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Can we have a "what does your 3rd grader do" thread? :)


PeterPan
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My ds has ASD level 1 and is gifted with learning disabilities, language disabilities, so that's my context. What does your 3rd grader DO? How does he busy himself, what are his pursuits and recreation? How many hours a day does your 3rd grader do with you that are NOT read alouds or him reading? What narrative language skills or composition skills does he have? 

 

Ds is bored and flying through things. Granted, we're finishing a level of materials and needing to start the next. But it's more than he had a growth spurt and is ready for MORE, and I'm trying to define what that MORE is. He usually functions about 2 years behind, btw. So he's a fall b-day 3rd grader, age 9, but he functions more like a 2nd grader. So actually anything from 2nd grade would be just as useful. We've just finished going through our nth round of 1st grade materials, and I'm pretty satisfied that I could find any publisher of 1st grade stuff and he could do the work, meaning he's now going into 2nd functionally. But he listens to college lectures and blows through 4th grade video science. He's just all over the place. I'm not sure his narrative skills are yet solidly 1st grade though. That's a work in progress. We're working on it. 

 

Does your 3rd grader do any independent work? Did they do any in 2nd? Do you use lists and checklists with them?

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I've a 3rd grader. We afterschool, not homeschool. We recently bought her a Chromebook (b/c our district uses them). I got it to complement school stuff but also to expand her tech skills. She's currently fiddling around with Google Docs and Google Slides. I'll get her online for typing instruction soon too.

 

Perhaps you can have your child mess around with a bit of tech. Give informal assignments on the computer that foster these skills but also reinforce academic ones. For example, slides to sum up new learning. Graphics organizers to do same. Homemade video clips to present research, etc. This is the new passion around here at least.

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I have a 2nd grade 7yo boy.  This year he is doing these daily, 3-4 days a week:

 

60m - math (Right Start D and Life of Fred)

20m - violin

20m - logic activities (Thinkfun games, Critical Thinking Company books)

60m - language arts (ELTL 3).  This included grammar, copywork, oral narration, poetry time, read aloud, and a reader.  He does dictation with Dictation Day By Day.

20m - foreign language.  He alternates 3, doing two a day: ASL, French, and Spanish. Once a week he has an outside class for an hour.

60m - history (SoTW 2).  Our week is spread out to do: activity/reading, map/questions/narration, activity/reading, narration/art.  Often a read aloud is thrown in, too.

40m - science (BFSU).  All hands on, Socratic method. Readers available.

60m - p.e.  An actual time set aside to be active with an organized activity.

20m - Latin (GSWL)

 

 

As far as what his narration looks like, he still does mostly oral with beginning written narrations in language arts.  He is very wordy, so I started cutting his history narrations down to 3-4 sentences.  He takes notes and then forms 3 or 4 complete thoughts in his head that I write down.  For language arts, this is an example:

 

The Sun And The Wind

One day the Sun was out and the Wind was out too and came over and said, "I'm much stronger then you. I could beat you in a contest." And the Sun said, "hmm a contst that sound's good." And then a man came out and the Sun said, "First one to take of the man's coat wins."

The Wind said, "Ha! That's easy! I could easily beat you!"

And the Sun said, "we'll see."

And so the contest began the Wind tried an tried but he couldent do it. And so the Sun tried and won the contest.

 

---------------

All punctuation, spelling, and grammar are his. :lol:  You can see he got tired of writing after setting it up and hurried to finish.

 

 

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Independently she did XtraMath and some assigned reading. We just did copywork in 2nd, not much original writing. Oral narrations she did well with, but putting it down on paper was harder. Occasionally I'd write a sentence from her oral narration for her to copy, but she didn't like it much and I didn't push it. She just tagged along in history with the older kids. For science we did lots of hands on stuff and Magic School Bus videos (obviously your DS would be beyond those). In her spare time she played outside on the trampoline and with Barbies and Legos. Impressive, I know ;)

 

Sent from my Z988 using Tapatalk

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I've a 3rd grader. We afterschool, not homeschool. We recently bought her a Chromebook (b/c our district uses them). I got it to complement school stuff but also to expand her tech skills. She's currently fiddling around with Google Docs and Google Slides. I'll get her online for typing instruction soon too.

 

Perhaps you can have your child mess around with a bit of tech. Give informal assignments on the computer that foster these skills but also reinforce academic ones. For example, slides to sum up new learning. Graphics organizers to do same. Homemade video clips to present research, etc. This is the new passion around here at least.

 

Ooo, I really like that! I had gotten some stuff to explore that (ebooks with projects) and got distracted because we were working so much on behavior! Your projects sound terrific, very empowering, and you're right it's the kind of stuff they LOVE to do with bright kids, especially kids with disabilities, because it opens up communication outlets. 

 

Good suggestion! :)

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I'm lighter in the earlier years and we start formal work later than a lot of people here.  (I will say, I'm pretty pleased with how it's worked with my oldest, now that we are ramping up for middle school - there's only a few things I mean to tweak and start a bit earlier with the others - mostly grammar (start 3rd) and Latin (start beginning of 5th).)

 

Work we do together: (takes about 1.0-1.5 hours)

Math: SM 2B textbook (4x/wk)

Grammar: FLL 3 (2x/wk)

Composition: WWE 1 at double pace (do two days' worth each day, 4x/wk); after the new year, we'll be doing WWE 2 at double pace

REWARDS: one lesson a week, spread over two days (2x/wk)

Spelling: 20 words from phonics book, plus a lesson from Dictation Day-by-Day (4x/wk)

 

Work she does independently: (takes 2-3 hours)

Math: SM 2B workbook, SM IP 2A (4x/wk)

Composition: the copywork from our work together (4x/wk)

Cursive: four lines of copywork (4x/wk)

Spelling: marking her spelling words with the Spelling-You-See marking system (4x/wk)

Independent Reading: her choice from lit, history, or science (4x/wk)

Piano: 15-20 min practice (6x/wk - she practices on the weekends, too)

 

So far, third grade in our homeschool tends to be the first "ramping up" year, in terms of having more than reading/math/handwriting/read-alouds.  We tend to spend about equal time on math (tb/wb and IP) as we do on LA (reading, handwriting, spelling, composition, grammar) - about 1.0-1.5 hours on each - plus read-alouds/independent reading. 

 

With my oldest, I pretty much did all elementary literature/history/science through read-alouds (K-2) and independent reading (3-5) - she was a voracious reader and would read most anything, and I've been extremely pleased with the results.  We'll see how it goes with my middle - she doesn't read as widely as my oldest, and is more resistant to reading mom-picks.  She prefers to re-read books we read aloud or that she listened to on audiobooks (plus she reads age-level twaddle) - which mostly means she reads and re-reads the Narnia books, the Harry Potter books, and the Lord of the Rings trilogy (right now she's proudly on her second re-read of LotR).  Which I'm mostly good with right now - the quality and difficulty are just great for her age - but if I'm going to "unschool" the content subjects, we're going to need to move past that, too.  Still, she's only been fluently reading for less than a year - I'm still working on advanced phonics skills with her.  And it might help if I read the first chapter or two of something new aloud - get her interested in it.

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I have a 2nd grade 7yo boy.  This year he is doing these daily, 3-4 days a week:

 

60m - math (Right Start D and Life of Fred)

20m - violin

20m - logic activities (Thinkfun games, Critical Thinking Company books)

60m - language arts (ELTL 3).  This included grammar, copywork, oral narration, poetry time, read aloud, and a reader.  He does dictation with Dictation Day By Day.

20m - foreign language.  He alternates 3, doing two a day: ASL, French, and Spanish. Once a week he has an outside class for an hour.

60m - history (SoTW 2).  Our week is spread out to do: activity/reading, map/questions/narration, activity/reading, narration/art.  Often a read aloud is thrown in, too.

40m - science (BFSU).  All hands on, Socratic method. Readers available.

60m - p.e.  An actual time set aside to be active with an organized activity.

20m - Latin (GSWL)

 

 

As far as what his narration looks like, he still does mostly oral with beginning written narrations in language arts.  He is very wordy, so I started cutting his history narrations down to 3-4 sentences.  He takes notes and then forms 3 or 4 complete thoughts in his head that I write down.  For language arts, this is an example:

 

The Sun And The Wind

One day the Sun was out and the Wind was out too and came over and said, "I'm much stronger then you. I could beat you in a contest." And the Sun said, "hmm a contst that sound's good." And then a man came out and the Sun said, "First one to take of the man's coat wins."

The Wind said, "Ha! That's easy! I could easily beat you!"

And the Sun said, "we'll see."

And so the contest began the Wind tried an tried but he couldent do it. And so the Sun tried and won the contest.

 

---------------

All punctuation, spelling, and grammar are his. :lol:  You can see he got tired of writing after setting it up and hurried to finish.

 

Thank you for sharing this! I really appreciate you typing out that narration, because it makes me feel a lot better! My dd had these PROLIFIC narrations at that age, so it totally, totally skewed my sense of what it should look like. And for ds, with the male thing plus the ASD and language issues, he's just really different. I would say he's on the formative end of that, just below that. Like we can read the short passage (4 sentences), identify keywords, and have him give 1-2 sentences. So it sounds like we're on track, even if we're behind, and that we're in the flow of what the male species looks like for it. :D

 

What logic and Critical Thinking workbooks are you using? I feel like I ought to know, and I don't, lol.

 

Hmm, foreign language. I have Muzzy spanish sitting here. We tried a memorization-based approach, and it was slow-going. Muzzy is cute but requires a lot of inferencing. That sort of makes it a good activity in and of itself. I'll have to think about it some more.

 

Wow, your amounts are high. That's the thing with us, that right now we're blowing through a lot of stuff and going so FAST. Well maybe it will slow down with the next level of materials. You're right I'd like the quantity, the time together per day with that kind of structure, to be higher. Maybe not 4 hours like you, lol, but 3 would be really nice I think. It's probably partly because I end up scribing for him. We're doing a lot orally, so things just go faster, sigh. 

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Independently she did XtraMath and some assigned reading. We just did copywork in 2nd, not much original writing. Oral narrations she did well with, but putting it down on paper was harder. Occasionally I'd write a sentence from her oral narration for her to copy, but she didn't like it much and I didn't push it. She just tagged along in history with the older kids. For science we did lots of hands on stuff and Magic School Bus videos (obviously your DS would be beyond those). In her spare time she played outside on the trampoline and with Barbies and Legos. Impressive, I know ;)

 

Sent from my Z988 using Tapatalk

 

Well that's what's so fascinating! Sounds like he's really in that realm of typical, the way he's functioning. And yes, we could do more hands-on. I think that would be a good area to step up our game. We've done more in the past and have the stuff. I kinda dropped from the list. Good, good point.

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I'm lighter in the earlier years and we start formal work later than a lot of people here.  (I will say, I'm pretty pleased with how it's worked with my oldest, now that we are ramping up for middle school - there's only a few things I mean to tweak and start a bit earlier with the others - mostly grammar (start 3rd) and Latin (start beginning of 5th).)

 

Work we do together: (takes about 1.0-1.5 hours)

Math: SM 2B textbook (4x/wk)

Grammar: FLL 3 (2x/wk)

Composition: WWE 1 at double pace (do two days' worth each day, 4x/wk); after the new year, we'll be doing WWE 2 at double pace

REWARDS: one lesson a week, spread over two days (2x/wk)

Spelling: 20 words from phonics book, plus a lesson from Dictation Day-by-Day (4x/wk)

 

Work she does independently: (takes 2-3 hours)

Math: SM 2B workbook, SM IP 2A (4x/wk)

Composition: the copywork from our work together (4x/wk)

Cursive: four lines of copywork (4x/wk)

Spelling: marking her spelling words with the Spelling-You-See marking system (4x/wk)

Independent Reading: her choice from lit, history, or science (4x/wk)

Piano: 15-20 min practice (6x/wk - she practices on the weekends, too)

 

So far, third grade in our homeschool tends to be the first "ramping up" year, in terms of having more than reading/math/handwriting/read-alouds.  We tend to spend about equal time on math (tb/wb and IP) as we do on LA (reading, handwriting, spelling, composition, grammar) - about 1.0-1.5 hours on each - plus read-alouds/independent reading. 

 

With my oldest, I pretty much did all elementary literature/history/science through read-alouds (K-2) and independent reading (3-5) - she was a voracious reader and would read most anything, and I've been extremely pleased with the results.  We'll see how it goes with my middle - she doesn't read as widely as my oldest, and is more resistant to reading mom-picks.  She prefers to re-read books we read aloud or that she listened to on audiobooks (plus she reads age-level twaddle) - which mostly means she reads and re-reads the Narnia books, the Harry Potter books, and the Lord of the Rings trilogy (right now she's proudly on her second re-read of LotR).  Which I'm mostly good with right now - the quality and difficulty are just great for her age - but if I'm going to "unschool" the content subjects, we're going to need to move past that, too.  Still, she's only been fluently reading for less than a year - I'm still working on advanced phonics skills with her.  And it might help if I read the first chapter or two of something new aloud - get her interested in it.

 

Now see this is really interesting, because your balance is sort of like ours, with a lot of time into FOUNDATION. And that's interesting that you're seeing it step up at 3rd. So I'm not crazy! 

 

I have been working him through a series of leveled readers that he is now bored with. My next step is to use search engines to see if I can find other books at the library (or that I own, hmm) that follow those levels. It would eat up some time. Then I could plan in 30 minutes of reading a day or something, hmm.

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2nd grade 2e kid here.

 

For school:

- 30 minutes Math - Beast Academy with substantial breaks between chapters for brain breaks. She’s independent probably 75% of the time, but I have to be nearby in order to redirect attention or handle meltdowns

- 30 minutes homemade Cultural Geography - Literature-based, done completely together

- 30 minutes English - what we do changes through the year, occasionally independent, usually with me

- 30 minutes foreign language - completely with her dad

- 60 minutes Science - currently an online class, with assignments from them - I help with technology (how many times do I need to teach her to navigate links!?!), she does the reading independently, she types her paragraph-long assignments at the speed of a snail and I proofread before she posts

 

Independent time:

- lots of reading

- plays with her 3d pen

- plays with clay/Sculpey

- uses all the other art supplies

- iPad - loaded down with edutainment

- rarely: plays with actual toys. I wonder why we have toys sometimes.

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Sorry.,,I gave a nt answer.

 

Is he using speech to text, or typing at all?

 

We were trying to get typing off the ground. I want to do Dvorak (alternate keyboard layout) with him because he was pecking QWERTY and because we have reason to think QWERTY won't go well anyway. But with his rigidity, he can't tolerate they keyboard not following the rules or being different. So what I was TRYING to do was tape the keyboard with colored washi tape, saying it was to code for his fingers, which was also true! So then he ripped the tape off in a fit one day, sigh. An hour's work, down the drain. Story of my life, lol. So I don't know if I'll tape again or what. Probably will try. Then do dictation using lists I made that work for just the home row of Dvorak. 

 

So you know how that is, when you sorta let your grand intentions make the project so hard it doesn't happen, lol.

 

TTS, well we started, were doing lists, but when we wanted narratives it became obvious the language issues were in the way. We backed way up and went to sequencing. We've done multiple sequencing workbooks now and have more to go. Like here are 5 pictures, put them in order, say what's happening, give some dialogue, etc. It's a real slow, tedious dance, building the skills. We kick it up, so we'll change tense (present to past), narrator, add dialogue, play around with different starting points, your normal progymnasta kind of skills for the age. He's good with all that.

 

So his language skills have to come up to do more with the tech. We do things like playing with toys and adding dialogue or creating stories that we scribe. I have some more sequencing sets that will step it up. I almost hired someone to do some more advanced narrative building using tech like the Lego Storycreator stuff, but I just gave up. It was too much hassle right now to deal with another person, even a useful person. 

 

He's able to do modest web surfing, like flipping forward and backward in pages or finding an app in iTunes.

 

Yeah, so mainly we conclude his language was holding him back so much. We're putting over $10k of his scholarship into speech therapy this year AND doing stuff at home. Language is where it's at, because all your school work hinges on language.

 

It's sad, but in a way we have to prioritize disability and behavior over abilities and gifts. Like it's more important that he's calm than whether he's doing the most advanced things. He's saying he'd like to try Awana, which is HUGE for him. It will be very hard. Actually, that will add time to our day! Score. And we're getting the hymns ahead of church so I can preteach them. He wasn't connecting with the language, so he was having behaviors. That takes time. That was just new for us last week, but it was a huge, huge success. 

 

Well I think this is coming together in my mind. If I got us going with some more hands-on (which we have but weren't doing), get the verses and hymns going, and typing, that would be a lot for him. That would be shazam, tons. And maybe the Muzzy. I still have it. That would be in the hard level, don't know. But we could try, just to see. Sometimes once he figures out what he's supposed to be looking for he's kinda brilliant.

 

The kindle fire remote can understand him now. That was our other glitch with tts, that it didn't understand him reliably, sigh. We've been banging it out with our new speech therapist. It took them 6 months to pair, but now he's doing great with her. He's more intelligible and he's finally nailing the Ls and Rs better. He had dropped intelligibility and was only at around 75-80% before we resumed. It wasn't enough for tech to understand him, so I was having to scribe or say it into the device for him, which was clumsy at best.

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Fwiw my current 2nd grader is not the best narrator, her older brother was fantastic at oral narrations (he just had trouble writing things down). She does much better reading herself and then answering questions. I have to repeat stories a million times and often end up just letting her read, her audio skills are not great whereas that was one of ds's strong skills, he loved to listening to stories. 

 

This is one- she gave me orally- she is doing WWE2

 

The piper offered to get rid of the rats with his pipe the rats followed the piper and fell into the river. 

 

From the Pied Piper, even though we do a lot of poetry and she loves it she had more difficulty narrating from this poem, I had to steer her towards the main points and expain some of the language.

 

Mrs. Frisby woke up and went downstairs and outside to get food for sick son Timmy.

From Mrs. Frisby- She had an easier time with this one.

 

 

Free-time- 

Reading and re-reading. Crafts. Pretend play with sisters. Putting on make-up. Watching shows on YouTube or Netflix. Exploring outside. Playing with pets. Creating various things and making HUGE messes!

Edited by soror
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‎hanover.k12.va.us/rpes/reading/Leveled%20Book%20List%20_summer_.pdf

 

https://www.mcplibrary.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Level_I.pdf

 

Just a couple of links I'm saving here. These are regular books keyed to Fountas & Pinnell levels. F&P is not phonics but language, amount of picture support, how long the sentences are, etc. My ds can technically read much higher, like he'll read the newspaper if the article interests him, but he doesn't choose to read at all. The F&P readers set him at ease, with their very gradual increase in difficulty, and have helped make him more comfortable. 

 

So this kind of exciting actually, because it's what we were working toward, getting him to where he'd be comfortable enough with language to choose to read, choose to do it for breaks, etc.

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Fwiw my current 2nd grader is not the best narrator, her older brother was fantastic at oral narrations (he just had trouble writing things down). She does much better reading herself and then answering questions. I have to repeat stories a million times and often end up just letting her read, her audio skills are not great whereas that was one of ds's strong skills, he loved to listening to stories. 

 

This is one- she gave me orally- she is doing WWE2

 

The piper offered to get rid of the rats with his pipe the rats followed the piper and fell into the river. 

 

From the Pied Piper, even though we do a lot of poetry and she loves it she had more difficulty narrating from this poem, I had to steer her towards the main points and expain some of the language.

 

Mrs. Frisby woke up and went downstairs and outside to get food for sick son Timmy.

From Mrs. Frisby- She had an easier time with this one.

 

 

Free-time- 

Reading and re-reading. Crafts. Pretend play with sisters. Putting on make-up. Watching shows on YouTube or Netflix. Exploring outside. Playing with pets. Creating various things and making HUGE messes!

 

Soror, that's really interesting that you're noticing a difference between when she reads the source vs. you reading the source. For the summarizing worksheets we use now, we tend to read silently or popcorn read. You're right I don't have anything that I just read him aloud. That would probably be hard for him to process on the fly. He seems really to do better with visual supports. We're using picture supports with the sequencing work, that kind of thing. They fade as you go through the levels, but yeah lots of visual supports. That's a really, really good point. And then they have us underline or circle the key words to use them to write the summary. It seems like a good strategy with him to have that visual support. So you're saying be cautious if we ever tried WWE, hmm.

 

What would happen if she tried to narrate from a simple book she read, like a book report? 

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My ds has ASD level 1 and is gifted with learning disabilities, language disabilities, so that's my context. What does your 3rd grader DO? How does he busy himself, what are his pursuits and recreation? How many hours a day does your 3rd grader do with you that are NOT read alouds or him reading? What narrative language skills or composition skills does he have? 

 

Does your 3rd grader do any independent work? Did they do any in 2nd? Do you use lists and checklists with them?

 

My last year's 3rd grader busied himself recreationally with Lego, going outside, skating in winter, swimming and basketball in summer, going with Dad on the farm as much as possible, and some playing and giggling with his sister. He also read books on his own quite a bit. Do you mean how many hours of school he did with me? That would be about an hour a day, maybe one and a half. As far as narrative and composition skills, in 3rd grade he was still using the bigger-lined paper with the dotted lines in the middle, could write down a decent sentence from dictation about 12-15 words long, and narrated everything orally to me. His narrations still had a lot of sentences starting with "and" and a lot of "and then" in them. He almost never remembered to capitalize proper nouns while writing. Here are a few examples of his narrations:

 

"James and Lewis were walking home from school and Lewis was thinking about a pellet gun. He wanted one a lot. Somebody in school had one and that gave him the idea that he wanted one."

 

"Some Chinese farmers were digging a well for water and they came to a tunnel and in it were a lot of statues of people. They kept digging with some more people to help them and they found a statue of a carriage and a horse. They found a replica of the empire with mercury flowing for the rivers."

 

"Carthage and Rome were both trying to expand so they started fighting. While they were fighting, the Romans were expanding east into Greek land. They fought three wars and Carthage was crushed."

 

He didn't do that much independent work in 2nd or 3rd. I would say probably none in 2nd. In 3rd, he began doing his math mostly independently and maybe some of his spelling. I sort of used checklists with him. I have my planner for the day sitting on the school table. On it, by his name, are all his assignments for the day, so he used that list to know what to do that day, but he didn't check anything off.

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Jackie, what is a 3d pen?

 

Yes, I definitely think this independent reading is what I've got to get going. I can do that with no hassle, where he is now. I couldn't require it before, but we've gotten him there.

These: https://www.amazon.com/s/gp/search/ref=sr_nr_p_85_0?fst=p90x%3A1%2Cas%3Aoff&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3A3d+pen%2Cp_72%3A2661618011%2Cp_85%3A2470955011&keywords=3d+pen&ie=UTF8&qid=1510165541&rnid=2470954011

 

They basically melt plastic thread at a low temp so people can create with it. For DD, it’s basically a tech-y art tool. I love it because it’s a sneaky way to work on fine motor skills and stretches her patience/focus a bit because you have to go slowly if you want anything to work.

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My current third grader is very bright, but very distracted and does not enjoy "school".  She is plugging along though, and I think she will take off later as some of my others have.  We have a lot going on, so I will try to give you a general idea of what she is doing and hope it doesn't completely confuse you.

 

Sunday: church, soccer game (fall and spring), often goes to church friend's house

Monday: 8:00 CNN news, Bible, soccer with Dad or run down the street

9:00 ish  Meet with Mom--phonics, read to mom, math lesson

9:30 ish 20 minutes silent reading, Xtra math

10 ish Meet again with Mom--Apples and Pears spelling, IEW writing (we were doing grammar, but have paused)

10:30 ish snack and sometimes recess

11  Missionary Biography, read aloud (by Mom) history or science, memory work, nature studies, art (depends on the day, what we need to focus on)

11:45 piano practice; guitar practice

12 lunch

1:00 quiet time--listen to books on tape, do math workbook, handwriting, any writing she has

2:00 QT finished complete independent work

3:00-5:00 guitar/music program at local church

 

5:20 dinner

After dinner she does chores, I read aloud a chapter book, she sometimes plays games with her dad or brother, she listens to books on tape and reads for 30 minutes. Sometimes she has independent work to finish.

9--bed time

 

Tuesday:  We go to another state for a high school program for her sister.  We school at a beautiful library.  We cover the same subjects as above, but she mostly finished by 12 (no instruments or books on tape time this day) In the afternoon she hangs out with younger siblings at the program and then we go home.

4:15-5:15 Screen time

then see above

 

Weds:See Monday except no music program

Thurs:  Monday schedule until 11:30 when she has piano lessons

12:30  2 families come over for "history group"  She does hands-on science and social studies activities (presently we are covering US geography) and then has a long play with her good friends

5:15-6:15 screen time and then reg. evening schedule

 

Friday:  non-coop  Monday schedule (but we try to go to an hour of park day in the afternoon)

Co-op  8-12:15  She does board games, card making and fencing

12:15-1:30 lunch with co-op folks

home and 3-5 music. 

5:15-6:15 screen time. Reg. evening sched

 

Saturday: Soccer

Free play, catch up, drive siblings around

 

She also has chores and I try to send her out as much as possible.

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My last year's 3rd grader busied himself recreationally with Lego, going outside, skating in winter, swimming and basketball in summer, going with Dad on the farm as much as possible, and some playing and giggling with his sister. He also read books on his own quite a bit. Do you mean how many hours of school he did with me? That would be about an hour a day, maybe one and a half. As far as narrative and composition skills, in 3rd grade he was still using the bigger-lined paper with the dotted lines in the middle, could write down a decent sentence from dictation about 12-15 words long, and narrated everything orally to me. His narrations still had a lot of sentences starting with "and" and a lot of "and then" in them. He almost never remembered to capitalize proper nouns while writing. Here are a few examples of his narrations:

 

"James and Lewis were walking home from school and Lewis was thinking about a pellet gun. He wanted one a lot. Somebody in school had one and that gave him the idea that he wanted one."

 

"Some Chinese farmers were digging a well for water and they came to a tunnel and in it were a lot of statues of people. They kept digging with some more people to help them and they found a statue of a carriage and a horse. They found a replica of the empire with mercury flowing for the rivers."

 

"Carthage and Rome were both trying to expand so they started fighting. While they were fighting, the Romans were expanding east into Greek land. They fought three wars and Carthage was crushed."

 

He didn't do that much independent work in 2nd or 3rd. I would say probably none in 2nd. In 3rd, he began doing his math mostly independently and maybe some of his spelling. I sort of used checklists with him. I have my planner for the day sitting on the school table. On it, by his name, are all his assignments for the day, so he used that list to know what to do that day, but he didn't check anything off.

 

Wow, you're making me feel better! My ds is very similar for amounts of time spent on things, how he busies himself, etc. I was afraid I wasn't doing enough, but you're right that it might just be that we've found a good place for us and just a *little* more would be good, not double or triple more, lol. And you're right, it hadn't occurred to me that he might have a jump in independence in 4th, hmm. I've heard that, but I hadn't thought of it. 

 

Well thank you for explaining all that! 

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These: https://www.amazon.com/s/gp/search/ref=sr_nr_p_85_0?fst=p90x%3A1%2Cas%3Aoff&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3A3d+pen%2Cp_72%3A2661618011%2Cp_85%3A2470955011&keywords=3d+pen&ie=UTF8&qid=1510165541&rnid=2470954011

 

They basically melt plastic thread at a low temp so people can create with it. For DD, it’s basically a tech-y art tool. I love it because it’s a sneaky way to work on fine motor skills and stretches her patience/focus a bit because you have to go slowly if you want anything to work.

 

Oooo, that would be a good Christmas present!!  :D

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My current 3rd grader is a precocious (across the board) little guy with excellent fine motor skills and an independent streak. He looks very different from my previous two 3rd grade boys.

 

He is doing Writing and Rhetoric Fable and types up his stories. He can write a narration on his own (I don't expect that of a 3rd grader). I give him assignments and he goes off and does them. He's really a dream to homeschool. :lol: When he's not doing school, he plays with Legos or Smart Links (Wendy's kids meal toy that I've actually kept!), plays hockey (he's a goalie), or he has his nose in his Kindle Paperwhite. He loves to read and was an early reader.

 

Now my ASD kid in 3rd grade could not write a coherent sentence. He could give an oral narration fairly well. He's been able to do that since K, surprisingly. He used to give an oral narration of his Bible class story at speech therapy each week. :) But writing it down... In 5th grade we have finally worked up to a basic paragraph, and there is a lot of whining and complaining. He complains about all things school. He does not enjoy school. He does like his AoPS math (Prealgebra), though I have to do much of the writing, and I have to read it to him, as he would not be able to learn the information by reading that yet. He was so bored to tears with 6th grade math programs though, so I bumped him up. For fun, he does Legos and Smart Links and occasionally reads, but not as much as his brothers. He is only reading at grade level, so it's still a bit of work. We're slogging through as best we can.

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Peter is 8.5, in 3rd grade, struggles with ASD, ADD and anxiety, but is academically very accelerated.

 

He really struggles with sleep, so he wakes up around 5am and reads independently in his room until breakfast at 7.  Hypothetically this is "free" reading time, but when we go to the library he is too lazy/overwhelmed/distracted to pick books, so he ends up reading whatever I pick...which is skewed heavily toward quality literature and non-fiction.

 

During breakfast all the kids listen to a novel read aloud and some poetry and then watch CNN10 and a Spanish video.  After breakfast Peter does his independent work:

Piano (Hoffman Academy) - 15 minutes

Xtramath - 5 minutes

Duolingo - 10 minutes

Handwriting - 10 minutes

Assigned Reading and written narration - 15 minutes

 

He writes one narration sentence after each chapter he reads.  He asks for and I provide correct spellings for several words per narration.  These were some of his recent narrations:

Ben and Me:  "The mouse's name is Amos and he has 25 brothers and sisters named alphabetically."

Freckle Juice:  "Andrew used a blue magic marker to make "freckles"!"

The Indian in the Cupboard:  "Omri and Patrick has to go to the headmaster, and Patrick revealed the indian and the cowboy."

 

By this point I have taken care of the two younger children, and I am ready to focus on more intensive subjects with the two olders.  For Peter, this looks like:

 

Science or History (with me and the 1st grader) - 15 minutes

Hands on Equations - 15 minutes

Rosetta Stone - 15 minutes

 

and then either these subjects (2 days a week):

Writing (WWE) - 10-15 minutes

Grammar (MCT) - 10 minutes

Python - 15 minutes...and he will keep playing with it as long as he has time

 

or these subjects (2 days a week):

Memorization (Anki) - 15 minutes

Spelling (AAS) - 10-15 minutes

Typing - 10 minutes

 

After that we go to an extracurricular for about an hour: speech therapy, gym, swimming, Spanish, art

 

And then, after lunch:

Math (Math Mammoth) - 20 minutes

Practice Spanish vocab from class - 10 minutes

 

This seems to put him at just over 3 hours of "school" each day, plus his extracurriculars, plus several hours of free reading.

 

He also has chores he is responsible for each week: putting away his clean clothes, cleaning one of the bathrooms, changing and washing his and his sister's sheets, vacuuming the office and dining room, collecting and washing a load of towels, cleaning the microwave, and collecting and emptying all the small garbage cans before garbage day.  This is one chore per day (each of which I expect to take 15-20 minutes), but he is allowed to decide what order he does most of them and if he wants to do extras the first few days so he can slack off at the end of the week.

 

For fun, he reads a lot, plays with legos for a couple hours, draws comics, plays on the Wii, watches documentaries and American Ninja Warrior, plays with Snap Circuits, and plays Prodigy, Angry Birds and superhero games whenever he is allowed computer time.

 

Wendy

 

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DS1 was grade three last year, and DS2 is grade 3 this year.  They each have different academic strengths.  Nothing is done truly independently.  They are moving away from the mother-at-elbow stage into the mother-in-the-same-room stage though.   Academic seat work takes about 2 hours if they attend to their tasks.  Longer if they horse around.

 

DS1 is gets math easily and is very good at problem solving.  Has a ridiculously sharp memory.  Reads well above grade level.  Struggles mightily with handwriting and narration.  This is what he did:

 

LA:

WWE3 - The dictations were easy for him (he memorizes and spells very well).  The narrations were hard.  He still has a hard time pulling the key features from a text and turning them into a narration.  He prefers to repeat the text verbatim.  So we spend more time on this.

SWC - too easy, but presents/re-inforces spelling rules in a systematic way, so we plug through it.

FLL3 - just right

HWOT grade 3 cursive book.  Handwriting is still a challenge area for this kid.  HWOT is perfect for him

Reading - self-serve whatevery he wants from the home collection and library.  He is a self motivated reader and like to talk about what he reads.  No formal program necessary

 

Three math programs, taking the best from each, only one per day, usually done in block of severa weeks to months for each:

MUS gamma - for computation/multiplication

JUMP 3.1 and 3.2 - for everything else math but computation (geometry, patterns, probabitlity and data mangement.  We skip the "numbersense" sections as MUS does a much better job)

Ray's new intellectual arithmetic for re-inforcement, some exposure to fractions,  and word problems.

 

"choice" subjects - he gets to choose one per day, whichever he likes:

Hey Andrew, teach me some greek level 2.  he got really into this.

GSWL - didn't get very far with this, but pulls it out occasionally

Builiding thinking Skills level 1 - really liked this

 

History and Science:  Very relaxed, non-academic approach:

SOTW audiobook in the car and self-serve whenever.  Listened through all 4 levels

Mystery Science self-serve whenever, loved it.

brains-on podcast self-serve whenever, listened to every single episode ever made.

 

This kid got heavily into LEGO Mindstorms and Scratch.  Spent almost all his free time either building and programming robots or making Scratch programs (games, movies).  Or playing with a bin of random loose parts building stuff.

 

 

 

DS2: Loves stories and imaginative play.  Narrates like boss.  Lovely handwriting.  Struggles with spelling.  Not yet a fluent reader.  Math on-level, but not intuitive.

 

WWE2 - a year behind because needs a lot of hand-holding with the dictations.  Narrates very well.

SWB - this is hard, hard, hard for him.  We go slowly and do a lot of reinforcement.

OPGTR - reviewing the whole book.

HWOT grade 4 cursive.

FLL 3  - just right

 

MUS gamma, Jump 3.1 and 3.1, this will be enough.  Will not need to enrich with Ray's.

 

History and Science same as above.

 

Both kids are doing french together this year with L'art de Lire. 

 

No "choice".  The above is enough for him.

 

Spare time:  plays Mindstorms and Scratch alongside big bro, but more as a tag along.  Loves audiobooks and graphic novels, and has a big selection to choose from at home.  Imaginative play with stuffies, playmobile, lego etc.

 

 

They both have a lot of outdoor playtime.  Very limited electronics:  they self-serve Scratch on an old laptop, self-serve audiobooks on an old, disabled iPhone that does nothing else.  Mystery Science is done with parent assistance in getting logged on.  That's it.  They keep themselves entertained without any help from me.

 

 

 

 

 

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Wow, you're making me feel better! My ds is very similar for amounts of time spent on things, how he busies himself, etc. I was afraid I wasn't doing enough, but you're right that it might just be that we've found a good place for us and just a *little* more would be good, not double or triple more, lol. And you're right, it hadn't occurred to me that he might have a jump in independence in 4th, hmm. I've heard that, but I hadn't thought of it.

 

Well thank you for explaining all that!

Yes, there has been a jump for him in 4th grade. He works almost totally independently now, has gone to regular note paper, capitalizes most proper nouns and writes the first sentence of his narrations. So yes, a little more, not double or triple.

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Freesia, I'm curious, what chores does your dd do? My ds helps with the dishwasher, takes out the compost, puts away his laundry, and helps pick up his floor to run the roomba. We haven't added anything in a while. He's also learning to brush his teeth.

 

She does breakfast loading and clean up the counter (although I often do it with her).

She takes out the compost.

She pours milk for everyone at dinner, folds laundry and puts it away.

She is on a rotation to feed the cat and scoop litter.

She picks up her room, showers, tooth brushes.

Once a week she waters the plants, delivers toilet paper to all the bathrooms and sweeps the stairs.

(We rotate some chores so at other times she has swept the kitchen/dining room or set the table; sometimes she has a bathroom to wipe down and toilet to swish)

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My current 3rd grader is a precocious (across the board) little guy with excellent fine motor skills and an independent streak. He looks very different from my previous two 3rd grade boys.

 

He is doing Writing and Rhetoric Fable and types up his stories. He can write a narration on his own (I don't expect that of a 3rd grader). I give him assignments and he goes off and does them. He's really a dream to homeschool. :lol: When he's not doing school, he plays with Legos or Smart Links (Wendy's kids meal toy that I've actually kept!), plays hockey (he's a goalie), or he has his nose in his Kindle Paperwhite. He loves to read and was an early reader.

 

Now my ASD kid in 3rd grade could not write a coherent sentence. He could give an oral narration fairly well. He's been able to do that since K, surprisingly. He used to give an oral narration of his Bible class story at speech therapy each week. :) But writing it down... In 5th grade we have finally worked up to a basic paragraph, and there is a lot of whining and complaining. He complains about all things school. He does not enjoy school. He does like his AoPS math (Prealgebra), though I have to do much of the writing, and I have to read it to him, as he would not be able to learn the information by reading that yet. He was so bored to tears with 6th grade math programs though, so I bumped him up. For fun, he does Legos and Smart Links and occasionally reads, but not as much as his brothers. He is only reading at grade level, so it's still a bit of work. We're slogging through as best we can.

 

My lands, that's CRAZY how different they are. :D And yeah, my dd was like that, highly productive in 3rd. Well she didn't type, but just able to do a lot. Then there's ds, lol. What are Smart Links? I need to go look them up, since they're so universally liked in your house. :D  Paragraphs, hadn't thought about that. I'm not a huge fan of them. My plan right now is to stick with the sequential skills curriculum that seems to be working with him and just PLOD.

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Wendyroo, thanks for sharing all that. I'll have to go look up Hoffman Academy piano. Your one sentence narrations are interesting. That's about where he would be at. I'm pulling book lists for him to read right now, so he could do that. It sounds like you keep him good and busy with structure and expectations! :)

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I am outsourcing a lot right now since I've returned to school. Our week looks like this:

 

Math: 4 x per week of Beast Academy online, 60 minutes each, plus 90 minute BA class at AoPS Academy

 

Lit: 1 x per week 60 minutes Athena's class, plus the written (typed) homework assignment

 

French: Duolingo 2 x per week, 30 minutes, plus 1 hour class at Language City Academy

 

Latin: This year is mostly review for him. He is doing the BBLL online class 90 minutes 1 x per week, plus the homework assignment

 

Hebrew: Memrise goal, 4 x per week

 

Science: Athena's chemistry class, 60 minutes 1 x per week, Mel Chemistry kits with my husband (needs to happen more often)

 

History: SOTW4 on audio 1-2 x per week

 

Charter school class 1 x per week: art, Lego, Spanish, and guitar.

 

He is almost entirely independent for all of this. He also reads for pleasure an hour+ per day. He will take the National Mythology Exam, the Exploratory Latin Exam, and Math Kangaroo this year.

 

My course load will lighten next semester, so we will spend more time on writing (finishing WWE series) and grammar (MCT). He may also take a Bravewriter writing course.

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Dd just turned 8 a few days ago. This year, I have introduced an assignment book for her -- I just write down the things she is expected to do on her own in a spiral notebook, and draw little boxes for her to check off.

 

Daily tasks

Practice Tae Kwon Do.

Practice recorder (when I give her lessons, I tell her how many times to practice each song).

Read her assigned book for 10 minutes, or a chapter.

 

Once or twice a week, cursive practice is included.

Sometimes she needs to continue work on an art project, and that gets put on the list, too.

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My second is a very young 3rd - I just use the grade label for admin purposes, as that is where she would be in our district and a lot of activities are organized by grade. Her work falls into both gr 2 and 3 levels. She is relatively good at narration, is barely getting started with spelling and independent writing.

 

We do all our work in the morning, at the kitchen table. I am therefore more or less available, depending on the need.

 

Our day starts at 8:30 (as they finish breakfast) with Morning Feast. Morning Feast is anywhere from 1-2 hours and includes Bible, prayer, memory work, poetry, French, literature, and read alouds from various subjects. This is very geared for the gr 3-4 level.

 

After Feast we do independent work. I make checklists at the beginning of each week, with daily assignments. It keeps me on track as much as them. The days' work is grouped into work they can do independently and work to do with me.

 

3rd grader's independent work: journal, Explode the Code, Pentime Handwriting, Xtra Math.

 

Work with me: the end of OPGTR, buddy reading, MM3, copywork (used for grammar & spelling). Once a week each we all do chemistry or history together.

 

She practices piano daily for about 15 mins. She has daily and weekly jobs, totally about 1/2 an hour. Weekly ones are things like clean out van, sweep basement, dust house, fold and put away her laundry.

 

She keeps herself busy playing with little brothers, biking with friends on the street, playing Playmobil and listening to audio books during quiet time, climbing everything, making up races and things like that, and doing craft projects with her sister.

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Just for perks, what does your 2nd grade male narration look like? :D

Here are a few oral narrations I've written in DS' science notebook:

 

"All mammals have warm blood. They also breathe oxygen."

 

"Bacteria were among the first living organisms on Earth. They come in lots of different shapes and sizes. Some of them can photosynthesise!"

 

"The most dangerous type of avalanche is called a slab avalanche. They are usually triggered by changes in the weather."

 

Eta: these are all from the first half of second grade.

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Well, all my kids (except one) have been late bloomers. So, y'alls lists are really huge & overwhelming. I have a second grader & an older fourth grader. (He could be a fifth grader by age.) Both are boys. They are still both in the "learning to read" phase rather than the "reading to learn" phase. 

 

Almost all of these are four times per week:

Reading aloud to me (15 min each)

Religion (30 min together) - catechism/memorization

Spelling (30 min each) - Spell to Write & Read (2nd grader mostly works on phonograms through games because he was in tears working on spelling lists even though he spells better than the older one. We'll restart spelling lists after Christmas sometime.)

Math (30 min each)

"Enrichment" (30 min together) - Six week rotations of grammar (Sentence Family), states/capitals memorization, Reader's Theater, Logic Puzzles, and WWE.

Science/History (30 min) - First semester is science (Ellen McHenry's Elements). Second semester will be SOTW2. Younger mostly bails from science, but the older one loves it. We'll stretch it out to last the whole semester as there is lots of opportunities for rabbit trails.

The older one is also trying to learn Welch. That's slow as I don't have a slot in our schedule for it. When we get the chance, we have an e-book & audio files we are working through.

 

That's only about 2 hrs 15 minutes of school a day (spread over five days) for each one. The rest of the time, they are playing, building things, listening to audio books, running around, and amusing themselves. Neither have done narrations that I write down. We're focused on the basics and doing some "fun" school. Both do a little math independently, but that is it. My kids generally don't go independent until they are older. When it happens, it is a pretty dramatic shift.

 

ETA: All kids have chores. Younger has currently has the daily maintenance of the kids' bathroom, wiping down kitchen counters, and switching out towels. Older boy has vacuuming the living room, picking up the basement school area, and emptying/reloading the dishwasher. Some chores rotate through all the kids on a quarterly basis & some are assigned longer-term (a couple of years).

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My lands, that's CRAZY how different they are. :D And yeah, my dd was like that, highly productive in 3rd. Well she didn't type, but just able to do a lot. Then there's ds, lol. What are Smart Links? I need to go look them up, since they're so universally liked in your house. :D  Paragraphs, hadn't thought about that. I'm not a huge fan of them. My plan right now is to stick with the sequential skills curriculum that seems to be working with him and just PLOD.

 

Smart Links on Ebay: http://www.ebay.com/bhp/smart-links-toys

 

I don't know if you can even get them outside of fast food toys? They really are a fabulous kids meal toy. We don't get kids meals anymore now (just cheaper to buy them a pile of burgers and separate fries), but for a while there I'd occasionally get them one because these toys were actually decent. :lol: This week, they've been building satellites, Magic School Bus, space ships, etc.

 

For writing, my 5th grader is using Writing Skills Book A by Diane Hanbury King. It started out with simple sentences and eventually works up to some basic paragraphs. Today he actually wrote a GOOD paragraph, staying on one topic and not going off in the weeds with silliness. It was a little silly, but not crazy silly. Only problem is that it didn't really meet the assignment. Writing with this child might be the death of me. :lol: I thought my oldest was difficult at this age, but he just didn't want to write much (he'd COUNT his words during an oral narration if he knew he'd have to write it... even in 1st grade!). He would at least stay on topic and be somewhat serious about the assignment, even if he didn't want to do it (and he's a fine writer now in 8th grade - not writing like the really good WTM writers on this forum, but good enough for his age). My 5th grader... ahhhhhhh!!!!! :)

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Oh that's hilarious. We eat at Wendy's all the time, because they're up the road from our speech therapy, and we never buy their happy meals! LOL 

 

You're right, maybe I'd be a fan of the Writing Skills books starting then. I got something in the progression and had a worker try to use them. Didn't like the results, so we went another direction. But it really could have just been too soon, good point.

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My third-grader is a young one (late July birthday). She falls fairly solidly third grade in most of her work, however she is a visual and asynchronous learner so it's difficult to peg her down sometimes.

 

She does:

Grammar (FLL 3)

Writing (WWE 2)

Spelling (R&S 3)

Reading (what I pick)

Copywork (Spelling You See)

Piano (Faber)

Math (Math Mammoth)

 

And she participates in SOTW and mystery science. She's not the best at answering comprehension questions, bug she can narrate well. (Not sure how that works...) Shems definitely not an auditory learner and she needs a visual to memorize stuff so she's the least invested during our memory work in the AM.

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