that helps women get away.

 

This year I have a couple of goals. I want to read the 5 Ishiguro books I haven't read, and I have 28 dusty books that have been collecting for years that I want to finally read, and get rid of. Oh the horror, I know :laugh: ! I like to keep the bulk of "my book collection" at the public library :leaving:.

 

This week I started reading Victoria and Abdul, and The End of the World Running Club. So far the Victoria book is boring, and the End of the World book is exciting.

 

I also started to listen to The Inimitable Jeeves, and continue to slog away at Alexander Hamilton. Jeeves is funny, and I like the narrator. Alexander Hamilton was an interesting person, absolutely, but the book needed to be MUCH shorter.

 

DH and I saw The Mountain Between Us this weekend which I read a couple of years ago. I didn't really like the book, but I thought it would make a good movie. The reviews of the movie I read were bad, but DH and actually enjoyed it. The only thing that annoyed both of us was the completely unnecessary s*x scene. I guess we're officially old farts.

I've been looking at Victoria and Abdul as a potential book for my book to movie square so I really hope it improves! I'm not sure that the book came first but we were on IoW when it was being filmed. I haven't seen the movie either. :lol: So maybe we should just say I am curious......

 

I have to admit I also prefer to store my books at the library. After giving away and donating a huge book collection when we moved to England I just can't do it again. One odd side effect has been I don't reread as much as I once did. Thanks to Overdrive many of my favourites are probably more accessible (a few clicks) than ever but I seem to have lost interest.

  • Like 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2018 PLANS

Goals, goals, goals. I set stretch goals for myself last year and met only two out of four. So this year I’m hoping to make my goals more approachable, but less anxiety producing.

  • Read 200 Books: I met my Goodreads goal last year and then some. For health reasons, I’ve cut out most other activities other than reading and internet browsing so I’m actually hoping I read less next year. More exercise, more writing, less reading. I’ve set the goal at 200 books.
  • Explore Monthly Interests: I enjoyed most of rabbit trails this year (horror was a bust), especially when I read the books in a short period of time. It helped me make connections between each author’s thesis and really delve into my thoughts. I actually ended up with a long list of to-be-read books for each subject so I’ll explore a new one each month, using the month’s end as a psychological stop to move on. I may follow the BAW themes. I may not.

  • Read NPR Fantasy/Sci-Fi 100: I’ve read many of the books on the NPR list, but not all so I’ve decided to read the list from C.S. Lewis to J. R. R. Tolkien. I read a few sci-fi reads as part of the Great Courses How Great Science Fiction Works, but didn’t find all the books compelling. I’m hoping the NPR list will be more interesting. There’s many series listed which when totaled summed to at least 250+ books. To keep my sanity, I’ve limited series reads to three books to give it a chance, which means re-reading the first two Malazan books. Oof. My bookshelf is here.

  • Read One Poetry Book a Month: I’m not drawn to poetry, but when I read a good poetry book, I’m pleased. So here’s my unrealistic stretch goal. I figure I need just one.

 

I’ll start off with our forum host’s Rethinking School by Susan Wise Bauer which comes out January 9th. The front section of The Well-Trained Mind made me think about my own views on education, and I’m interested in seeing what she has to say in a stand-alone book. I also have several of her other books in progress; perhaps I should take this year to finish them.

 

All other books are subject to whim as my interests dictate.

 

For nonfiction, I’ve made Michael Lewis and Stephen Jay Gould my focus authors. Black Swan led me to Benoit Mandelbrot, fractal geometry, and the misbehavior of markets which means I have several additional books to explore.

 

My focus fiction authors are Catherynne Valente and Terry Pratchett. Plus, the NPR list above will likely lead to more authors.

 

Books read last week (up to 12/31/2017):

  • Equal Rites by Terry Pratchett. Fantasy. A wizard is reincarnated as a woman and no one knows what to do with her. I enjoyed this more than Wyrd Sisters.

  • Genghis Khan and the Remaking of the Modern World by Jack Weatherford. History-Mongolia. The history of a Mongolian tribal lord and his influence on Europe and Asia.

  • Thud! by Terry Pratchett. Fantasy. Sam Vines, the only righteous man in Ankh-Morpork, struggles to prevent ancient hatreds from erupting into outright war. In View from the Cheap Seats, Neil Gaiman wrote an essay refuting a fan's comment that Pratchett was “a jolly old elf.†While the Discworld books can dabble in the funny and absurd, it’s clear, especially in this book, that Pratchett is angry - at injustice, at stupidity, at blind hatred - and rightly so. This is one of my favorite Pratchetts. Highly recommended, but I’d advise reading Guards! Guards! first to introduce the characters.

  • The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy 2017 edited by Charles Yu. Short Stories - Science Fiction and Fantasy. A collection of recent short stories with contributions from Cathrynne Valente and N.K. Jemison.

  • What I Talk About When I Talk About Running by Haruki Murakami. Memoir. A short memoir of Murakami’s relationship with running and life. I used to run until my dance-ruined knees made it clear that if I wanted to keep my original joints, I needed lower impact exercise, but I could relate to much of what Murakami felt when it came to running.

  • Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell. Science Fiction. Six interwoven short stories presented in an interesting structure.

  • Signs Preceding the End of the World by Yuri Herrera. Modern Fiction. A young woman crosses the Mexican-USA border, but are the boundaries real or imagined?

  • We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed With Our Families by Philip Gourevitch. History-Rwanda. A collection of testimonies from survivors of the Rwandan massacre, covering the events leading up to the killing and the aftermath. The author is rightly angry and frustrated with the international response to the massacres and ultimately has more questions for what can be done to prevent similar events in the future. One of the survivor’s stories was the basis for the movie Hotel Rwanda. Highly recommended.

  • The Rules of Magic by Alice Hoffman. Fantasy. In New York City, three siblings deal with death and love while managing their magical abilities. I liked Practical Magic and this sequel was just as lovely and poignant.

 

I’m finishing up The (Mis)behavior of Markets, Monstrous Regiment, Patient H.M., and Strange Weather. I had several books in progress just to make sure I kept my 2017 books read a prime number because I can sometimes be weird about numbers.

Edited by ErinE
  • Like 13
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

For the next few months, I’ll be reading from my TBR shelves since every year I start off with the goal of a  4 month buying ban.  I usually make it until February before I’m enticed by a new release by a favorite author.  *grin*  I'm going to try and avoid temptation this year and hold off. 
 
I’m starting my year with something historical but couldn’t wait to start and dove into Sharon Kay Penman’s 15th century history fiction novel -  The Sunne in Splendor – a couple day ago.  A dusty and chunky book which has been calling my name for some time.  

 

Can't wait to hear what you think of Sunne. It was my assigned reading from Kathy one year and I loved it. I think ErinE also read it. I just realized we now have two Erin's on this thread ... I actually think new Erin would enjoy it also. 

 

Happy new reading year!

 

My main goal is 52 for 52. I'm also going to do the Mind Voyage challenge, the dusty challenge, the chunky challenge, and the WTM challenge. I, like Robin, am not going to spend any money on books for at least 4 months (see, Robin, I've got your back) and will be going through my shelves and pulling out those books that I have been meaning to get to for the past few years. DS has a great book collection and I'm going to go through his books as well.

 

 

I glanced at DS's shelf and, lo and behold, he had Starship Troopers by Robert Heinlein, so I'm beginning the Mind Voyage early on.

 

 

I too solemn swear that I will not buy any new books for four months. Stay strong ladies!

 

Have you read any Robert Heinlein before? He was a surprise hit in my house last year. DH, myself, even my mom read Starship Troopers and loved it. I'm not a scifi fan at all either. 

 

I have my first Bingo book ready to start for Elephant on the Cover. The Unexpected Inheritance of Inspector Chopra https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/24717411-the-unexpected-inheritance-of-inspector-chopra. It's been on my wish list for quite awhile.

 

 

I got this for Christmas from a friend. Perhaps I should move it up higher on my to-read list.

 

I'm going to attempt this again! I totally skipped last year, after I didn't complete 2016. I think I will start with something by C.S. Lewis.

 

 

Welcome back! Are you reading? Then you're welcome here! I hope you stay and chat with us this year.

  • Like 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I realized the other day that I have 63 books in my Audible account (and > 7 Great Courses on audio not included in that total).

 

This year, I'd like to relisten to some of the ones I enjoyed the first time around like Seventh Son and Enchantment by Orson Scott Card, The Adventure of English by Mevyn Bragg, and a Tale of Two Cities by Dickens.

I'd like to listen to some of the ones I downloaded for free, but never tried like The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins or Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte.

And, I'd like to finish some that I started previously like The Return of the Native by Thomas Hardy and Neil Gaiman's Norse Mythology.

 

So, I'd like to listen to 21 of my Audible books (1/3 the list) and add 6 (one every two months) books of the e-book variety (Kindle Firsts or check-outs from the library) for a total of 27 books or an average of one every two weeks.

 

I'm going to start out with finishing Norse Mythology. I've barely started it, but maybe I can make a dent in it while I walk the treadmill. I enjoyed it when I listened; I just didn't go back to it after the second listen.

  • Like 14
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have you read any Robert Heinlein before? He was a surprise hit in my house last year. DH, myself, even my mom read Starship Troopers and loved it. I'm not a scifi fan at all either. 

 

I'm a big Heinlein fan - even his really weird stuff. I want my kids to read & discuss Starship Troopers - debating the ideas of "citizenship" and voting that Heinlein describes in that world. Next time I do a government course, I'm adding that as part of it - at least for my own kid. For some reason, Stranger in a Strange Land has come to my mind a lot recently, too. I may have to reread that one, if I can find it on my shelves.

  • Like 15
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Week One! It's so exciting. A new exciting year ahead of us. I'm also delighted to see new faces and some gals that have been gone for a bit but are returning! 

 

I've been thinking a bunch about reading goals for the year. I'm going to try and copy ErinE's posting style here since it is always so neat and orderly. (I suspect that her desk at home has everything just so!)

 

2018 READING WORD OF THE YEAR (I couldn't decide on just one so I'm going with two!):

  • Classics - DH reads a ton of classics and loves them. I'm inspired this year to get outside my comfort zone and try a few bigger intimidating classics.
  • BooksOnMyShelf - I've got this shelf that I put books on that I want to read and then they just sit there. This is where I'm starting. I'm not going to get any library books until I've read half these books.

 

image_4.jpeg

 

CHALLENGE ACCEPTED:

  • Mystery Bingo - I'm really excited about so many of these categories.
  • 1 of 12 Flowers - Basically that's a realistic goal for me.
  • Dusty - So many books just sitting on my shelf.
  • Chunky  - I'm aiming for two books this year.
  • No New Books - Four month buying ban in place
  • Audiobooks  - One per month for 12 this year. I'm aiming to do at least four Great Courses.
  • Read Alouds for my 13 yo - This was a big fail in 2017. Hoping this year will be better. Shooting for six books.
  • Read Alouds for 4 yo - I want to read to him every night. Usually it's not a problem but this year I'm going to intentional about it. 
  • Brit Tripping - So excited about this one!

If you guys haven't checked out Robin's BaW blog you really should. She updated it for 2018 and it looks so cool. 

  • Like 15
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I always start off the year wanting to post to this thread regularly but then not doing it. I’m realizing more and more in my life that I have these bad perfectionist tendencies, where if I think I’ll do it every week and then I miss a week, I think “Oh, well, that’s over for the year.†Which is really kind of stupid. 

 

I have those same perfectionist tendencies. 

 

 

 

And - this is a big one - I'm going to try to read while I eat breakfast/lunch instead of hanging out at the computer.  Our dining room table is at last free again as we created a giant crafting space for DD last week so she won't be colonizing the table with all her many large and involved projects (we hope!).  So I intend to intentionally sit down at the table to eat with a book in hand.

 

 

 

I need to do this as well. I've gotten into the very bad habit of watching TV/computer while eating instead of reading. I really would rather read but for some reason...

  • Like 14
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I tend to read multiple books at one time. Since I read a lot of non-fiction, I like to let the thoughts marinate in my head a little while I read something different. Charlotte Mason-esque, I guess.

 

Currently reading for fiction: The Yahweh Gene by N.J. Simmons. It's completely outside my normal fiction tastes but he's an instagram friend and this is his first book so I want to be supportive. So far it's very well written and a good read if you like dystopian fiction. (And the ebook is currently free!)

 

Currently reading for non-fiction: Washington by Ron Chernow. I've been working on this one for months. I read a few pages here and there.

 

How To Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie. That's a reread.

 

The 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene. I'm aiming for a power a week. 

 

Principles by Ray Dalio. The first part was slow going because a lot of the financial stuff went over my head. I still don't understand commodities. 

 

And Popular by Mitch Prinstein. I just started this. According to the author, popularity can affect your DNA? That's something new to me. I'm looking forward to reading more.

 

I also look forward to seeing what everyone else is reading.

  • Like 14
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Happy 2018, BAWers. My goal is 52 books this year. Hopefully more, but let’s go with doable.

 

One thing, it’s silly, but I get hung up on this: when I choose not to finish a book, I don’t know whether or not I get to count it. I’m just a stickler for detail and I feel I cannot “count†a book if I did not read it ALL. Do you “countâ€your DNFs? I tell myself it doesn’t matter, that the book-count police will not come arrest me for counting a book I did not finish, but then, sure enough, I am uneasy putting it on my tabulation if I DNF! There’s probably a medication for that...

 

I am currently reading “The Underground Railroad†by Colton Whitehead, for my IRL book club. I do not love it. I am having a hard time suspending belief and it is affecting my enjoy,ent of the story. I am more than half finished, though, and will probably muddle through.

 

I am also currently reading “How to Not Dieâ€. It breaks up the fiction work when I need to go back to the world of factual information. I want to change some things about how I eat and feed my family, though we have a fairly good diet already. But it is not easy to get other people to go along with diet changes, I find. It seems the best I can do is have some old favorites for everyone else while I also provide my “weird†riced cauliflower or quinoa for myself. It’s tricky.

 

When I did this BAW several years ago, one of my mini-challenges was to read one classic per month, so I think I might resume that challenge for this year, too. I have “Brave New World†sitting around here; I want to get to that.

  • Like 18
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I decided to start the New Year right by reading a book of the Bible.

So naturally I picked a short one, LOL.  But meaty.

 

It's Philippians, the great epistle of joy.  But there is so much more to it, it's absolutely the perfect thing to read on New Year's, especially if goal setting is in the mix as it is for me.  Very glad to have read this today, for more reasons than I can reasonably say in a post.

 

Then in progress I have 'American Housewife', a quirky and funny book of short stories about modern American life, totally OTT in the most well-written, evocative way possible.  So far, so good!

 

 

  • Like 16
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My basic goal for 2018 is to keep reading. But I'm actually going to try to drop the idea of completing a book every week. If I'm reading a longer book (like last year's War and Peace), I don't want to feel like I've got to finish something else every week too. I also find I won't read short stories or poems or plays if I can't count it as a book. So my goal is to just read and not hamstring myself with limits, goals, or challenges. I usually have no problem finding the next thing I want to read and don't really need a challenge to spur me on. I would like to read more classics this year (read only 2 last year). I'm thinking of tackling a Faulkner this summer (I was not fond of him in high school but think I would get more out of it now). I would like to get 2 or 3 books read from my shelves and then donated to the library book sale in the next month or so (sale in late February). I may join in on read-alongs that sound interesting.

 

My first book for 2018 is Thi Bui's graphic novel memoir The Best We Could Do. She and her family were refugees from Vietnam in the late seventies, and this book explores the cost of war and refugee life on families and multiple generations. Very powerful, very well-done. One dd has finished it already and the other is a little behind me--glad they appreciate it too. After that I have We Were Eight Years in Power waiting for me at the library. Oh, and I started Lexicon for my treadmill reading this morning since I can't read a graphic novel on the treadmill--too much page turning! TBWCD and Lexicon were part of our Jolabokaflod Christmas morning.

  • Like 17
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Okay, goals for next year...

 

I averaged 2-3 books a week last year, so I'm going to aim for 104, a number that would have seemed completely insanely out of reach at this time last year, but now seems downright doable. :)

 

I want to keep up the German and Spanish reading at a rate of about 1 a month.  I have over 12 of each on my short list of books I've prioritized for this year, but if I managed one a month of each I'll be happy.  Last year I read 12 in German and 10 in Spanish.  And I'll continue to mix in translated books, which were only 14% of my total this year (not all translated into English).  I want to start on the round-the-year challenge, but I see that as a multi-year project...

 

Trying to decide if I should recommit myself to getting through La peste at some point.  That was a fail last year...

 

I'd like to continue to mix in some classics - looking back at last year, I read 14 without being particularly intentional about it, so one a month seems a reasonable goal.

 

As far as Challenges, I'm not quite sure yet.  I would easily have read 10 or more Chunky books last year if I hadn't had a cram at the end of the year to get in more Bingo reads (I ended at 9 Chunkys - just one book short of Mother Ocean level!  So annoying...).  So I think I'd like to up that number a bit and not chase after Bingo squares quite so much. 

 

Ditto with non-fiction - I came in at 22% non-fiction last year, but I think it would been higher if I hadn't gotten a bit carried away with the Bingo at the end.  Maybe aim for 25% this year?

 

I'm not as drawn to the flower challenge as I was to the birthstone challenge, so I'll probably skip it unless someone's reading something for it that I get excited about. ;)

 

I've never done a 'no buying books' challenge, but I have tried to buy as little as possible.  The only books I bought last year were things I couldn't get from the library (either hardcopy, or e/audio on Overdrive).  I was even able to get most Spanish I read from the library, meaning the bulk of my 'bought' list were German titles - those I don't seem to be able to source any other way.  Fortunately, it seems it's much easier to get somewhat reasonably-priced used German books on Amazon now - buying them from Germany is $$$!

 

And still on the fence about Bingo.  I think I might have to go cold-turkey for a while and then see how I'm feeling. :lol:

 

After ending the year with a bunch of 2-star reads (this I think has affected my mood on things...), I'm starting off this one fresh with things I'm enjoying!  

 

- Sein eigener Herr/ Independent People by Haldór Laxness - this could have been my 10th Chunky, but didn't finish on time.  But I'm enjoying it, so it's all good. :D

 

- One Day the Ice Will Reveal All Its Dead by Clare Dudham (audiobook) - rather randomly downloaded this this morning based on what Overdrive had available that was on my TR list.  Got about a half hour in, and am really liking it!  Historical fiction based on the life of Alfred Wegener, the man who came up with the idea of continental drift.  Lovely writing so far.  Nice to be enjoying an audiobook again - the last one was the worst since The Essex Serpent.

 

- The Dark is Rising - I've started!  A reread, but haven't read it in years and was inspired by the readalong, even though I don't do Twitter.

 

- Zealot by Reza Aslan (ebook) - another rather random choice from my TR list based on what Overdrive had available. ;)  Haven't actually started yet, but I've had this on my TR list for years, so, finally diving in!

 

 

 

Looking forward to another great reading year!  Welcome to all the newbies and returning members!  

 

 

  • Like 14
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quill ~ I did not count the two books (one was print, one was an audiobook) I started and DNF.  I read about 1/3 of each and that just wasn't enough to place them into the finished/read category. 

 

I did make a note of them in my journal, though, just in case I cross paths with them again. 

 

I don't count them either.  One of the reasons I didn't meet my goal last year was starting too many books that I didn't finish.  I probably read enough pages altogether to count as another book or three.  I have an unfinished shelf in Goodreads.  Some don't even make it there, though.

 

If I get over halfway through a book and skim the rest, enough to know the entire basic story, I do count it. 

  • Like 13
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Happy New Year!  I've been in and out of this thread for years but this year I'd like to be a consistent poster.  No particular reading goals at the moment.  Robin mentioned starting with a novel from Japan, though, and for anyone looking for Japanese fiction I will note that one of my all-time favorite novels -- from anywhere -- is The Waiting Years, by Fumiko Enchi.  It is brilliant, and the ending is unforgettable.

 

Right now, I am reading How Not to be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking, by Jordan Ellenberg, and Less Than Angels, by Barbara Pym.  They're both terrific. 

  • Like 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Happy 2018, BAWers. My goal is 52 books this year. Hopefully more, but let’s go with doable.

 

One thing, it’s silly, but I get hung up on this: when I choose not to finish a book, I don’t know whether or not I get to count it. I’m just a stickler for detail and I feel I cannot “count†a book if I did not read it ALL. Do you “countâ€your DNFs? I tell myself it doesn’t matter, that the book-count police will not come arrest me for counting a book I did not finish, but then, sure enough, I am uneasy putting it on my tabulation if I DNF! There’s probably a medication for that...

 

 

 

I do and sometimes I don't count books that I didn't finish. I still list them in my notebook, and if I abandoned it I write a big ol' letter A next to the title. I don't necessarily write that "A" in scarlet...but I am happy to mark it as abandoned. I even have a Goodreads shelf devoted to Abandoned titles. It is a shelf of shame -- the book's shame, not mine, lol!

 

But if I made it close to being done, and if it is a book that has stuck with me, I do count it. This scenario is generally for a non-fiction book. With a work of fiction I will still count it if I skipped a bunch just to read the last chapter or two. Most 3 star books get this treatment. If it is fun but poorly written, I'm too impatient to put up with the bad  all the way to the end, so skim til I get to the resolution, and call it done.

 

Have I horrified everyone? I like to sew without a pattern, homeschooled without curricula or "programs", so there is that rebellious streak to my personality!

  • Like 14
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I dropped off the BaW threads sometime late-spring (again) in 2017. I have great plans to NOT do that this year.

My goal is to read 52 books this year, but not necessarily one per week. 

I just finished (like, half an hour ago) Kingsolver's The Poisonwood Bible for the first time. 

And, it cries out to be talked about. But, there's no one to talk to IRL except dh who is still in the middle of the audio, and who has already read it once 15+ years ago, so he knows where it's headed, but he doesn't remember all the details.

 

I just have to say...knowing that this space/thread is here, makes me smile every time I think about it.

Thank you!

 

  • Like 10
Link to comment
Share on other sites

According to Goodreads I read 61 books last year and met my goal, but some of those were short e-books and cookbooks. I always have those, though, so I usually set my goal number higher to account for them. Then I'm pretty sure that I've made 52. My real goal last year was to read fewer books but more pages and I accomplished that; I ended up with a little over 19000 pages, which was 500-1000 more pages than I read in 2016 even though I read fewer books.

 

I set my 2018 goal at 65, but I have this crazy idea that I 'd like to read 52 novels this year. For years I read mostly nonfiction because i didn't think I had time to get sucked into novels. Partly thanks to participating in this thread I have been getting back into fiction. Last year I read quite a few novels, especially toward the end of the year, and I'm hoping to continue that trend.

 

I'm writing again and that takes a lot of my "free" time, but I hope to post again regularly this year!

 

I actually finished my first book today, but it's a cheat. I'd read 3/4 of it by last night but I decided I wanted to work on a scene in my novel instead of finishing it before midnight. It's the first Sydney Chambers book, Sidney Chambers and the Shadow of Death. My husband is watching the PBS series on his iPad while I write at night and I had snagged the book on a kindle deal at some point, so I decided I would start reading along with his viewing. The differences between TV and book can be great, though! I think I like book Sidney better. I enjoy the philosophical musings and how Sidney is portrayed with gentle fun and sympathy as such an introvert. I have the second book and will be working on it, but I have a lot of other books in progress, too, so we'll see.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  • Like 13
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My books for the start of 2018 are the same as for the end of 2017; it's been a busy week. So instead, here's what the rest of the Crown family is reading.

 

Dh: Edith Wharton, Hudson River Bracketed

Great Girl: Mary Doria Russell, The Sparrow

Middle Girl: Graham Greene, The Heart of the Matter

Wee Girl: Sister Bernadette: Cowboy Nun from Texas

 

Wee Girl's book was an on-target gift from Great Girl; I've never seen her read so avidly.

  • Like 13
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Happy New Year! Welcome to those just joining us, and welcome back to those who've been gone a while.
 
I don't plan to join any challenges or bingo this year but that doesn't mean I don't have plans.

  • My Goodreads goal is set at 100. It will probably go up but since I plan to read a few chunksters this year I wanted to keep it low at least to start.
  • I plan to reread several of my favorites this year but haven't decided on which ones, other than definitely Middlemarch.
  • Inspired by Melissa M's post a week or two ago about Shakespeare in a Year, I found the 2018 schedule and started today.
  • While I want to read from my TBR shelves I won't pledge not to buy new books. There are often Kindle deals that I don't wish to pass up. I just plan to not start anything new until I finish all of my current reads, plus read at least two dusty books from my TBR list.

That's it. Simple goals. I never have a problem finding something to read. My only problem is what to read next out of the many, many books I want to read. :)
 
 
 

I’m starting my year with something historical but couldn’t wait to start and dove into Sharon Kay Penman’s 15th century history fiction novel -  The Sunne in Splendor – a couple day ago.  A dusty and chunky book which has been calling my name for some time.  
 
 
 

 

 



I hope enjoy it. It's a long one but worth the time, even if it takes a good while to get through it.
 
 

I'm attempting 52 books again this year and have decided to start off by rereading some of my favorites. First up is Wolf Hall, one of my all time best loved books.

 
I've been thinking about adding that one to my reread list, along with Bring up the Bodies. Actually, it would be re-listen. I own both on Audible.
 

And - this is a big one - I'm going to try to read while I eat breakfast/lunch instead of hanging out at the computer.  Our dining room table is at last free again as we created a giant crafting space for DD last week so she won't be colonizing the table with all her many large and involved projects (we hope!).  So I intend to intentionally sit down at the table to eat with a book in hand.
 
My word for the year is nourish, as in nourish myself both emotionally and physically and nourish the rest of my household members in the same way.

 
I've always been one to read while I eat. The cliche about reading the cereal box if there's nothing else certainly fits me. :)
 

I tend to read multiple books at one time. 

Currently reading for non-fiction: Washington by Ron Chernow. I've been working on this one for months. I read a few pages here and there.

 
 I always have several books going at once. When people ask me how I don't get them mixed up I compare it to being able to follow several different tv shows at once, with their different story lines.
 
I read Hamilton last year. That one took me months but I'm glad I read it. I added Washington to my ever growing TBR list.
 

One thing, it’s silly, but I get hung up on this: when I choose not to finish a book, I don’t know whether or not I get to count it. I’m just a stickler for detail and I feel I cannot “count†a book if I did not read it ALL. Do you “countâ€your DNFs? I tell myself it doesn’t matter, that the book-count police will not come arrest me for counting a book I did not finish, but then, sure enough, I am uneasy putting it on my tabulation if I DNF! There’s probably a medication for that...



I don't count books I didn't finish. I don't often abandon a book but when I do I don't feel guilty. Last week I cleaned up my Goodreads lists and shelves. I had a DNF shelf but deleted it. I decided it's enough work keeping a list of books I did read that I don't need to list the ones I didn't. 

  • Like 15
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been thinking a bunch about reading goals for the year. I'm going to try and copy ErinE's posting style here since it is always so neat and orderly. (I suspect that her desk at home has everything just so!)

 

 

I’m posting from my mobile otherwise I’d add a laughing emoji. I have a four year old and a three year old. Nothing is just so except the pantry and that’s because it has a lock. I added one after I discovered my younger two tossing handfuls of sugar in the air. I did spend many years creating client presentations. Old habits die hard.
  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I was going to start a book buying ban myself until Erin reminded me that SWBs new book is almost out so that was nice while it lasted. :)

 

Reading Murder on the Orient Express and listening to Braveing he Wilderness by Brene Brown.

.

 

I cheated. I pre-ordered when she first announced it. Does that count as buying now when the initial purchase was months ago? I would like to not buy any books for four months since I know I have enough books on hold and by my bedside to last.

  • Like 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can't wait to hear what you think of Sunne. It was my assigned reading from Kathy one year and I loved it. I think ErinE also read it. I just realized we now have two Erin's on this thread ... I actually think new Erin would enjoy it also. 

 

Sunne's actually been on my TR list since last year!  It was supposed to be my Middle Ages bingo square, but I picked something shorter as time was getting short.  What I picked instead was not so good... this is one of the reasons I'd like to pull back a bit on the pace again.  I started to get a bit too rushed around October... :lol:

 

I'm hoping to get to it early in the year!  

  • Like 12
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some currently free Kindle books ~

 

This one is until January 4 only: A Dangerous Madness  by Michelle Diener

 

Birdsongs (Benny James Mystery Book 1)  by Jason Deas

 

 

NOT FREE ~ $1.99: 

 

As You Wish: Inconceivable Tales from the Making of The Princess Bride by Cary Elwes

 

Dragons at Crumbling Castle: And Other Tales Terry Pratchett

 

 

Regards,

Kareni

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, goodness, I tried joining in back in 2016 and didn't make it.... before that, same thing, in about 2012/13?

 

So this year, I'm not going to put too much pressure on myself!!

So this year, I've set my Goodreads goal at 25 for the year.  I see people with so many more than that lol, but I'd rather start with this - which seems about like what I generally read anyway, maybe a little more - and then feel good about accomplishing it! :lol:  Then if I read more, all the better.  :)

 

 

Mostly I'm going to just go with the flow and read whatever strikes my fancy at the time.  I recently (as in yesterday) went through my goodreads list and checked to see what we have at our library... not a great outcome, but there are atleast 75 books that are on both lists, so it's definitely enough for quite some time for me.  Plus I have some at home that have yet been unread, and my SIL is a voracious reader who is always willing to let me borrow books if I ask!

 

 

I'm pretty sure I can handle some monthly challenges, at least I'm going to try.

I'm thinking I can do Armchair Travels, as there are some Haruki Murakami books on my list that I've been thinking of for awhile.  

Blossom Bookology also looks like a possibility.  I need to look at see what I have on my list that may work.

 

 

I've also convinced the kids to at least keep track of the books they read for the year.  No goals there, just for fun to see what a typical year for them looks like.  :)  Link (13) was like, 'But I can't remember all the books I've read this year!' and I was like.... 'It's January 1....'  *cue sheepish grin and 'ooooohhhhh right'*  :lol:

 

 

So I'll keep what I'm reading updated, and then each week I'll update how many the kids have read, just for kicks. :)

 

Right now I'm reading:

Outlaw by Ted Dekker - an easy read from my SIL's bookshelf 

Too Small to Ignore by Wess Stafford - which I keep forgetting about on my nightstand

 

Tomorrow is library day so I'll probably pick up a couple there.  

 

I'm excited to give it a go again!!!

  • Like 16
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I never manage to make it more than a few weeks, but I'm going to try very hard this year! 

 

I'm starting off my year with two gifts from dh. The first is The Illustrated Battle Cry of Freedom by James M. McPherson, which should take me quite a while. I'm currently in the middle of a Civil War obsession, so I was very happy to find this under the tree! 

 

Next is American Pictures Drawn with Pen and Pencil by the Rev. Samuel Manning, about the author's journey across the US by rail in the late 1800s, with many illustrations. Here is a digital text: https://archive.org/details/americanpictures00mann

This book came up in the recommendations when he was buying the previous book. He thought it looked interesting and liked the writing style, so decided to buy it for me. A perfect copy of this had just been sold for over $100, but he found a decent copy for much less. We have both really enjoyed what we have read so far. Dh didn't realize that I have a bit of an obsession with pretty much anything to do with the 19th - early 20th century, so this book was right up my alley. He also bought Scenic America: Beauties of the Western Hemisphere which has photographs with short descriptions of various locations in North and South America. As far as I can tell, I think this book was published around 1901. He thought it would be interesting to visit some of the locations and try to duplicate the photos. I think that is an amazing idea! I'm not counting this towards my 52 as it's more photos than text. 

 

 

I'm currently listening to Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie, narrated by Dan Stevens. I'm really enjoying his narration, especially the care he takes with voicing the different characters. 

 

I've been flipping between audiobooks for the last year, never quite finishing one, so I've decided to only have one going at a time. I have so many that I've never finished, so hopefully I can make some headway. I also changed my membership to one credit every other month. 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 15
Link to comment
Share on other sites

.

 

I cheated. I pre-ordered when she first announced it. Does that count as buying now when the initial purchase was months ago? I would like to not buy any books for four months since I know I have enough books on hold and by my bedside to last.

I think it counts in last years book buying total.

 

And I’m going to pretend I did that too. Haha!

  • Like 10
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I’m so glad to see so many new and familiar faces appearing on this thread! I know my list is really going to grow.

 

This is not pressure in the slightest to participate in any of the challenges but I want to make sure everyone knows you can count books in multiple challenges. For instance Murder on the Orient Express can be counted multiple ways.........Bingo, it could be the mystery or cozy.....Alphabetical by Author as C for Christie.......Alphabetical by Title as M for Murder.......Blossomology (?) it has E, M and O, depending on the flower of the month. So one book could be part of at least four challenges. Two years ago I did none of the challenges and am currently rather addicted.

 

Like others I have an abandoned shelf on Goodreads. I tend to put books on that shelf that I want to make sure I don’t find myself tempted to read again. I frequently return many after a few pages because they are due or not the right book for the mood I am in. These aren’t given the abandoned shelf treatment but may be removed from want to read lists. ;) I recently read one of my returned previously books and still didn’t love it. According to my kindle I quit around the 20% mark. It is part of a series that I plan to read this year. It needed to be read........I still did not like it.

 

If I am not loving a book I normally quit around 20% on my kindle. If it isn’t good by that point it normally doesn’t improve. I don’t count those in any form even if I read the last few pages. After the 50% mark I consider myself committed and always try to finish via skimming and skipping through. Normally I count those. Obviously 20% to 50% is a grey area. :)

  • Like 15
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm just trying to read more. Right now I've got to get through my library shelf. It's a toss up between reading a collection of short stories by Neil Gaiman Fragile Things or Erik Flint's Arkansas War. 

On the non-fiction side of things I'm working my way through Conflict and Suspense by James Scott Bell. Elements of Fiction Writing series.

  • Like 13
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm planning on rereading them both and then watch myself get really depressed over the fact that she's apparently never going to finish the series.   :crying:  I mean, she leaves me with this ridiculous fascination over Thomas Cromwell where I'm reading biographies and everything else about him I can these last years, and then has the nerve not to finish the series. The nerve.  :glare:

 

She's apparently been hanging out with George R. R. Martin. Game of Thrones fans are seriously annoyed with him.

  • Like 12
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...