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Beowulf’s Grammar by Guesthollow

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We are also working through it. We have enjoyed everything we've done so far, though we've had to do some tweaking to make it fit us. (For example, I have not printed anything except consumable sheets. I view the manual on my iPad and stream the student book from my computer to our tv.)

 

My girls (who are animal lovers) think Beowulf is hilariously awesome.

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We have just started it, too. It has been a hit, even though we are speeding through the obligatory "Noun" chapter. Because, you know, we have been through 3 different LA curriculum, so dd is pretty clear that a noun is a person, place, or thing. *However* - Beowulf's Grammar thoroughly demonstrates nouns-as-ideas. When I was a kid, they always and only used "democracy" as the example of an "idea noun", leading me to think that only ideologies could be that kind of noun. BG uses examples that kids are able to relate much better to. So far, it is an excellent program and I have nothing but good things to say about it.

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We're currently working through it. Any specific questions about it?

 

 

We are working through it also. First time in 12 years of homeschooling that my kids are actually "getting it" and they actually like doing grammar!

 

 

We are also working through it. We have enjoyed everything we've done so far, though we've had to do some tweaking to make it fit us. (For example, I have not printed anything except consumable sheets. I view the manual on my iPad and stream the student book from my computer to our tv.)

 

My girls (who are animal lovers) think Beowulf is hilariously awesome.

 

 

We have just started it, too. It has been a hit, even though we are speeding through the obligatory "Noun" chapter. Because, you know, we have been through 3 different LA curriculum, so dd is pretty clear that a noun is a person, place, or thing. *However* - Beowulf's Grammar thoroughly demonstrates nouns-as-ideas. When I was a kid, they always and only used "democracy" as the example of an "idea noun", leading me to think that only ideologies could be that kind of noun. BG uses examples that kids are able to relate much better to. So far, it is an excellent program and I have nothing but good things to say about it.

 

 

I'm not the OP, but I had a few questions for those of you who are using the curriculum...

 

Is it designed to be covered during one school year, or multiple years?  

 

About how long each day do you spend on a lesson?

 

Also, can it be used with multiple grade levels?

 

Thanks!

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I'm not the OP, but I had a few questions for those of you who are using the curriculum...

 

Is it designed to be covered during one school year, or multiple years?

 

About how long each day do you spend on a lesson?

 

Also, can it be used with multiple grade levels?

 

Thanks!

We will probably finish in a school year, but we're approaching it as we would any Guest Hollow program: a buffet to pick and choose.

 

There is a recommended schedule provided with the program, but we just loosely follow it. Our lessons are running 15-20 minutes, and only printing reviews and activities that we want to do.

 

I am using Beowulf's Grammar with a 4th and 6th grader that have had little prior grammar exposure (and who were previously, this school year, whining about Easy Grammar). They enjoy BG.

 

The most time consuming aspect, for me, was the prep work. There are a LOT of pages to print, if you print everything. I did not; I only printed the activities and reviews. We view the teaching portions (comic book style, which my girls love) digitally -- which required a bunch of pdf splitting/multi-device document sharing/etc. The files for the entire program are very large (too big to view in iBooks as is).

 

Other than those technical issues, we love it. I'd love it more if I could buy a ready made version of the comic, and then separate student activity books. But I'm lazy like that :p

Edited by alisoncooks
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There is a recommended schedule in the teacher's guide. From that, it would take 33 weeks doing it 4 days a week. If you use the review sheets (included), it would be 5 days a week, with the 5th day being just a worksheet to review.

 

Lessons could be as short or as long as your kids can handle. We've done 10 minute lessons and 40 minute lessons, depending on how much we have going on that day and how much attention span my kids have for the topic we're covering.

 

I'm currently using it with two kids at the same time. I read it aloud to them and they take turns doing the exercises (mostly orally or on our boogie board). 

 

I also use it digitally, only printing as needed. 

 

My kids are really enjoying it and it gets lots of giggles.

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Thanks for this post! I had to go check it out and not only does it look amazing, her free Otter's Chemistry schedule is awesome! What a cool resource :)

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We will probably finish in a school year, but we're approaching it as we would any Guest Hollow program: a buffet to pick and choose.

 

There is a recommended schedule provided with the program, but we just loosely follow it. Our lessons are running 15-20 minutes, and only printing reviews and activities that we want to do.

 

I am using Beowulf's Grammar with a 4th and 6th grader that have had little prior grammar exposure (and who were previously, this school year, whining about Easy Grammar). They enjoy BG.

 

The most time consuming aspect, for me, was the prep work. There are a LOT of pages to print, if you print everything. I did not; I only printed the activities and reviews. We view the teaching portions (comic book style, which my girls love) digitally -- which required a bunch of pdf splitting/multi-device document sharing/etc. The files for the entire program are very large (too big to view in iBooks as is).

 

Other than those technical issues, we love it. I'd love it more if I could buy a ready made version of the comic, and then separate student activity books. But I'm lazy like that :p

Oh, that stinks that it is too big for ibooks, that is how I like to use pdf programs. If Guest Hollow happens to pop into this thread I'd love a separate student activity book, printing lots of color is expensive and being too big to use on iBooks makes it a hassle.

 

I had not heard of this, this looks great for next year. I can see using this with my upcoming 3rd grader and maybe have my upcoming 6th grader tag along to solidify/review what she is learning this year (depending on how well she seems to retain it all).

Edited by soror
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Most of my questions have been answered—but wondering for which grade levels it’s best suited?

I can't recall if the program gives an age range, but I'm going to say 2nd to 5th/6th. There is some writing, as well as cutting/pasting activities, so depending on your child's ability, it could be enjoyable for first graders. (Clarifying that *MY* kids would NOT have been able to do this in the first grade. I think being able to read is helpful for this program, as well as being able to write comfortably.)

 

I have a 4th and 6th grader using it. My 4th grader is reading/writing-challenged, but we make it work, and she thinks it's fun. It could be a little "young" for the 6th grader, but she still likes it.

Edited by alisoncooks

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I'm using it with 3rd, 6th, and 7th graders. We work together. I print everything and the have binders it goes in. I have a color printer with cheap generic ink. It takes us less than a half hour a day for sure. My older kids are enjoying the cut and paste stuff it's been a long time since school wasn't "hours" of handwriting, and the "3Dish" hands-on approach is making it all make sense for them.

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We are also currently using it and enjoying it.  There is a lot to print.  I did end up printing it all since we can do it inexpensively.  My DS is in 4th grade using it and for the first time ever he has been asking to do grammar rather than throwing fits over it, so for us its a win.  He also seems to be retaining it.  The hands on things are really nice.  I have two other kids eyeing it wondering when they can do it too.  We spend anywhere from 10 - 30 minutes a day on it, not following the schedule, but working as we can on it.  We plan on finishing it in a year - 18 months.

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Oh, that stinks that it is too big for ibooks, that is how I like to use pdf programs. If Guest Hollow happens to pop into this thread I'd love a separate student activity book, printing lots of color is expensive and being too big to use on iBooks makes it a hassle.

 

I had not heard of this, this looks great for next year. I can see using this with my upcoming 3rd grader and maybe have my upcoming 6th grader tag along to solidify/review what she is learning this year (depending on how well she seems to retain it all).

 

Good idea to separate it into a separate activity book...I will consider that for the future. :-) (And I love reading all the great feedback from the other posters!! Totally made my day.)

Edited by jenn&charles

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