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Kendall

Precalculus text options

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I used Forerster with my oldest 3. My two daughters might need something a little less difficult, though I could probably modify Foerster.  But I also would like to explore options that aren't as graphing calculator heavy. 

 

I'm not interested in Saxon and AoPS would be too hard,especially since they have had very little AoPS exposure. 

 

What texts current or out of print would you suggest that I look at?

 

Thanks,

Kendall

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Dh used the 5th edition of Precalculus A Right Triangle Approach by Lial, et al.   Amazon has used copies of several editions.

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Lial maybe?  My ds used Lial's Precalculus 3rd edition** with his online precalculus course a number of years ago. It is not graphing calculator intensive at all--you don't even need a graphing calculator, and ds's course did not use them. The text has some problems you can do on a graphing calculator, but these are optional.  FWIW, my ds has never owned or used a graphing calculator! (And he has a master's in Comp Sci). He did use some graphing software in calculus at home and advanced calc courses at college, but not in precalc.

 

**If you're interested, I do still have my Lial Precalculus text and the complete Solution Manual that goes with it, which I would be happy to sell. Both are in excellent condition. The text looks like this: https://www.amazon.com/Precalculus-plus-MML-Student-Starter/dp/032123815X/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1512095971&sr=8-6&keywords=lial+precalculus+3rd+edition

 

 

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If you don't mind vintage texts, one of my kids really enjoyed "Pre-Calculus Mathematics," by Shanks, Brumfiel, Fleenor, and Eicholz. Here's one: https://www.amazon.com/Pre-Calculus-Mathematics-M-Shanks/dp/0201007088/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1512098330&sr=1-1&refinements=p_27%3AFleenor%2C+Brumfiel+Shanks

 

And here's the Table of Contents: Real Numbers and Coordinates; Functions and their Graphs; Polynomials; Exponential and Logarithmic Functions; The Circular functions; Applications of the Circular Functions; Analytic Trigonometry; Inverse Circular Functions and Trigonometric Equations; Functions on the Natural Numbers; Probability; The Plane; Vectors in the Plane; Space; Vectors in Space; Angles, Lines, and Planes; Linear Equations, Determinants, Matrices; Circles, Cylinders, and Spheres; Conics; Other Coordinate Systems; Parametric Representation of Curves and Surfaces; The Problem of Tangents and the Problem of Areas.

 

It's not an easy book by any means, but it's very thorough (I'm no expert, but I think it goes well beyond some contemporary precalc books in terms of topic coverage), the problems are interesting, and there is no graphing calculator material in it at all, if that is the kind of thing you are wanting.

 

Hope that helps!

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Most college textbooks should fit the bill. I like Lial's because it's available in an option that starts with right triangle trigonometry and I prefer that approach.  

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You could also look at the Larson texts. Larsonprecalcus.com has lots of helps, solutions, and videos. I have an older version on my shelf, so I bought the solutions manual too, but I was able to match it with one of the editions there, otherwise. I figure if we need more help, I can get a coolmathguy.com subscription.

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http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/topic/542418-homeschooling-high-school-math/?do=findComment&comment=6191110

 

I have Forerster, Brown, Sullivan Precalc texts

They all have pluses and minuses.

 

I would probably recommend Sullivan for you (buy an older edition - quite inexpensive).

I have never used Lial.

 

I also tutored someone that used Demana.  It seemed OK.

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We used a free text from university of Washington. It's a basic "here's the background you need for calculus" text. Scientific calculator required, but not designed for a graphing calculator.

 

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON MATH 120

Textbook: Precalculus by D.H. Collingwood, K.D. Prince and M. M. Conroy

Note: Focus on problem solving and multi-step problem solving and on preventing common problems that trip up UW calculus students.

Online Class? No. Some teaching assistant at a whiteboard videos here https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3EadMDqZmJVJ2f43QSzIRQ/playlists?shelf_id=0&view=1&sort=dd

Where to buy: Free download. http://www.math.washington.edu/~m120/

Teacher Guide/Additional Materials: Answers, but not worked solutions, in the back of the book. Sample tests and quizzes at above website as well.

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http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/topic/542418-homeschooling-high-school-math/?do=findComment&comment=6191110

 

I have Forerster, Brown, Sullivan Precalc texts

They all have pluses and minuses.

 

I would probably recommend Sullivan for you (buy an older edition - quite inexpensive).

I have never used Lial.

 

I also tutored someone that used Demana.  It seemed OK.

 

From your other posts, you seem familiar with a lot of textbooks. Do you have an opinion on the Larson books?

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From your other posts, you seem familiar with a lot of textbooks. Do you have an opinion on the Larson books?

Larson has so many textbook variants out there it is hard to say but what I have seen they are pretty middle of the road rigor-wise. They have a fair amount of freebies such as videos.

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Thank you so much everyone! You've given me some texts to look at.

 

It is embarrassing to report that I had a Lial's 4th edition and solutions manual on my shelf in the basement. I knew I had purchased an inexpensive text a year ago when I started anticipating this issue, but I thought it was Larson without a solutions guide. 

 

Thoughts on this anyone?  One amazon review criticism said "Straightforward and clear, although a bit too calculation focused. IMO, the book doesn't teach good problem-solving skills, and isn't that the reason to learn math? I would definitely not recommend. I would recommend Foerster's Precalculus or Ronald Brown's Precalculus. If you just want to learn to calculate things, use Khan Academy for free, which will do that and much more -- and you won't get misled with misleading problems."

 

 

 

Mark - If you have time, tell me why you say Sullivan for me and also do you have opinions about the graphing calculator aspect of Foerster? 

 

BTW I do want a solutions guide or at least answers, but I will be teaching this so I don't need online or video options. 

 

I also realized that I need to think about doing trig first regardless of text because one of the daughters will probably take College Algebra the 2nd semester and won't get trig otherwise. On the other hand she will need the non trig portion of precalc to help her get ready for College Algebra. She wouldn't have to have trig but it doesn't seem right to me not to give trig to her because trig is fun and I think everyone should do some. College Algebra is all she will need for any major she is/would consider and math is very hard for her.

 

Decisions, decisions... 

 

 

 

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"Too calculation focused?" Well, probably, if you're looking for a theoretical text or an honors text. It's definitely more for the people who need to be shown how and practice what they were shown. It's ... average. Not honors. Not super basic. But it won't make students prove the rules of logarithms or anything. 

 

If you have the right triangle version of Lial's, you can do the first chapter of trig without much algebra, if you want to do that first. I'd also make sure that you do functions (there are so many students who will happily write f(x+y) = f(x) + f(y)) and also that you hit logarithms/exponentials because those topics absolutely slaughter students in college algebra and some preview will help a LOT. 

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Thanks for the tips on specific topics to review. We are just starting the log/exponent chapter of Foerster Algebra 2 and have worked with functions. If we do trig first I'll keep some review of those topics going and see what else the precalc book adds to the topics.

 

Really, at least one of my girls needs average. Thinking this through more, I either need to adjust down an honors type text for one girl or beef up an average one for the other. I think an average text with some supplementing would be enough for the stronger one. Maybe I should do different texts, but the thought of two teach times with different texts is not appealing since I have 3 younger ones that need me, too.  I personally wouldn't mind doing math all day...  I'm avoiding a writing session with my 11th grader by writing this post.   Back to work.

 

 

Edited by matermultorum
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Mark - If you have time, tell me why you say Sullivan for me and also do you have opinions about the graphing calculator aspect of Foerster? 

 

BTW I do want a solutions guide or at least answers, but I will be teaching this so I don't need online or video options. 

 

I have the fifth edition Sullivan 

https://www.abebooks.com/9780130954022/Precalculus-5th-Edition-Michael-Sullivan-0130954020/plp

 

Derek Owens uses the 4th edition:

https://www.derekowens.com/course_info_precalculus.php

 

Maybe because it is from 1999 that it seems to be less calculator dependent.

The explanations and examples are clear to me.

Not a lot of theory if that is what you are looking for probably similar to Lial.

 

I like to use multiple texts.

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