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Lit resources- any hidden gems?


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So I've taught co-op classes with Lightning Lit, Excellence in Literature, Glencoe and Memoria Press Guides. I've looked very closely at Roman Roads and Oak Meadow and own some 7 Sisters guides. I have a couple of college level anthologies, and have bought and sold some high school ones. I have GC for Western Lit and the Odyssey. Have I missed anything? Anything from above I know I will end up rearranging or rewriting.

 

What is your favorite "hidden gem" for 10th-12th grade literature?

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I think the Garlic Press Discovering Literature Challenger level guides are quite meaty. They are for individual books, but I really like them:
- good background info on the author/times
- every chapter has a short summary, and some great discussion questions
- usually a good dozen 1-2 page lessons on a literary element or literature topic and how it's working in the novel
- lots of writing assignment ideas (which could also be used as class discussion ideas)
- additional resources and teaching suggestions
- answers in the back

Sadly, there are only a handful of titles available; I've used and liked the first 4 guides:
The Odyssey (Homer)
To Kill a Mockingbird (Lee)
The Giver (Lowry)
Lord of the Flies (Golding)
The Hobbit (Tolkien)
The Graveyard Book (Gaiman)
Hunger Games; Mocking Jay; Catching Fire (Collins)

Another great free resource are the Penguin Teacher Guides. (Sorry, for some reason the page is not loading so I can't link right now.)

Edited by Lori D.
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ETA:
Penguin Teacher Guides... 

Here are a few titles I found so that you can see what you think of the guides:
1984
Hamlet
Wuthering Heights
Great Expectations
The Grapes of Wrath
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Also, I found these Wikipedia resources to be helpful in understanding the background to a work/author/times:
List of Literary Movements (and then read the article on the movement)
Art Periods
History by Period

and, of course, Wikipedia articles about specific authors and/or works

Edited by Lori D.
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Great Courses has some great ones. How Great Science Fiction Works, Heroes and Legends: The Most Influential Characters of Literature, How to Read and Understand Shakespeare, A Day's Read (based on 36 short stories, preread!), Masterpieces of the Imaginary Mind, Classics of American Literature, Great Authors of the Western Literary Tradition. Those are just the ones in my Audible library. There are loads more, and whole series based on one book for works like Iliad, Odyssey, Dante's Divine Comedy, Canterbury Tales, etc.

Edited by SilverMoon
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Hi Lori,

I had to search for it using the teachers guides site:penguin.com but it came up. Hopefully this direct link will work:

 

http://www.penguin.com/services-shared/teachersguides/

 

These are probably as good as Lighting Lit.

 

The hard part for me (although I can do it) is scheduling this stuff. Right now I feel like my plan is, "First star to the left and straight on until dawn..."

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Great Courses has some great ones. How Great Science Fiction Works, Heroes and Legends: The Most Influential Characters of Literature, How to Read and Understand Shakespeare, A Day's Read (based on 36 short stories, preread!), Masterpieces of the Imaginary Mind, Classics of American Literature, Great Author's of the Western Literary Tradition. Those are just the ones in my Audible library. There are loads more, and whole series based on one book for works like Iliad, Odyssey, Dante's Divine Comedy, Canterbury Tales, etc.

 

I have the Great Author's one... How do you pace these?

 

I have a good anthology and a strong reader, but she'll skim if I don't give her some framework. Discussing is easy with this kiddo, and she's a pretty strong writer, so I can grab essays from various sources, but I'm not sure how much to cover.

 

When I'm "squishy" on my reading assignments "Read an hour from you book list" it doesn't get done if she doesn't do it before I go to work.

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Well, it really depended on the kid and that particular school year. Sometimes we used bits and pieces (especially Great Authors and American Lit) and others we used the lecture course to drive the schedule. I wrote different plans for each kid, but for each of them I did make a schedule that was as clear as "day 33: read chapters 18-21, day 34: listen to lecture 5" and so on. I printed out the whole schedule and it lived in the kids' master binder for that school year. While writing the schedule I'd decide which books we'd go deep into and which ones could just be read and discuss. Or even just read.

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On 12/20/2017 at 9:57 AM, MamaSprout said:

Hi Lori,
I had to search for it using the teachers guides site:penguin.com but it came up. Hopefully this direct link will work:
http://www.penguin.com/services-shared/teachersguides/

Ooh, good job on the searching! Alas, when I clicked on it, that link is also just spinning and spinning and not pulling up anything for me. 😞  I also tried inputting the "teachers guides site: penguin.com" and clicked on that link, which also just spun away without connecting. Wah... I broke the site. 😞

On 12/20/2017 at 9:57 AM, MamaSprout said:

The hard part for me (although I can do it) is scheduling this stuff. Right now I feel like my plan is, "First star to the left and straight on until dawn..."

I've been teaching mostly high school (some middle school) Lit. & Comp. co-op classes now for over 5 years, and I absolutely can NOT use some one else's curricula. I've tried. I can't help it... I am hardwired to pull the "best bits" from many sources, and synthesize it into my own lessons, geared specifically for the class of students I have each year.

However, it's a HORRIBLY time-consuming way to run a class, so if you can at all stick to a program and schedule it in a way that works for you, then you're way ahead of me! 🙂

Thought of another meaty individual guide: Portals to Literature. (Rainbow Resource also has some of these.) They are more expensive, and they are geared for a classroom, but they do have a lot in them. Sometimes you can find them cheaper used.

I also really liked the Parallel Shakespeare texts, teacher guides, and student workbooks, but there is probably way more in those than what you can use for a classroom, and there are only materials for about half a dozen Shakespeare plays.

Good luck! Warmest regards, Lori D.

Edited by Lori D.
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Great Courses has some great ones. How Great Science Fiction Works, Heroes and Legends: The Most Influential Characters of Literature, How to Read and Understand Shakespeare, A Day's Read (based on 36 short stories, preread!), Masterpieces of the Imaginary Mind, Classics of American Literature, Great Authors of the Western Literary Tradition. Those are just the ones in my Audible library. There are loads more, and whole series based on one book for works like Iliad, Odyssey, Dante's Divine Comedy, Canterbury Tales, etc.

We've been listening to select lectures from History of World Literature and it's another gem. I want to listen to it on my own time, for fun, when I, I mean DS, is done with finals.

Except the way the prof says "Montaigne". That really grates on my nerves and DS's as well,  and so skip that one :)

Edited by madteaparty
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Ooh, good job on the searching! Alas, when I clicked on it, that link is also just spinning and spinning and not pulling up anything for me. :(  I also tried inputting the "teachers guides site: penguin.com" and clicked on that link, which also just spun away without connecting. Wah... I broke the site. :(

 

LOL. Maybe try clearing your history and/or restarting your computer?

 

I've been teaching mostly high school (some middle school) Lit. & Comp. co-op classes now for over 5 years, and I absolutely can NOT use some one else's curricula. I've tried. I can't help it... I am hardwired to pull the "best bits" from many sources, and synthesize it into my own lessons, geared specifically for the class of students I have each year.

 

However, it's a HORRIBLY time-consuming way to run a class, so if you can at all stick to a program and schedule it in a way that works for you, then you're way ahead of me! :)

Yes! I've been doing this with my co-op class, but I usually start with something sort-of student directed. I want to tie next year into Ancients and Middle Ages, and frankly, there isn't much student directed material to be had. I've been thinking it's time to stop teaching this co-op class. I feel like my options are messy, time consuming, expensive or too religious.

 

Good luck! Warmest regards, Lori D.

 

Thanks, Lori!

 

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