Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

Dotwithaperiod

Brown University

Recommended Posts

That's the case at Princeton (and I believe Harvard and Stanford as well?). One can get loans from the university if desired, but the official packages are all scholarship money. I love it.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's the case at Princeton (and I believe Harvard and Stanford as well?). One can get loans from the university if desired, but the official packages are all scholarship money. I love it.

I wonder if the EFC calculation done by Brown will now be closer to the EFC determined by Harvard and Princeton, too?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For such a prestigious meets-need school like Brown, would the loans typically part of a package that is not intended to cover any portion of EFC probably just be federal student loans?  So that they're probably talking 5-7k more per year per recipient?    Replacing federal student loans with scholarships is a nice change of course, but that's not where the big burden usually lies, no?

 

And why do they use the term scholarship rather than grant? (GPA requirements?)  Just thinking out loud.  ETA, the press release mostly uses the term scholarship but later uses the term grant.

 

From the press release, the message is a little confusing.  This implies a lower EFC:
 

By replacing all packaged loans with grant funds that do not have to be repaid, The Brown Promise represents the next major step. The move is a direct response to the challenges faced by families with moderate incomes, who often do not qualify for the generous financial aid offered to low-income families by Brown and some other universities, yet also do not have the full resources to cover the cost of attending college.

 

On the other hand:

 

The elimination of loans in University financial aid packages through The Brown Promise will apply to all Brown undergraduates who receive financial aid.

 

If they already "receive financial aid," how does that help those "who often do not qualify for the generous financial aid"?

Edited by wapiti
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe many of the Ivy Leaugue schools use the term scholarship when it is really grants. You will often hear that a student got a full-ride to an Ivy League school and it usually just means they qualified for full need.

 

Also, I think some schools like Brown do not include loans in the FA packages of the students with the highest need. So I think this is more helping the next level up of student who had loans as part of their package. Now those will be grants instead. And so then if the family can't meet their EFC, at least the loans to do that won't be in addition to loans in the FA package.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For such a prestigious meets-need school like Brown, would the loans typically part of a package that is not intended to cover any portion of EFC probably just be federal student loans?  So that they're probably talking 5-7k more per year per recipient?    Replacing federal student loans with scholarships is a nice change of course, but that's not where the big burden usually lies, no?

 

And why do they use the term scholarship rather than grant? (GPA requirements?)  Just thinking out loud.  ETA, the press release mostly uses the term scholarship but later uses the term grant.

 

From the press release, the message is a little confusing.  This implies a lower EFC:

 

 

On the other hand:

 

 

If they already "receive financial aid," how does that help those "who often do not qualify for the generous financial aid"?

 

 

My guess is that full-pay students are still full-pay.  They're talking about students who get some FA already, I guess.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...