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Has anyone ever made a Jaffa cake cake?


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One of my kids loves Jaffa cakes.  I saw some recipes on-line for a cake!  He would flip.  Problem is I am not entirely sure what some of the ingredients are exactly. 

 

https://realfood.tesco.com/recipes/giant-jaffa-cake.html

 

Like the pack of orange jelly.  I thought maybe this is jelly in a jar, but looking at the instructions it doesn't seem so.

 

Is there anyone who could "translate" this for me?  Or if you are in the US if you happen to have ever tried this...

 

 

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One of my kids loves Jaffa cakes. I saw some recipes on-line for a cake! He would flip. Problem is I am not entirely sure what some of the ingredients are exactly.

 

https://realfood.tesco.com/recipes/giant-jaffa-cake.html

 

Like the pack of orange jelly. I thought maybe this is jelly in a jar, but looking at the instructions it doesn't seem so.

 

Is there anyone who could "translate" this for me? Or if you are in the US if you happen to have ever tried this...

Jelly is Jello. Here it comes in a box of connected cubes that you cut apart to make the amount you want. It probably dissolves a bit faster if cut apart. Does the recipe require less than the normal amount of water? That would make it firmer. Edited by Laura Corin
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huh...

 

Ok...I guess nothing bad will happen if I try it!

Maybe you could do the Jello like the Jello jigglers recipe so it's more rubbery?

 

I would probably just use a very thick and dense jelly, like some of the Dickinson's preserves. The Jello thing sounds weird to me!

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Maybe you could do the Jello like the Jello jigglers recipe so it's more rubbery?

 

I would probably just use a very thick and dense jelly, like some of the Dickinson's preserves. The Jello thing sounds weird to me!

 

That's exactly what I was thinking.  Otherwise, you have to admit it sounds odd.  Like it would be way too soft. 

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Maybe you could do the Jello like the Jello jigglers recipe so it's more rubbery?

 

I would probably just use a very thick and dense jelly, like some of the Dickinson's preserves. The Jello thing sounds weird to me!

 

In US terms, it's definitely jello not jelly, otherwise it would be described as 'jam'.  But yes, I would reduce the water to make it stiff.

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In US terms, it's definitely jello not jelly, otherwise it would be described as 'jam'.  But yes, I would reduce the water to make it stiff.

 

I will always remember a birthday party at an English friend's house where I was asked if I wanted ice cream and jelly.  It was a cup half filled with jello, then a scoop of ice cream on top.  It was good, but definitely some kind of British comfort food!

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Orange jelly is orange jello, but British jelly/jello does not come in powder form, rather it is a very concentrated gel that you break into cubes and melt into the boiling water. Gogle orange jelly cubes and you'll get a better idea. I imagine for a jaffa cake cake you need a concentrated jello, so you could make regular orange jello using less liquid than normal with the powder.

 

Caster sugar is just slightly finer than regular American white sugar. For most cooking you can substitute regular sugar. 

 

Enjoy, and good luck!

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I understand that it's Jello -- it's just that the idea of putting Jello in a cake sounds odd to me. :)

 

Jaffa cakes aren't cakes in the traditional mould.  In fact there was some kind of dispute with the tax authorities about the definition of a cake that revolved around Jaffa cakes.  I don't like them myself because I don't like marmalade, but they are quite particular.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jaffa_Cakes#Categorisation_as_cake_or_biscuit_for_VAT

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I will always remember a birthday party at an English friend's house where I was asked if I wanted ice cream and jelly.  It was a cup half filled with jello, then a scoop of ice cream on top.  It was good, but definitely some kind of British comfort food!

 

It's standard children's party food.

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Jaffa cakes aren't cakes in the traditional mould. In fact there was some kind of dispute with the tax authorities about the definition of a cake that revolved around Jaffa cakes. I don't like them myself because I don't like marmalade, but they are quite particular.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jaffa_Cakes#Categorisation_as_cake_or_biscuit_for_VAT

I do know what it is, and it's just my own craziness that thinks it's weird -- especially because I have eaten cookies that were made exactly the same way (except with cookies as the base rather than cake,) and I loved those cookies!

 

In reality, I have no problem with putting a pudding layer in a cake, so Jello should be no big deal... but it is. :laugh:

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I will always remember a birthday party at an English friend's house where I was asked if I wanted ice cream and jelly. It was a cup half filled with jello, then a scoop of ice cream on top. It was good, but definitely some kind of British comfort food!

I will take that over an ice cream floating in disgusting root bear. 😂😂😂

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