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Associates degree, do you give a gift if your children got one?


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I didn't. It was nice to get it but in my mind it's not "the" degree.

Perhaps a girls' out afternoon?

 

ETA: Since this remark has annoyed some people, I'd like to clarify. If it is the person's terminal degree (for now at least), perhaps a gift is appropriate. If this person is transferring to a 4-year university, then I would save a "bigger" gift for this occasion.

 

Edited by Liz CA
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My oldest got an associates in business in May and is now at a 4-year, majoring in accounting.

 

I replaced his cell phone with one significantly better than his 3-year-old one. It's a lot better for checking assignments, and he's done a few meetings with it.

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does she plan on pursing a bachelors? (and for accounting I would absolutely encourage not only a bachelor's - but a masters/5th year to go towards a cpa.  2ds is working on this now.  huge difference in earning and employment potential.)

 

I would give something she can use with school/commuting/setting-up-her own apartment.

 

I don't think I did anything for ds - who transferred to the Uni to work towards a bsaae.  (he moved home.)

I didn't have much money to give my girls when they got their BA's - and 2dd got married a month before she got her Doc.   she got a wedding reception.   (I later gave her some money to put towards a viola.)

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I did not give my nephew a gift for an A.A. I did give my nieces (his sisters) gifts for their B.A.s.  In my immediate family we have B.A.s and professional degrees.  Even though I had to go to a cc to rehabilitate myself after a dismal H.S, ( enabling me  to  earn two highly selective degrees, ) I don't consider an A.A,  a real degree.  Just a stepping stone.

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I did not give my nephew a gift for an A.A. I did give my nieces (his sisters) gifts for their B.A.s.  In my immediate family we have B.A.s and professional degrees.  Even though I had to go to a cc to rehabilitate myself after a dismal H.S, ( enabling me  to  earn two highly selective degrees, ) I don't consider an A.A,  a real degree.  Just a stepping stone.

 

Wow. That's ridiculous.

 

Given that the OP was referring to an AAS, I'm guessing you don't consider those real degrees either. And the people who have them, like nurses, plumbers, mechanics, etc. must not have real jobs, either.  :001_rolleyes:

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I did not give my nephew a gift for an A.A. I did give my nieces (his sisters) gifts for their B.A.s.  In my immediate family we have B.A.s and professional degrees.  Even though I had to go to a cc to rehabilitate myself after a dismal H.S, ( enabling me  to  earn two highly selective degrees, ) I don't consider an A.A,  a real degree.  Just a stepping stone.

 

As a community college professor, I strongly disagree. Two-year schools most certainly are a valid educational option. Some students can't afford or actually prefer a 2-year degree. And mostly certainly doors can open with a two-year degree that wouldn't otherwise be available.

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As a community college professor, I strongly disagree. Two-year schools most certainly are a valid educational option. Some students can't afford or actually prefer a 2-year degree. And mostly certainly doors can open with a two-year degree that wouldn't otherwise be available.

 

I know a couple of people with two-year degrees in mechatronics. They make a ridiculous amount of money.

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As a community college professor, I strongly disagree. Two-year schools most certainly are a valid educational option. Some students can't afford or actually prefer a 2-year degree. And mostly certainly doors can open with a two-year degree that wouldn't otherwise be available.

 

I did not mean to ruffle your or Mergath's feathers. But, I was in California's community college system when it was at its zenith.  There is a lot of fluff in the AA degree--p.e., fine art, etc., and a simple "C' average,.  Any student who was planning on transferring did not strive for the a.a,,  but rather aimed for 60 U.C. transferable credits.  60 U.C. transferable credits and at least a   B+  average was a competitive applicant. anywhere. 

 

As to nursing, an AA is stepping stone to  a BSN. I don't know any mechanics with an AA in auto repair.  Thy all have manufacturer's certifications.

 

Just my point of view.  

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Wait. We’re supposed to give graduation gifts for college graduation? Paying for it isn’t the gift? Man, how did I miss this one? At least my daughter is just a Junior now and I haven’t blown it yet. Those stupid parenting books cover nothing after puberty!

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We did give DS#1 a gift when he completed his AAS degree in digital film & video production. And we attended his community college graduation. And again, we celebrated when he went on and completed his BA in a general humanities field. And we attended his university graduation. And the following year, we took DH out for a nice dinner and attended DH's graduation (out of state, as he was doing a long-distance mostly online program) when he earned his Master's of Fine Arts degree, which he did out of interest and for self-improvement, not for a job.

 

To us, the point was to rejoice with a loved one, and to take time to celebrate the accomplishment of completing a course of study in a way that was meaningful to the family member, no matter the "perceived beefiness" of the degree. :)

 

What would be meaningful to your student to celebrate earning the Associate's degree? Do that! :)

Edited by Lori D.
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Dd will be done this month with associates in applied science for accounting. I should probably think about a gift right? Suggestions if so?

If she's getting a job, a nice work outfit for interviews or her first day. If she's transferring, a sweatshirt from her new school (make sure you take the classic photo of her in her cap and gown unzipped to show the new school's shirt that every CC to university transfer student must take).

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...I was in California's community college system when it was at its zenith.  There is a lot of fluff in the AA degree... Any student who was planning on transferring did not strive for the a.a,,  but rather aimed for 60 U.C. transferable credits... and at least a   B+  average was a competitive applicant. anywhere. 

 

As to nursing, an AA is stepping stone to  a BSN. I don't know any mechanics with an AA in auto repair.  Thy all have manufacturer's certifications.

 

Fortunately, not all community college systems are alike. ;) Sad to hear the CA system wasn't that great. Hopefully that's changed since that time.

 

No fluff in the course load for the AA degrees from our local community college for students transferring to any of the state universities. In fact, it is recommended by many folks at the university that students at our local university take their math courses at the local community college for better instruction and smaller classes. Also, in a special agreement, a number of upper division courses in the Media Arts degree program at the local university are actually taught at the community college by the community college instructors, because the CC does a better job at it than the university. ;) It's a nationally-ranked university, but there are some things that the CC can do better.

 

 

Just for clarification for anyone interested:

 

The AA (Associate of Arts) degree is the stepping stone degree to a 4-year Bachelor's degree -- the "associate's to transfer degree". The credits for the AA degrees at our CC are general ed. requirements plus some intro-level courses in the degree field, and transfer to many 4-year universities.

 

The AAS (Associate of Applied Science) degree is the "degree direct to work" associate degree. Our community college offers both AA and AAS degrees. The core concentration courses are all direct experience, hands-on, and vocational-technical types of learning for the AAS. These include AAS degrees in everything from Computer Networking/Cyber Security, to Electronic Engineering, to Digital Arts and Graphic Design, to Dental Hygienist, to Radiological Tech, to Interpretation for the Deaf.

 

It is true that not all AAS degree programs (specificall the vo-tech fields) also have a related AA degree. But there are universities that do offer a Bachelor's degree in Automotive Technology. Our auto mechanic actually has a BS in Engineering because of his high personal interest in problem-solving. ;) So automotive mechanic is not just a certification field or an AAS degree field. :)

Edited by Lori D.
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I did not mean to ruffle your or Mergath's feathers. But, I was in California's community college system when it was at its zenith. There is a lot of fluff in the AA degree--p.e., fine art, etc., and a simple "C' average,. Any student who was planning on transferring did not strive for the a.a,, but rather aimed for 60 U.C. transferable credits. 60 U.C. transferable credits and at least a B+ average was a competitive applicant. anywhere.

 

As to nursing, an AA is stepping stone to a BSN. I don't know any mechanics with an AA in auto repair. Thy all have manufacturer's certifications.

 

Just my point of view.

There are many two year degrees that lead to fulfilling and well-paying jobs. The reason this kind of stuff ruffles my feathers is that we have so many people drowning in student loan debt because society keeps pushing the message that only a BA or BS matters, when so many people would be better off getting a two year degree from a tech school. Not because they couldn't handle a university or anything like that, but because we have a shortage of people with hands-on tech skills. There arent enough machinists and welders and so on.

 

And I have six years of university education under my belt, so I'm not saying this out of insecurity. ;)

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does she plan on pursing a bachelors? (and for accounting I would absolutely encourage not only a bachelor's - but a masters/5th year to go towards a cpa. 2ds is working on this now. huge difference in earning and employment potential.)

 

I would give something she can use with school/commuting/setting-up-her own apartment.

 

I don't think I did anything for ds - who transferred to the Uni to work towards a bsaae. (he moved home.)

I didn't have much money to give my girls when they got their BA's - and 2dd got married a month before she got her Doc. she got a wedding reception. (I later gave her some money to put towards a viola.)

She is starting in Feb on her BA & plans a masters as well.

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I ended up ordering her an abacus necklace & earrings of Etsy. I think she'll like it & it was in my budget. She's getting a nice padfolio from Amazon for Christmas as well that was on her wishlist. Wundermax Padfolio Portfolio with Bonus Writing Pad, Professional Interview PU Leather Padfolio with Zippered Closure, Interior 10.1 Inch Tablet Sleeve https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01CB6YQ8M/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_L37kAbXQDAKB5

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My son is transferring to a 4 year school.  He isn't completing the AA first because at this point, there are too many classes that won't transfer and it would be a waste of time, BUT, we still have made it a big deal.  For us, this is including getting him things he will need for the 4 year college, an expensive tablet, some dorm supplies, etc.....

 

But he doesn't want the pomp and circumstance.   He is content to just get something quietly.  I do hope he will go through the 4 year college graduation ceremony though.  

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The AA (Associate of Arts) degree is the stepping stone degree to a 4-year Bachelor's degree -- the "associate's to transfer degree". The credits for the AA degrees at our CC are general ed. requirements plus some intro-level courses in the degree field, and transfer to many 4-year universities.

 

The AAS (Associate of Applied Science) degree is the "degree direct to work" associate degree. Our community college offers both AA and AAS degrees. The core concentration courses are all direct experience, hands-on, and vocational-technical types of learning for the AAS. These include AAS degrees in everything from Computer Networking/Cyber Security, to Electronic Engineering, to Digital Arts and Graphic Design, to Dental Hygienist, to Radiological Tech, to Interpretation for the Deaf.

 

That's not correct, at least not for the CCs in my state.

 

AA and AAS degrees are both available for college transfer purposes. The difference is that the AA requires more hours in humanities/fine arts and social/behavioral sciences whereas the AAS requires more hours in math and natural sciences. The AAS college transfer degree is generally considered more challenging than the AA college transfer degree.

 

I think what you're doing is confusing the AAS degrees that are pretty much "direct to work" with college transfer AAS degrees. Or perhaps not all states offer AAS transfer degree programs? But the option certainly exists here.

 

Also, as far as "fluff" in CC degrees -- Yes, DS19 was required to take a PE class as a requirement for his AAS degree (which he earned as part of an early college high school program). That's because the two year college transfer degree requirements here are based on the requirements of our very well regarded "public ivy" state flagship. Which (you guessed it) has a PE requirement.  ;) We visited many four year schools, both public and private, who have a PE and/or a fine arts requirement. So those are certainly not considered "fluff" by the majority of four year schools we have experience with and are very common among many top schools nowadays.

 

OP, I think an actual gift or not is up to you. If this is your DD's terminal degree (even just for now), then yes, I would give one. If she has plans to transfer to a four year school soon then maybe not. But I think some sort of celebration is definitely in order -- special meal or a meal out, cake, etc. Congratulations to your DD!

Edited by Pawz4me
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Mine will be graduating with his AA in the spring. I'm sure we'll do something within our family to recognize it, but a "gift" isn't really a consideration--unless you count that we'll be happily paying for his next two years as he transfers to university.

 

If the AA were his ultimate goal and he wasn't planning to go any further, then yes, we'd be more focused on celebrating, including a gift.

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My mind is blown. Do people not celebrate high school graduation anymore because they want their kid to go to college? I'm not big on celebrations, I think elementary and middle school graduations are stupid but any college graduation is deserving of some type of commemoration. I figure once my kids are at that stage it is up to them where they take their life, some may have paths for college and some may end up with some other type of training or credentialing we'll celebrate them all. I'm not just going to single out my kids that get a Bachelor's degree as worthy of celebrating. Whether or not it is just a stepping stone for any kid it is an accomplishment in itself.

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I did not mean to ruffle your or Mergath's feathers. But, I was in California's community college system when it was at its zenith. There is a lot of fluff in the AA degree--p.e., fine art, etc., and a simple "C' average,. Any student who was planning on transferring did not strive for the a.a,, but rather aimed for 60 U.C. transferable credits. 60 U.C. transferable credits and at least a B+ average was a competitive applicant. anywhere.

 

As to nursing, an AA is stepping stone to a BSN. I don't know any mechanics with an AA in auto repair. Thy all have manufacturer's certifications.

 

Just my point of view.

All of those classes can be had at a four year university. They are called degree requirements.

 

Have you ever taken a fine arts course at a cc or uni? They are flat out hard. There is no fluff there - art is hard. If it wasn’t, then it would be much more commmon to have work placed in a show or museum. I can’t even. Oh, and art history. The subject that synthesizes technique, politics, religion, economics, math and science? The one that requires five papers plus a full research paper and an essay exam? Yeah, fluff all day long.

 

I’ll have to tell my sister, who has an AA and has been an RN for 30 years that she doesn’t have a real degree. Oh, I’m sure her employer and the state licensing board will want to know, too. Not to mention the thousands of patients she has cared for through the years. I’ll get right on that.

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There are many two year degrees that lead to fulfilling and well-paying jobs. The reason this kind of stuff ruffles my feathers is that we have so many people drowning in student loan debt because society keeps pushing the message that only a BA or BS matters, when so many people would be better off getting a two year degree from a tech school. Not because they couldn't handle a university or anything like that, but because we have a shortage of people with hands-on tech skills. There arent enough machinists and welders and so on.

 

And I have six years of university education under my belt, so I'm not saying this out of insecurity. ;)

I have a BA and I so, so agree with everything you said!

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And to answer the original question, my middle child will be graduating with his engineering degree (and already has a job--woo hoo!) this March and I haven't really thought about whether or not we are getting him a gift. He will be our first to graduate from college. We helped put him through, so I'm leaning toward no gift, but probably a family celebration. (Oldest did some CC and went into the Air Force; youngest is still taking classes at the local CC.)

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There are many two year degrees that lead to fulfilling and well-paying jobs. The reason this kind of stuff ruffles my feathers is that we have so many people drowning in student loan debt because society keeps pushing the message that only a BA or BS matters, when so many people would be better off getting a two year degree from a tech school. Not because they couldn't handle a university or anything like that, but because we have a shortage of people with hands-on tech skills. There arent enough machinists and welders and so on.

 

And I have six years of university education under my belt, so I'm not saying this out of insecurity. ;)

 

Not to mention that many times the CC is a great start, even if you plan to finish at the 4 year school.....economical, sometimes closer to home, etc...

 

I have said before that we actually have the option to give our kids a 4 year degree for only $20K total for tuition and fees.  

 

Our local community colleges are right around $2,500 per year and our local 4 year school is right around $7K per year.  No, this does not include books or transportation, but it does cover tuition and fees.   

 

Not bad.

 

PS:  I had a parent argue with me that if he lives at home I still have to pay room and board.  Um, our mortgage is due whether my kid lives here or not, and we may go down $2K per year in our food bill max with a kid gone.

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She is starting in Feb on her BA & plans a masters as well.

 

great for her. 

 

My son is transferring to a 4 year school.  He isn't completing the AA first because at this point, there are too many classes that won't transfer and it would be a waste of time, BUT, we still have made it a big deal.  For us, this is including getting him things he will need for the 4 year college, an expensive tablet, some dorm supplies, etc.....

 

But he doesn't want the pomp and circumstance.   He is content to just get something quietly.  I do hope he will go through the 4 year college graduation ceremony though.  

 

?huh?   if there are too many classes for a transfer degree that aren't transferring - that's a problem with your state college system.

 

 

That's not correct, at least not for the CCs in my state.

 

AA and AAS degrees are both available for college transfer purposes. The difference is that the AA requires more hours in humanities/fine arts and social/behavioral sciences whereas the AAS requires more hours in math and natural sciences. The AAS college transfer degree is generally considered more challenging than the AA college transfer degree.

 

I think what you're doing is confusing the AAS degrees that are pretty much "direct to work" with college transfer AAS degrees. Or perhaps not all states offer AAS transfer degree programs? But the option certainly exists here.

 

Also, as far as "fluff" in CC degrees -- Yes, DS19 was required to take a PE class as a requirement for his AAS degree (which he earned as part of an early college high school program). That's because the two year college transfer degree requirements here are based on the requirements of our very well regarded "public ivy" state flagship. Which (you guessed it) has a PE requirement.  ;) We visited many four year schools, both public and private, who have a PE and/or a fine arts requirement. So those are certainly not considered "fluff" by the majority of four year schools we have experience with and are very common among many top schools nowadays.

 

OP, I think an actual gift or not is up to you. If this is your DD's terminal degree (even just for now), then yes, I would give one. If she has plans to transfer to a four year school soon then maybe not. But I think some sort of celebration is definitely in order -- special meal or a meal out, cake, etc. Congratulations to your DD!

 

same here.   and they aren't all gen-ed either.  some are pretty specialized.  ds's aas in mech ed was no snooze fest.  

 

my girls went to an out of state top tier liberal arts college  - PE/swimming was *required*.   neither of my boys - who did the cc route first for money, had a required pe class.    

 

we took the boys to a nice dinner at a restaurant of their choice to acknowledge their efforts.

 

 

Not to mention that many times the CC is a great start, even if you plan to finish at the 4 year school.....economical, sometimes closer to home, etc...

 

I have said before that we actually have the option to give our kids a 4 year degree for only $20K total for tuition and fees.  

 

Our local community colleges are right around $2,500 per year and our local 4 year school is right around $7K per year.  No, this does not include books or transportation, but it does cover tuition and fees.   

 

Not bad.

 

PS:  I had a parent argue with me that if he lives at home I still have to pay room and board.  Um, our mortgage is due whether my kid lives here or not, and we may go down $2K per year in our food bill max with a kid gone.

 

it can be a good start depending upon the college system.  if they are meeting the requirements of the major state unis  (I'm getting the impression - from other places - some state's ccs. . . don't do a very good job of that.)  - great.  you are getting smaller class sizes which can be beneficial in lower level math and science.   some of the boys teachers are only teaching because they were bored in retirement, but were up there in their careers.  so lots of real world experience to share.  one thing ds didn't like was he had to start over at making a study group.  while three of his mech eng study group went to the uni - they are each doing a different branch of engineering.

 

and for room and board, they're taking showers, doing wash, and eating.  and using electricity and bandwidth for internet.   ds moved home after he'd received his award pkg.  he let them know, and the aid pkg. went down.   he'd been living with dd, and paid nothing in rent at her house

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We plan to celebrate-DD is doing the AA while in high school and sees it as a more "real" graduation than graduating with the local homeschool group. So, her plan is to graduate with the AA and send out announcements, etc for that, and, by the way, I also finished high school.

 

FWIW, she just took her final for SPanish 1 last week-which required two essays in Spanish and an oral exam with the instructor. Hardly an easy class, especially when you realize that this is intended for kids who did not have prior Spanish classes.

 

 

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There is a lot of fluff in the AA degree--p.e., fine art, etc., and a simple "C' average,.  Any student who was planning on transferring did not strive for the a.a,,  but rather aimed for 60 U.C. transferable credits.  60 U.C. transferable credits and at least a   B+  average was a competitive applicant. anywhere. 

How rude.

 

Never mind that C's get degrees almost everywhere.  In my state, if you get the AA/AAS, you get an auto accept to any of the state system schools.

 

PE and fine art as fluff, honestly.

 

 

 

 

Prarie-Phlox, that sounds really nice. What does an abacus necklace look like? 

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That's not correct, at least not for the CCs in my state.

 

AA and AAS degrees are both available for college transfer purposes. The difference is that the AA requires more hours in humanities/fine arts and social/behavioral sciences whereas the AAS requires more hours in math and natural sciences. The AAS college transfer degree is generally considered more challenging than the AA college transfer degree.

 

Nope, it is correct for the CCs in my state.

 

Perhaps your state does not have an AS degree? That is what we have here, which is the what you are describing above -- the AA requires more humanities/arts hours and transfers towards a BA, the AS requires more math/science hours and transfers towards a BS. (I did not include the AS in my post above, to avoid confusion with the AAS, but it happened anyways, lol  :laugh: )

 

AA = Associate of Arts (2 year degree towards transfer to a BA -- Bachelor of Arts 4-year degree)

AS = Associate of Science (2 year degree towards transfer to a BS -- Bachelor of Science 4-year degree)

AAS = Associate of Applied Science (2 year degree direct to work, with "applied" meaning hands-on, as in directly "applying" the content of the courses in an occupation)

 

(see the Wikipedia article for more on Associate degrees in the US and in other countries)

 

 

ETA -- PS

Another difference between the AS and AAS degrees offered in our state:

 

If wanting to go on and earn a Bachelor degree, it will take the student with the AAS degree 4 years, since almost all of the credits focused on applied/direct occupation coursework (which don't transfer as matching the core concentration credits needed for the Bachelor degree), and because only a very few gen. ed. credits required for the AAS. In contrast, the AS is designed to be about transfer, so the credits are the specific general ed. and introductory classes (100 and 200 level) required for the Bachelor degree, so only 2 years are needed at the university for the Bachelor degree.

 

On the other hand, if wanting to go to work after earning the 2-year degree, the student with the AAS has the requisite education and training to be employed upon graduation. So, the student can start right away as a radiology technician, diagnostic sonographer, physical therapy or vetrinary tech, dental hygienist, computer network or cyber security administrator, etc. In contrast, the student with the AS lacks the requisite education and training and is not employable in the medical or science field until completing a Bachelor degree.

Edited by Lori D.
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My first AA degrees was in general education and it was fluff. The classes didn’t have to be, but that particular community college was focused on remediation, not rigor. My English comp class required one 4-5 page paper. The whole school was like that. I got the credits and they transferred to the LAC of my choice, wiping out my gen Ed’s. But I didn’t learn a thing.

 

My B.A. was challenging and rigorous. But it was at a semi selective LAC and they prided themselves on challenging coursework.

 

My second A.S. Was a paramedic degree and allowed me to sit for the state certification. It was also difficult and challenging, requiring vast amounts of clinical time and study. I celebrated that graduation. It’s also the only degree that’s ever earned me money.

 

So it depends. Some degrees and schools really are fluff but I don’t think you can determine that from the degree itself.

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I ended up ordering her an abacus necklace & earrings of Etsy. I think she'll like it & it was in my budget. She's getting a nice padfolio from Amazon for Christmas as well that was on her wishlist. Wundermax Padfolio Portfolio with Bonus Writing Pad, Professional Interview PU Leather Padfolio with Zippered Closure, Interior 10.1 Inch Tablet Sleeve https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01CB6YQ8M/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_L37kAbXQDAKB5

That sounds perfect!

I was going to suggest some sort of tablet or jewelry.

Nan

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There are many two year degrees that lead to fulfilling and well-paying jobs. The reason this kind of stuff ruffles my feathers is that we have so many people drowning in student loan debt because society keeps pushing the message that only a BA or BS matters, when so many people would be better off getting a two year degree from a tech school. Not because they couldn't handle a university or anything like that, but because we have a shortage of people with hands-on tech skills. There arent enough machinists and welders and so on.

 

And I have six years of university education under my belt, so I'm not saying this out of insecurity. ;)

 

one message I would really like to see pushed - is when it comes to actually getting a job, the *specific* BA or BS matters.  there are so many "not" marketable degrees out there.  e.g. I cringe when I've had people proudly tell me their child got a ba in general studies.  (then later they have to go somewhere to learn something in which they can actually get a job that pays money to support their family.)

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I did not give my nephew a gift for an A.A. I did give my nieces (his sisters) gifts for their B.A.s.  In my immediate family we have B.A.s and professional degrees.  Even though I had to go to a cc to rehabilitate myself after a dismal H.S, ( enabling me  to  earn two highly selective degrees, ) I don't consider an A.A,  a real degree.  Just a stepping stone.

 

So what does that mean if someone in your family decides to take a different path that doesn't require a BA or professional degree?  Or who has issues (disabilities, etc) which make getting such a degree too difficult to pursue?

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Nope, it is correct for the CCs in my state.

 

Perhaps your state does not have an AS degree? That is what we have here, which is the what you are describing above -- the AA requires more humanities/arts hours and transfers towards a BA, the AS requires more math/science hours and transfers towards a BS. (I did not include the AS in my post above, to avoid confusion with the AAS, but it happened anyways, lol  :laugh: )

 

AA = Associate of Arts (2 year degree towards transfer to a BA -- Bachelor of Arts 4-year degree)

AS = Associate of Science (2 year degree towards transfer to a BS -- Bachelor of Science 4-year degree)

AAS = Associate of Applied Science (2 year degree direct to work, with "applied" meaning hands-on, as in directly "applying" the content of the courses in an occupation)

 

(see the Wikipedia article for more on Associate degrees in the US and in other countries)

 

My dd's cc also has an AES - Associate of Engineering Science that transfers toward an engineering 4 year degree. 

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So what does that mean if someone in your family decides to take a different path that doesn't require a BA or professional degree?  Or who has issues (disabilities, etc) which make getting such a degree too difficult to pursue?

 

yeah.  dh has two nephews - one has multiple music degrees.  one is a high school drop out.  guess who makes MUCH more money?  it's not who you'd think by looking at their formal education.

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