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Laura Corin

Good recipes with cashew butter?

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Husband bought some and it's just sitting in the fridge.Savoury not sweet, please.

Edited by Laura Corin

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We use it on place of peanut butter (allergy) for pad Thai. It would also be fabulous in the satay sauce that accompanies Ina Garten's Lemon Chicken

 

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/grilled-lemon-chicken-skewers-with-satay-dip-recipe-1953711

 

Can substitute for peanut butter anywhere you like.

Edited by SusanC
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For savory I would do as a pp said and substitute it for pb, lots of Thai dishes have PB and some African dishes too.

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I use cashew butter in my Butter Chicken.   This is the original recipe I use, only I hardly ever use chicken breasts anymore.  I usually use bone-in chicken thighs, as I think the flavor is better with bone-in chicken.  

 

Butter Chicken

 

4 skinless raw chicken breasts
1 teaspoon tandoori paste
14 1/2 oz / 398 ml can diced tomatoes
2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons canola oil
3 bay leaves
1 inch ginger root -- peeled
3 large cloves garlic
1 medium onion -- roughly chopped 
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper 
1/4 teaspoon sugar 
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 cup natural cashew butter 
1 cup milk 
1/2 cup water 
1/2 cup cream or half-and-half 
1/2 teaspoon garam masala 
cilantro to garnish optional

Preheat oven to 350 F.
Rub tandoori paste evenly on the skinless chicken pieces and let them rest in the fridge while you prepare the rest of the ingredients.

Prepare and measure out all ingredients ahead of time: this is not a chop-as-you-go endeavour. Use little bowls or plates to get organized. Items that are added at the same time can be put in the same bowl.

Ginger, garlic and onions can be finely ground together in a blender or food processor. You want them very finely minced, but not completely pureed. Scrape down the sides as necessary, to ensure a smooth texture. Remove to a bowl, so they're ready to add when needed. Puree the tomatoes separately, and put them in a separate bowl.

Heat the butter in a large, non-stick skillet over medium heat. Add the bay leaves, the onion/ginger/garlic paste, and fry until golden brown and all water has evaporated. Stir as needed during the process so it doesn't burn. Add the tomato puree, chile powder, salt and sugar, and fry until the water has all evaporated and the oil separates out into shiny droplets. This can take up to 10 minutes, so be patient and stir a lot. The mixture will be quite thick, almost dry.

Add the cashew paste and continue to fry another few seconds, and then add the milk and water slowly, stirring the whole time, and raise the heat to bring the mixture to a boil. The sauce should be thick and almost custard-y in texture. You can always add more water later, if needed.

When the sauce has come to a boil, turn off the burner. Slide the tandoori-rubbed chicken into the pan, and spoon the sauce over each piece. Cover and bake in the pre-heated oven for 30 minutes (boneless) or 45 minutes (for bone-in chicken). Remove the chicken carefully from the sauce. Remove bones if necessary, and chop the chicken meat into large bite-sized pieces. Return the chicken to the pan and stir into the sauce.

Over medium heat, add the cream and garam masala, and cook for a further 5 minutes. Garnish with cilantro, if you like.

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Thank you.  So it looks as if I could add it with liquid as protein/thickener to a sauce?  So I could, for example, make a veggie stew with cumin and coriander, and when I added the liquid after frying the initial ingredients, just add the cashew butter to taste?  Is that how it's used? 

 

Thanks

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Thank you.  So it looks as if I could add it with liquid as protein/thickener to a sauce?  So I could, for example, make a veggie stew with cumin and coriander, and when I added the liquid after frying the initial ingredients, just add the cashew butter to taste?  Is that how it's used? 

 

Thanks

 

Pretty much.  It won't get as thick as if you used something like cornstarch or flour, but it does help thicken up the sauce a touch, as well as adding some body. 

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I once made an African Groundnut Stew with cashew butter accidentally (I opened the wrong jar).  I have always made it that way since then.  It is always a hit.  I think the cashew is milder in taste than peanut, but it has a depth of flavour peanut lacks.  Paired with the hot pepper of the stew, it's a great balance in flavour. 

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I once made an African Groundnut Stew with cashew butter accidentally (I opened the wrong jar).  I have always made it that way since then.  It is always a hit.  I think the cashew is milder in taste than peanut, but it has a depth of flavour peanut lacks.  Paired with the hot pepper of the stew, it's a great balance in flavour. 

 

This is a great idea and I'm going to use it!  Now I want to make some Peanut Chicken and use cashew butter instead.  It's one of my DD's favorite dishes, but it doesn't take long before I'm tired of the peanut taste.  I bet cashew would be so much better.  

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