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Thanks!  I just did that.  The lady there told me that the deadline for the class of 2018 was October 15, 2017, and that the selections for this class are now finalized.  They will not add any further students.  She gave me instructions how to move the twins up, if desired.  (Please post here if anyone would like to see those instructions.)

 

We have several other avenues to pursue for DS18.

 

For now I think I want to get him out of his room and out of this house.  Perhaps some Christmas shopping is in store!

 

Just curious which college places such an emphasis on NM?  Or is NM status important because of a company scholarship through National Merit?  (You don't have to answer, obviously, if the question is too personal) 

 

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My sophomore took it this year partly to practice (outside of the CAT this is the only national test he's ever taken) and partly because he'd like to participate in a local dual enrollment program next year that requires a PSAT score.  He scored a 1470, which from the report looks like a nice score so everybody is happy here today :).

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We have several other avenues to pursue for DS18.

 

For now I think I want to get him out of his room and out of this house. Perhaps some Christmas shopping is in store!

Good luck on your other avenues.

:grouphug: to your DS18. My younger boy was demoralized at one point in time so I can empathize :(

Hope he enjoys Christmas shopping

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DS14 (9th) took the PSAT this year - we're wondering if he might possibly be in the running for NMSF for his official 11th grade test. Those of you seasoned, what do you think is a reasonable anticipated amount of score improvement between 9th-11th grade? How many questions - approximately - would a student be able to miss? We're in TN - this year's SI cutoff was 218. We're just getting familiar with PSAT/SAT test-taking & scoring so any info would be helpful. So, would it be un/reasonable to anticipate an improvement of 5 SI points? 10? 15? 20? more? over the course of 2 years? 

 

I know this can vary according to what needs work/test taking strategies/etc. Let's say if there are decent, but room-for-improvement test-taking strategies in place, no problem completing the exam, no outside prep, with just honors/AP curriculum choices. What might be an anticipated score change? We're trying to determine just how much energy needs to be devoted to test prep vs how much will come with his studies, & we're trying to determine if NMSF is even something to gun for. Thoughts?

 

My DD's SI improved 20 points from her 10th to 11th grade test dates, so I think it's very possible for your DS to increase 20 or more points in two years.

 

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Just curious which college places such an emphasis on NM?  Or is NM status important because of a company scholarship through National Merit?  (You don't have to answer, obviously, if the question is too personal)

 

There are several schools throughout the country which reward National Merit Finalists with very high scholarships.  I believe University of Arizona and University of Alabama are two such schools.  Alabama is where DS15 might end up.  DS18 is almost certainly going to Liberty University.  They offer a full tuition scholarship to NM Commended students (worth about $64,000) and full tuition plus room and board to NM Finalists (worth about $128,000).

 

DS18 still qualifies for an SAT-based scholarship worth about $6500/year, but we will need to look for other sources, as well.

 

(And, BTW, it is still possible that the cutoff for commended will remain at 211, but we cannot count on that happening.)

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It is required. I tried leaving it blank and got an error message. <sigh> Nothing I’ve entered has worked and I don’t see an “Other†or “my school not listed†option, either. Grrr...frustrating.

 

When my daughter filled it out this morning she left it blank and checked the box below it that said "my school is not listed." That made it no longer required.

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Dd got the same composite score as last year, but because her math score is slightly higher and her english score is slightly lower, her selection index went down, lol.  

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So how do we find out what the cut off for National Merit contention is in our state for the current year?  We're in NY so I assume it requires a relatively competitive score but ds 15 is a sophomore this year so his score doesn't count towards NMS until next year.  His index score this year is a 219. 

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The cut-offs aren't officially released, to my knowledge, except to school officials. The Compass Prep blog will keep abreast of them as news trickles out in late August and early September 2018.

Kids take the test in fall of their Junior year, but don't find out until fall of their Senior year if their selection index is at or above the level required for NMSF for their state. Congrats to your son on a great score and good luck to him next fall on his "official" try.

So how do we find out what the cut off for National Merit contention is in our state for the current year?  We're in NY so I assume it requires a relatively competitive score but ds 15 is a sophomore this year so his score doesn't count towards NMS until next year.  His index score this year is a 219. 

 

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We are pleased with my daughter's score. It was nothing phenomenal, but we were not expecting that. I do not anticipate National Merit on the horizon for any of my kids, lol; we are just average people :001_smile: Her PSAT score was in the 75th percentile (and was almost exactly the same score I got on the SAT many, many years ago), so I think she did just fine for a sophomore.

 

It was her first standardized test ever, so seeing that she surpassed the college readiness benchmarks for a 10th grader gave me some reassurance that I haven't totally messed her up by homeschooling her, lol.

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My son took the PSAT last year in 9th grade and got a very so-so score. A little lower than I was hoping, but expected considering the circumstances: he'd never taken a test like that in that setting, we did zero prep, and he was a little confused about what the test was all about anyway. The only reason I had him take it was to get experience in what it was like to take a test like that in a roomful of strangers.

 

We tried having him take two subject tests at the end of last year, but I waaaaaaaay misunderstood what level of prep is involved in those and it didn't go well. :( That was my fault. I read too many goofy comments online that said things like, "I never even prepared at all and got a perfect score!" Either those people were lying or they really are brilliant. Which is fine! Brilliant people do exist...but it wasn't our story and I didn't properly prepare my student because I didn't realize how hard those tests are. :(

 

So, here we are in 10th grade. I signed him up for the PSAT again just for practice with no prep. Being a homeschooler, I feel it is important for him to have as many experiences in a strange testing environment as is reasonable before the test scores matter. His peers are experts at test taking and he's a rookie.

 

He got 20 points (oops, correction--I posted this and then a couple of hours later realized it was 110 points higher) higher than the last time and so we're pretty happy. Very happy! He's not in some upper stratosphere with scores, but we are pleased with where he is, especially with no official prep.

 

Next year, he'll do some prep and hopefully he'll get a nice score. We aren't expecting national merit or tippy top scores for elite colleges. I am at the point where I just want him to do his best and I firmly believe he'll be fine. If we were looking at tippy top colleges I would worry, but we're not.

 

I just wanted to share that because I can get discouraged with reports of people's 2nd graders taking the PSAT without prep and getting perfect scores. I try to stay away from those stories now and thought I'd share our experiences with a student who doesn't naturally score high on tests right out of the gate.

Edited by Garga
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It was her first standardized test ever, so seeing that she surpassed the college readiness benchmarks for a 10th grader gave me some reassurance that I haven't totally messed her up by homeschooling her, lol.

 

 

This is our story, too!  In 9th grade, he was juuuuust under the benchmark for the math portion.  And now in 10th grade, he's over it, so we're happy.  With some prep, I think he'll have a nice score in 11th grade.

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I just wanted to share that because I can get discouraged with reports of people's 2nd graders taking the PSAT without prep and getting perfect scores.  I try to stay away from those stories now and thought I'd share our experiences with a student who doesn't naturally score high on tests right out of the gate.

 

thanks for your candor.

 

i agree, i think it can be hard to hear. but i think that we're only hearing about the stellar scores - that the lower-lying fruit aren't posting scores (whether it be PSAT, SAT, SAT II, or AP) b/c they're not scoring perfectly. my 10th grader has a bunch of PS friends, and it's been reassuring to see how they are scoring on the PSAT (10th & 11th graders). 

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Oh & Rootann pointed me to a post at CC relating people's scores with their SI (a bit relative, as it will depend on your exact breakdown of English and Math - but here's what I came up with for those trying to gain NMSF for their state's cut-off. Just a ballpark estimate anyway)

 

In case anyone else like me was wondering as we plan for 11th grade, where it all matters, to see how far a boost up we may need.

 

Others Scores/SI correlation:

 

CA SI 225 / Score 1500

1510 and a 226 SI

220 (1470 - 730+740)

1500, SI 224, California

221 index -1480 (750M/730E)

1480 760 Math, 720 EBRW Selection Index: 220

(1440, SI 217)

1510 - SI 226

1470 (760 math, 710 RW) with a selection index of 218

1470 (720, 750) and NMSC selection index 219

1450 (700 and 750) with 215

S19 studied all summer and got a 1540 on the August SAT and got a 1470 on the PSAT! His SI is 221 

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I'd give it a try. DD was texting with a friend in Texas. When he learned that she had gotten her scores, he went online and got his, too. Somehow. Even though they aren't due to be released until later. She didn't ask him how he did it.

 

ETA: Apparently he used a VPN.

 

We got DD's scores this evening via a VPN.  When I saw mention of that here, I asked hubby to log on to his work computer which uses VPN, and we were able to access her scores a day early.  My oldest then told me that there are some free trials out there for VPN's, so if you just can't stand the wait...

 

DD scored very well, though she is just under what we expect the cutoff to be.  I am so proud of her.  It was her first standardized test and I know she was a bit nervous.

 

Good luck to all!

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Is anyone here in Indiana?  We don't have our scores yet...Waiting, oh, so, impatiently.  :)

 

In KY.  It should be there today, but it's not showing up yet.   :toetap05:

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D got her scores, Her verbal score on the PSAT was exactly the same as her Nov SAT score. Since the scales are different, I don't know if that means she did worse on the PSAT vs the SAT or not. (Her SAT math score was higher only because of the different scales)  Had her verbal and math scores been reversed, she would be in the running, but her SI is not going to make it in our state. 

 

If you have a student that is interested in the schools that offer big scholarships to NM, I would definitely focus more on the verbal than the math as the verbal score is much more important for this competition.

 

Congratulations to everyone who is happy with their scores and (hugs) to those who were disappointed.

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In KY.  It should be there today, but it's not showing up yet.   :toetap05:

 

 

If you get desperate, I could always log in for you! I could be your Own Private VPN!  :laugh:

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In KY.  It should be there today, but it's not showing up yet.   :toetap05:

 

We are in VA, and our scores weren't accessible this morning, either. I called the CollegeBoard and they got me access immediately. The scores weren't showing up because dd's info was linked to 2 accounts - the one for the school where she took the test, and her own CollegeBoard account. So you might be able to get scores with a phone call if there is a similar issue!

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For those of you who haven't gotten scores yet that should have, you might try calling the college board.  Evidently, for us at least, the paper registration wasn't "linked" with the online account but it was difficult to understand the CB rep with a foreign accent.  The CB rep fixed it.  Our scores also showed up in the PSAT/NMSQT tab.  I expected it to be under the PSAT10 tab since our daughter is a sophomore.   My call went right through an hour ago but it did take quite a while to fix things on their end.

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Also keep in mind that College Board, in its infinite wisdom, explicitly designed the PSAT to allow for score growth between now and the time the student would typically take the SAT in the spring or next fall.  So I would NOT interpret the PSAT to be the final indicator on what the student's SAT score might be, even though it was designed to indicate what the score would be if the SAT was taken that day (am I making this clear or am I being confusing?).  It'll depend on the kid, but I read someplace that growth of 100 pts might not be unusual, or some range 50-150.

 

Scores can absolutely shift! When my oldest dd took the PSAT (fall 2011), her math score was below where she and I knew it could be. She took the SAT five months later and raised her math score by ~200 points, just by spending some time working through SAT math practice problems 4-5 days/week. I should mention that she did only a little prep for the PSAT, so that was a factor. But my point is that once she had that PSAT score, she was able to focus in on certain things and make gains in her SAT score. Similar situation for my oldest ds (PSAT fall 2013, SAT spring 2014), although his area of focus/score raising was in reading comprehension.

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I got distracted from the reason I initially got on this thread, which was to say that we are very happy with dd's score! All smiles this morning. I HATE these standardized tests, so it is some consolation to me when we are happy with the scores.  :lol:

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For those of you who haven't gotten scores yet that should have, you might try calling the college board.  Evidently, for us at least, the paper registration wasn't "linked" with the online account but it was difficult to understand the CB rep with a foreign accent.  The CB rep fixed it.  Our scores also showed up in the PSAT/NMSQT tab.  I expected it to be under the PSAT10 tab since our daughter is a sophomore.   My call went right through an hour ago but it did take quite a while to fix things on their end.

 

The PSAT10 is a completely different test.

 

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Victory!! I was *finally* able to set up an account using the homeschool code Reg provided.

 

For all you patient, experienced HS parents thanks so much for advice. Now, to wait for the scores.

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DS is in public school 9th grade, so they signed him up for the PSAT 10. Is there anyway to get a scoring index from those scores? Or are those only valid for the PSAT/NMSQT? 

And surprisingly, he has always tested way higher in math than any reading or writing test, but was slightly higher in reading on this one. I think that's a good sign for future test taking for him.

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DS's scores went down slightly.   He's in 10th grade, so none of his PSAT scores count for anything yet, but his math stayed the same while his verbal score went down 40 points from his 9th grade PSAT.   I'm now very interested to see his SAT scores.   He took the PSAT in October, then did a 6-week prep course through the end of November, then took the December 2 SAT.   Those SAT scores should be released some time next week, so at least we won't have to wait as long....

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The PSAT10 is a completely different test.

 

The test content is the same.  There are just different percentiles for 10th graders.  PSAT/NMSQT is the name for the fall version, PSAT10 the spring version, but they are the same.

 

The PSAT/NMSQT and PSAT 10 are the same test, offered at different times of year. 

https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/psat-nmsqt-psat-10/taking-the-tests/compare-psat-nmsqt-psat-10

Edited by wapiti
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DS is in public school 9th grade, so they signed him up for the PSAT 10. Is there anyway to get a scoring index from those scores? Or are those only valid for the PSAT/NMSQT?

 

It depends on what you mean by valid.  They don't count for NMSQT, but sure, you can calculate a selection index (reading, writing, and math scores, each out of 38, added together and doubled).

Edited by wapiti
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So... I began to get excited about DD's scores when she received unsolicited mail from Vanderbilt last week.  PonyGirl didn't think much of it, until I pointed out what the typical student profile is.  Her PSAT scores did not disappoint.  She's just in 10th, so this was the last go-around from practice.  Happily, she did equally well on the Verbal as she did on the math (which also surprised her).  She is not far off from NMSQ range.  Given the mental state she was in when starting the test, we both believe she could have done even better (she was sent to the wrong classroom, and had to wait about 40 minutes for a new testing room assignment, but when she arrived, they did not have a seat for her -- so she had to run and locate a desk and carry it back).  Given where she is swimming-wise, having a predicted score her junior year in the statistically perfect range puts her in a perfect position for a great school academically and a great place to swim.  Two service academies have already contacted her (swimming).  It's going to be a very busy summer!

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It depends on what you mean by valid. They don't count for NMSQT, but sure, you can calculate a selection index (reading, writing, and math scores, each out of 40, added together and doubled).

I meant he took the PSAT 8/9 so less questions. Very confused by all of this;) just wondered if that translated in any way.

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If you get desperate, I could always log in for you! I could be your Own Private VPN! :laugh:

Awww, thanks for the offer. We finally got them this afternoon. 😎

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We are in VA, and our scores weren't accessible this morning, either. I called the CollegeBoard and they got me access immediately. The scores weren't showing up because dd's info was linked to 2 accounts - the one for the school where she took the test, and her own CollegeBoard account. So you might be able to get scores with a phone call if there is a similar issue!

Thanks. I ended up clicking on the link to update his account, got hung up on the school question (like others), checked the box for school not listed and then everything was fine.

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I began to get excited about DD's scores when she received unsolicited mail from Vanderbilt last week.  PonyGirl didn't think much of it, until I pointed out what the typical student profile is.

 

It's wonderful that you're happy with the scores!  But, snail mail college spam is completely meaningless.

 

I meant he took the PSAT 8/9 so less questions. Very confused by all of this;) just wondered if that translated in any way.

 

In theory perhaps, but that seems kinda far removed.  The PSAT ceiling per section is 38, whereas the ceiling on the 8/9 is 36.

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The test content is the same. There are just different percentiles for 10th graders. PSAT/NMSQT is the name for the fall version, PSAT10 the spring version, but they are the same.

 

https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/psat-nmsqt-psat-10/taking-the-tests/compare-psat-nmsqt-psat-10

I know what the PSAT10 is. Northcoast thought that since her child took the PSAT as a 10th grader that meant that the score would be under the PSAT10 tab. I was just letting her know that the PSAT and the PSAT10 are separate tests.

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DS18 and I had a nice outing yesterday and got quite a bit of Christmas shopping done. :001_smile:

But writing is the real shocker:  He never missed more than four writing questions in any practice test this year (all College Board or Ivy Global tests, so all high-quality tests).  He took one test per week and the last time he missed four questions on writing was in the middle of July.  He only missed three questions once since that time.  He got a "score" of 37 out of 40 on Writing section of the SATs he took in October and November.  I cannot fathom him missing six.

I finally got a chance to sit down and look at DS18s Writing answers and I am now fully convinced that the four questions he missed in a row were entirely a result of a bubbling error.  His technique is to complete a pair of pages and then bubble all of the questions completed.  Somehow it appears that he transposed the first two with the latter two questions of the four.  In other words, I am now convinced that he actually got only two questions wrong on Writing, not six.

 

With that mistake corrected, he would have achieved a score of 1460 (versus 1430) and a selection index of 217 (versus 211).

 

I will call the College Board tomorrow tomorrow and ask them if they can take into consideration his paper test given we have not yet had access to it it.  It cannot hurt.

 

In any case, we will know the truth once we see the paper test.

 

Clearly this is one drawback to these one-and-done standardized tests.

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It's wonderful that you're happy with the scores!  But, snail mail college spam is completely meaningless.

 

 

In theory perhaps, but that seems kinda far removed.  The PSAT ceiling per section is 38, whereas the ceiling on the 8/9 is 36.

 

Pretty sure it's not completely meaningless -- a least not as an indication of how she did on the test -- as there is a huge difference in the colleges sent spam mail to DS after his PSAT (zero), the types of schools that sent DS mail after his first ACT and SAT scores (all but one were mid-tier schools, where he's in the top 25% -- I'm still confused about why Webb Institute sent him a 9x12 envelope with a letter and recruitment package this fall, as his scores -- while over 1400 -- don't seem to me to be Webb Institute level for a boy), and the schools DD is receiving from (much more selective schools that don't generally provide Merit Aid).  While they don't get scores unless I send them to the school, I'd hazard to guess that they are able to select test takers who score within a certain target range (this is normally how list rentals are done, you select based upon a certain criteria, and a certain number).  So, I looked it up and, I was correct (bolding mine):

 

 

Does getting mail from a college mean they are interested in me?

No. It means they’re interested in something about your scores or demographics. In the early stages of the admission process (sophomore and early junior years), colleges are just looking to initiate student interest within target groups. Admissions offices purchase contact information for students in particular groups who score between particular ranges on national standardized tests. College X might want the information for every student in the Western United States who scores between 50 and 70 on the reading section of the PSAT; University Y might ask for girls whose math scores exceed 30 on the ACT. In the end, a very small percentage of these students will turn into active prospects and even fewer will turn into real applicants. You’re being targeted because you are from a certain demographic, but not because of who you are. They simply couldn’t know details about your academic career at this point.

 

I realize that marketing mail to prospective students in no way means a child will be accepted, and that the range of students being sent to may be a bit wider than the student profile in order to get more applications -- so in that way, it's meaningless.  But, I was not wrong that her scores were high enough to attract the attention of schools like (and including) Vanderbilt (unless it was her swimming, and the coach requested her contact information and sent it to the marketing department, but that seems less likely at this point in her career).  FWIW, My son's scores in 10th grade were respectable, but showed he needed to work.  My daughter's scores are exceptional (280 points higher on the SAT comparison, and 20 points higher on the NMSQT scale, just missing the commended range as a 10th grader).

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While they don't get scores unless I send them to the school, I'd hazard to guess that they are able to select test takers who score within a certain target range (this is normally how list rentals are done, you select based upon a certain criteria, and a certain number).  So, I looked it up and, I was correct (bolding mine):

 

 

interesting. i never really thought much about it. my son too this year has been bombarded with solicitations, vanderbilt included too. i hadn't thought that it could be more student-specific based on scores at all. interesting thought.

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So... I began to get excited about DD's scores when she received unsolicited mail from Vanderbilt last week.  PonyGirl didn't think much of it, until I pointed out what the typical student profile is.  Her PSAT scores did not disappoint.  She's just in 10th, so this was the last go-around from practice.  Happily, she did equally well on the Verbal as she did on the math (which also surprised her).  She is not far off from NMSQ range.  Given the mental state she was in when starting the test, we both believe she could have done even better (she was sent to the wrong classroom, and had to wait about 40 minutes for a new testing room assignment, but when she arrived, they did not have a seat for her -- so she had to run and locate a desk and carry it back).  Given where she is swimming-wise, having a predicted score her junior year in the statistically perfect range puts her in a perfect position for a great school academically and a great place to swim.  Two service academies have already contacted her (swimming).  It's going to be a very busy summer!

 

FWIW my ds got unsolicited mail from Vanderbilt last week too. His PSAT scores were not as high as he had hoped. So I'm not sure how much the unsolicited mail really means.

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I'm sorry if this is repetitive, but I can't get into the scoring because I have neither a student ID nor an access code.

 

I called the school where he took it, but have yet to hear back, after 24 hours.

 

Any suggestions?

Edited by historymatters

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DD only marked the box for student search services for the PSAT (not for SAT or ACT), so the email & mail she receives comes only from that (and from a few very specific colleges she asked for information from). Email from the PSAT as a source started arriving on Nov 9th!

 

There are stories that juniors who have very high scores sometimes receive emails from TASP (Telluride Association Summer Program). Some kids who later go on to become National Merit Finalists do not receive the email, but from reading past threads, many top scorers do. (It is only open to kids the summer between their junior & senior years, I think.) So, I do believe that the College Board sells lists of the students in certain score bands and/or who fit certain demographics that are requested (or available based on how the CB sorts the data). 

 

However, like others, I have let DD know that just because a college sends you email/mail, it doesn't mean you'd get in. (Tulane being an example for my kid.) We needed to expand her net since she doesn't know what she wants to do or where she wants to go and she's certainly hearing from some places she's never heard of before (Colby College, for example).

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Did you already call the College Board directly? Does your kid have a CB account? If no account yet, did s/he list an email on the PSAT? If so, try to set up an account. If there is an account, are the scores just not showing up? Call the College Board.

Nevermind on the crossed out portions. I just went back and found your earlier posts.

Definitely just call the College Board.

 

I'm sorry if this is repetitive, but I can't get into the scoring because I have neither a student ID nor an access code.

I called the school where he took it, but have yet to hear back, after 24 hours.

Any suggestions?

 

Edited by RootAnn
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DD only marked the box for student search services for the PSAT (not for SAT or ACT), so the email & mail she receives comes only from that (and from a few very specific colleges she asked for information from). Email from the PSAT as a source started arriving on Nov 9th!

 

There are stories that juniors who have very high scores sometimes receive emails from TASP (Telluride Association Summer Program). Some kids who later go on to become National Merit Finalists do not receive the email, but from reading past threads, many top scorers do. (It is only open to kids the summer between their junior & senior years, I think.) So, I do believe that the College Board sells lists of the students in certain score bands and/or who fit certain demographics that are requested (or available based on how the CB sorts the data). 

 

However, like others, I have let DD know that just because a college sends you email/mail, it doesn't mean you'd get in. (Tulane being an example for my kid.) We needed to expand her net since she doesn't know what she wants to do or where she wants to go and she's certainly hearing from some places she's never heard of before (Colby College, for example).

 

I think our daughters are on the same list! I think your explanation is better than mine:  "Oh, look! You are being bombarded with emails from freaking expensive private schools that we could never freaking afford and who don't give merit aid!" (And I just got done looking up "Reed College."  Private? Yep. Expensive? Oh, yeah. Merit aid? Nope. Email deleted.)

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I will call the College Board tomorrow tomorrow and ask them if they can take into consideration his paper test given we have not yet had access to it it.  It cannot hurt.

I called the College Board and asked about having DS18's bubbling reviewed for four questions in the Writing section.  I was told that they offered this service for the SAT, but not for the PSAT.  I spoke with first-level support and their manager and got the same response from both of them.  I explained that the score likely did not reflect the student's skills in the Writing section and asked if they could review the workbook BEFORE I have any access to it.

 

The manager agreed to escalate the issue to a higher level and that they would look into it an give me a call.

 

It doesn't sound promising, but I will keep pursuing this for a while.

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I'm sorry if this is repetitive, but I can't get into the scoring because I have neither a student ID nor an access code.

 

Any suggestions?

Call CollegeBoard. They just need name, birthdate, residential address, test site name and test site address. The waiting time can be as short as a few minutes or as long as 20mins before you get a customer service rep. We called many times.

 

“Phone and Email

 

Phone: 866-433-7728

 

Phone support is available 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday, from September to early Juneâ€

 

ETA:

The number above is the PSAT hotline which is different from the SAT hotline. Same verification questions regardless of what scores we were asking for. https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/contact-us

Edited by Arcadia
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However, like others, I have let DD know that just because a college sends you email/mail, it doesn't mean you'd get in. (Tulane being an example for my kid.) We needed to expand her net since she doesn't know what she wants to do or where she wants to go and she's certainly hearing from some places she's never heard of before (Colby College, for example).

My kids get spam mails from colleges because of Talent Search programs. Most do say who was the referral so we knew why our kids get a particular spam. Notre Dame was one of the colleges that mass mail many people we know.

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Pretty sure it's not completely meaningless -- a least not as an indication of how she did on the test -- as there is a huge difference in the colleges sent spam mail to DS after his PSAT (zero)

 

With zero spam from the psat, my guess would be that your ds did not check the box.

 

I realize that marketing mail to prospective students in no way means a child will be accepted, and that the range of students being sent to may be a bit wider than the student profile in order to get more applications -- so in that way, it's meaningless. 

 

The range must be really big.  My dd received spam from Vandy too, but not for anything remotely approaching competitive scores.  Vandy has a reputation for liking very high scores.

 

However, I do like that Vandy is one of the few schools that separated out Old and New scores when they reported their admissions data from this past season, first season with the New test.  That helps avoid accuracy concerns over the botched concordance.

 

ETA, and if I had a nickel for every piece of spam from U Chicago...

Edited by wapiti
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Thanks everyone. I will call CB now.

 

Well, I called and they couldn't find him. They didn't want the school's name and address, they didn't ask for our address. The lady put in a request for an investigation.

 

I heard back from the school and their code didn't work. She's going to research.

 

After waiting so long, this is frustrating.

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