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Robin M

Book a Week 2017 - BW 42: Happy Birthday Robert Pinsky

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Hi everyone!

 

So glad to hear you and your family are safe and able to go home, Rose :grouphug:

 

Colleen, congratulations to your son! :hurray:

 

A big thank you to Kareni for talking about The Ghost and Mrs. Muir by R. A. Dick. Loved this! I've seen the movie many times and always enjoyed it and after Kareni mentioned it I decided I just HAD to read the book. So glad I did! The banter between the Captain and Lucy was good and I liked having the extra characters there, too.

 

How Not to Run a B & B by Bobby Hutchinson. This was a mostly entertaining look at running a B&B. I read it early in the morning when I was having trouble sleeping.

 

I started a spooky read - In the Grip of It - and have about a quarter of it left to read. I would have read it during my sleepless nights but it was starting to freak me out a bit. Not so much the story but the style of writing is what is getting into my head. I'll finish it during the daytime. :)

 

Can I get a few suggestions from everyone? I'm trying to find some good books for my 10yo and 17yo daughters. Their birthdays are almost here and they both asked for books! It's hard to find stuff that they will like, haven't already read, and is quality and yet will not upset their dad. He is NOT a reader and tends to be very conservative in what he thinks the girls should read. sigh

 

My 10yo is a voracious reader and has asked for long books - over 300 pages.She's read so much that is appropriate for her age and it's really hard to find books that are long enough without being too adult. In the past she has enjoyed The Warrior series, the Little House books, Harry Potter, Percy Jackson, the Hunger Games (yeah, I know - she's the youngest and everyone else had read it so I let her read it, too), and the All Creatures Great and Small series.

 

My 17yo hasn't been much of a reader in the past so I am anxious to find her some books that she will enjoy. She's read much of the same as my younger dd with the addition of manga like the Naruto series, Death Note, and My Love Story. She doesn't want romances and leans toward science fiction. Historical fiction is ok as long as it isn't centered on a girl who wants to meet a boy and get married, lol. So far I've gotten her Code Name Verity https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/1423152883/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s02?ie=UTF8&psc=1and Redshirts https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/0765334798/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1.

 

 

eta - Congratulations to everyone who has finished War and Peace :thumbup: - I'm still working on it. :)

 

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I second Amy’s list! My 17yo dd really enjoyed The Lunar Chronicles last year. She also a fan of James Dashner (The Maze Runner). She also enjoys Gail Carringer series that begins with Etiquette and Espionage...oops that’s also on Amy’s list.

 

ETA...Dd also enjoyed all The Ranger’s Apprentice books

Edited by Angel
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Mothersweets...dd and I are thinking. Things she read and enjoyed at those ages.

 

For the 10yo Paolini's Eragon series. Definitely long. :lol:

 

For the 17yo maybe The Others https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/15711341-written-in-red?ac=1&from_search=true. These are supernatural in terms of were, vampires, etc but very different then anything else I have read. My dh survived.....

 

Another idea is Terry Pratchett. Dd recommends Mort.

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Mothersweets...dd and I are thinking. Things she read and enjoyed at those ages.

 

For the 10yo Paolini's Eragon series. Definitely long. :lol:

 

For the 17yo maybe The Others https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/15711341-written-in-red?ac=1&from_search=true. These are supernatural in terms of were, vampires, etc but very different then anything else I have read. My dh survived.....

 

Another idea is Terry Pratchett. Dd recommends Mort.

 

Yes. The Mort series has been a hit at our house as well!

 

I second Amy’s list! My 17yo dd really enjoyed The Lunar Chronicles last year. She also a fan of James Dashner (The Maze Runner). She also enjoys Gail Carringer series that begins with Etiquette and Espionage...oops that’s also on Amy’s list.

 

ETA...Dd also enjoyed all The Ranger’s Apprentice books

 

 

Jotting down a few titles for Sophia ... :)

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Yes. The Mort series has been a hit at our house as well!

 

 

 

Pratchett's Tiffany Aching series is lovely for teens of all ages.  ;) My 80 year old friend was rereading them this summer for a lift.

 

ETA: The series starts with The Wee Free Men.

 

Edited by Jane in NC
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For the 17yo maybe The Others https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/15711341-written-in-red?ac=1&from_search=true. These are supernatural in terms of were, vampires, etc but very different then anything else I have read. My dh survived.....

 

I'll second this recommendation; the series begins with Written In Red,

 

ETA:  We send out a holiday letter each year to friends and family, and I typically mention our favorite books and movies.  This series will be included as one of my favorites. 

 

While the series does not feature sex between the two leads, there is a very slow romance that develops over the course of the five books.  There is a significant amount of violence throughout the series, and

people get eaten.

 

Might Andy Weir's The Martian: A Novel be an option?  It does contain some profanity.

 

 

Regards,

Kareni

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Thought of a book for your older DD ... The Book Thief. I think there's some swear words but not the ones that are really offensive. 

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Thank you to everyone for the book suggestions! 

 

Non-fiction is a great idea! 

 

They have both read the Maze Runner series; 17yo has read and seen The Martian; I know she has seen The Book Thief so am not sure if she would want to read it (she's super picky that way  :glare:).

 

Ranger's Apprentice series sounds great for my younger dd! 

 

All of these suggestions sound like they will be something my daughters will enjoy. It's hard for me to choose on my own because I tend to like romance, historical fiction (you know me! haha) and sci-fi/fantasy isn't something I normally read. Thanks again! 

 

 

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Good morning from Paris!

 

We arrived yesterday morning after a sleepless night on the plane— unusual for me. But thanks to my ds I had the perfect mindless sci fi audiobook to keep me company, The Fold by Peter Cline. Experiments in creating a fold in space time naturally go wrong, leading to a possible alien invasion of earth. Still have an hour to go and when I left off the Marines had been called in. The hero of the book, btw, is a high school English teacher.

 

To combat jet lag, we spent a glorious day outside, enjoying beautiful warm weather and walking over 6 miles. I made it to Shakespeare and Company but was too tired to do any serious book shopping. I wanted to buy something Significant from the storied shop, looked in vain for for the Hemingway Michigan-based stories, so settled on an Alan Furst novel set in Paris.

 

At one of those used book stalls along the Seine, my dh found copies of the first comic book series he worked on 30 years ago. It is an obscure series — not household name superheroes, so it was a bit of a surprise!

 

Colleen — congrats to your ds! That is an impressive accomplishment,

 

Glad you are heading home, Rose.

 

Good luck to those in the midst of moving, whether packing or unpacking. And get well, Heather and Loesje!!

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I didn't realize you were heading to Paris, Jenn. Lovely! Enviable! I tend to do a good bit of traveling here & there, but it's been a fistful of years since I was in Europe. Live vicariously for us, won't you? And in return, I shall live vicariously for you while in the nearly-comparable destination of Columbus, Georgia. Ahem! I do always find that every place, with a few notable exceptions (Wells, Nevada comes to mind) has something to offer. Columbus, with its river walk, historic district, and a handful of surprisingly good museums, proves the case. 

 

Look forward to hearing more about Parisian book shops and so on ~ and of course you now have to tell us the name of the comic book series!

 

 

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Hi everyone, and hugs and tea to all who need it.  Jenn maybe a cafe-au-lait for you and a baguette with butter/jam.

 

Seems like it's never until Tuesday that I can get online and actually respond to BaW.  I am being a good girl and not opening the laptop between Fri eve through Mon morn as I tend to fall down the work wormhole if I do.

 

I was able to finish one book last week and was<<thisclose>> to finishing another before our weekly deadline...which would have meant I accomplished my Bookreads challenge of 61 (prime!) books this year.  The book was a memoir-slash-personal essay compilation that I am counting as my local author, as she grew up east of me, lives in Chicago, but wrote it in a beach house about 10 miles from where I live.  It was Megan Stielstra's The Wrong Way to Save Your Life

 

In the Kevin Bacon six-degrees thing, I am maybe 1 degree removed from this writer through I don't know maybe 5 different people who know her.  That's kind of the way it is in Chicago, frankly, and probably most other places on the globe.  I enjoyed the book very much and it read well as a linked series (the essays in other words flowed well together).  Her unifying theme was fear.  She is, among many things, a writing teacher, so there might be something in this book for those of you who also write.

 

The other book I nearly finished was Lincoln at the Bardo, by George Saunders.  I have always been a fan of his short stories but I am reserving judgment on this, his first novel, until I finish it. 

 

Mothersweets, my 13yo enjoys YA and reads a lot of the more literary ones that usually don't involve I don't know vampires and unrequited love.  She recommends The Inquisitor's Tale, which is somewhat long, for either daughter.  She also recommends Dickens!!  She really got into him last year, having had to read David Copperfield for school...she then picked up Bleak House and then Oliver Twist.  :)  And she says nobody can go wrong with Tolkien.  (Her tastes for pleasure reading, fwiw, are in the vein of Kids With Problems Not Of Their Own Making, like Eleanor and Park, The Hate U Give and all of John Green's output, as she's reading Turtles All the Way Down now...so not something I would recommend to your dds, but *I* think is safe/ok for my dd to explore.)

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Mothersweets, my 13yo enjoys YA and reads a lot of the more literary ones that usually don't involve I don't know vampires and unrequited love.  She recommends The Inquisitor's Tale, which is somewhat long, for either daughter.  She also recommends Dickens!!  She really got into him last year, having had to read David Copperfield for school...she then picked up Bleak House and then Oliver Twist.  :)  And she says nobody can go wrong with Tolkien.  (Her tastes for pleasure reading, fwiw, are in the vein of Kids With Problems Not Of Their Own Making, like Eleanor and Park, The Hate U Give and all of John Green's output, as she's reading Turtles All the Way Down now...so not something I would recommend to your dds, but *I* think is safe/ok for my dd to explore.)

 

Laura - I think you'd even enjoy The Inquisitor's Tale. Great book.

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Enjoy your trip, Jenn!

 

I shall live vicariously for you while in the nearly-comparable destination of Columbus, Georgia. Ahem! I do always find that every place, with a few notable exceptions (Wells, Nevada comes to mind) has something to offer. Columbus, with its river walk, historic district, and a handful of surprisingly good museums, proves the case. 

 

 

 

My first teaching job was in Americus, Georgia. Carter Country. Peanut Country. There was NOTHING to do there (late 1970s, Carter was still president). My fellow young teachers and I used to go to either Macon or Columbus to shop and to go dancing at clubs. Columbus was closer but Macon was bigger. I didn't realize Columbus has good museums and an historic district but my age and interests might have had something to do with that. :)

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A one day only currently free classic for Kindle readers ~

 

The Man of Last Resort: Or, The Clients of Randolph Mason by Melville Davisson Post

 

About the Author

Melville Davisson Post (1869 1930) was a West Virginia author and attorney best known for his stories featuring Uncle Abner, an amateur detective and backwoodsman who solves mysteries and hands out justice in the years before the Civil War. Post s other iconic creation is the amoral lawyer Randolph Mason, whose exploits on behalf of his criminal clients helped to establish the legal thriller genre.

 

 

"In New York’s Plaza Hotel, a gambler, a Virginia gentleman, and a failed lawyer named Alfred Randal come together to form a three-man political machine. Rather than contend with Tammany Hall, they set out west to take control of the Arizona statehouse. Soon Randal is governor, the Virginian is auditor, and the gambler is secretary of state. Their reach absolute, their power unquestioned, the trio has only one problem: They have robbed the treasury blind.
 
To keep himself out of prison, Randal returns to New York to beg the help of Randolph Mason, a brilliant lawyer who never hesitates to help bad men escape justice. In these classic stories, America’s most dangerous legal mind assists all manner of liars, crooks, and scoundrels—proving once again that even a master criminal is only as smart as his attorney."

**

 

Also currently free ~

 

Christian fiction:  A Nest of Sparrows  by Deborah Raney

 

Romantic suspense:  Reckless (Shattered Sisters, Book 1) by Maggie Shayne

 

Comic mystery: Out of the Past (The Reed Ferguson series) by Renee Pawlish

 

Epic sword and sorcery: The Cycle of Arawn  by Edward W. Robertson

 

Urban fantasy:  Moira's Song  by Tawnya Lee

 

LGBT fantasy: The Lodestar of Ys (The…   by Amy Rae Durreson

 

 

Regards,

Kareni

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I just finished a lovely book: The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating. The author wrote this book while she was bedridden, chronically ill, about the life of her companion, a brown wood snail that a friend had brought to her bedside. It was a wonderful read, and i highly recommend it, even if you aren't particularly interested in chronic illness or snails.

 

It's our last day in Half Moon Bay - we extended our stay because the air quality at home is so bad. We'll return tomorrow, though, and hope that the chance of rain on Thursday cleans things up.

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I just finished a lovely book: The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating. The author wrote this book while she was bedridden, chronically ill, about the life of her companion, a brown wood snail that a friend had brought to her bedside. It was a wonderful read, and i highly recommend it, even if you aren't particularly interested in chronic illness or snails.

 

It's our last day in Half Moon Bay - we extended our stay because the air quality at home is so bad. We'll return tomorrow, though, and hope that the chance of rain on Thursday cleans things up.

My book club read that one in August. It was unanimously liked. Hoping for rain for you guys!
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I just finished a lovely book: The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating. The author wrote this book while she was bedridden, chronically ill, about the life of her companion, a brown wood snail that a friend had brought to her bedside. It was a wonderful read, and i highly recommend it, even if you aren't particularly interested in chronic illness or snails.

 

It's our last day in Half Moon Bay - we extended our stay because the air quality at home is so bad. We'll return tomorrow, though, and hope that the chance of rain on Thursday cleans things up.

 

That sounds lovely and has really good reviews. It's available for Kindle at my library but I have so many other books in the works that I put it on my wish list for another time.

 

Hoping for rain for you guys. 

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I finished The Burning Girl which was not very good. I kept on because it was easy and I kept hoping for an ending worthy of the foreshadowing in the opening, but it was not to be. I'm additionally disappointed because it was from my Powell's subscription and I'm surprised they thought it worthy of inclusion. Reading other reviews, I'm not the only one who thought it suffered from multiple problems, especially a strangely inconclusive ending and a voice that was too mature for that of a young teenage girl.

 

Next up: Intrusion, which was mentioned a couple of threads a go as disturbing, so I thought October might be a good time.

 

Kareni, you provide some of the best links.

 

 

I have started To Kill a Mockingbird as it's this month's classic on my calendar. I feel like I am one of the very few who have not read this book. 

 

DH has also not read it and will be joining DS when he reads it laster this year.

Congrats to all who have finished War and Peace! 

 

Rose, I'm happy to hear you are headed home. We are also hoping rain comes Thursday, esp to your area.

 

I'm low on time ~ need to make travel arrangements & hopefully fly out Tuesday night. Yes, my guy got the "go" and graduates Friday! I was honestly a bit taken by surprise since going straight through is rather rare. Super impressed & amazed, but from a logistical standpoint...ack! Thanks for the good thoughts, all. 

 

 

:hurray:

 

Hi everyone!

 

Can I get a few suggestions from everyone? I'm trying to find some good books for my 10yo and 17yo daughters. Their birthdays are almost here and they both asked for books! It's hard to find stuff that they will like, haven't already read, and is quality and yet will not upset their dad. He is NOT a reader and tends to be very conservative in what he thinks the girls should read. sigh

 

My 10yo is a voracious reader and has asked for long books - over 300 pages.She's read so much that is appropriate for her age and it's really hard to find books that are long enough without being too adult. In the past she has enjoyed The Warrior series, the Little House books, Harry Potter, Percy Jackson, the Hunger Games (yeah, I know - she's the youngest and everyone else had read it so I let her read it, too), and the  All Creatures Great and Small series. 

 

 My 17yo hasn't been much of a reader in the past so I am anxious to find her some books that she will enjoy. She's read much of the same as my younger dd with the addition of manga like the Naruto series, Death Note, and My Love Story. She doesn't want romances and leans toward science fiction. Historical fiction is ok as long as it isn't centered on a girl who wants to meet a boy and get married, lol. So far I've gotten her Code Name Verity https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/1423152883/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s02?ie=UTF8&psc=1and Redshirts https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/0765334798/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

 

The 10yo might be ready for Lord of The Rings or you can do a softer start with The Hobbit first.

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Jenn!

 

Have a great time.

 

I do hope you eat some wonderful pastries on my behalf! :D

 

Pastries??  I'd rather Jenn toast her BaW friends over a glass or two of French wine!

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OK, this is not book related but hedgehog news. I got home from my belated birthday party with friends and dh discovered I had not one but TWO hedgehogs in our back garden. Because they curl up when startled we all got a really good look at them.....I know, but the moment dh started taking the rubbish out they went into balls so we looked. How could we resist. One huge one that I think is the one I have been seeing and a smaller, lighter in colour one. The bunny's carrot peels are gone now. He will be disappointed in the morning because he knew he had them but only ate half because he is picky and hoards. ;) They are so cute! I am going to have to peel something for the bunny (hedgehogs ;) ) tomorrow. Obviously that is why they are coming here. :lol: Really no clue, suspect it's the oddly warm weather which is going to disappear any second. The neighbors all have their own theories on what hedgehogs eat and some put out offerings, meal worms, digestives, dried bananas, proper hedgehog food, to name a few. I have also been warned about fleas. :( Still happy.....

 

Jenn, have a wonderful time. I thought of your dh when walking by the stalls with the comic books last year so am thrilled he found his series there. How cool! :). The wine is good but I vote for pastries too. Not sure why but we always end up with rhubarb jam in France because it doesn't seem French. If you have a chance it's lovely on croissants.

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Here's a limited time offer for a free book ~

 
 
Tor.com Publishing Ebook Giveaway!
We’re offering you an irresistible Halloween treat: the chance to read the dark, enthralling start to Ruthanna Emrys’ acclaimed Innsmouth Legacy series for free right now!
9780765390912_FC_sm.jpg
Winter Tide is the first book in Emrys’ Lovecraftian saga about the last survivors of Innsmouth, which continues with Deep Roots in summer 2018.
For 72 hours only, sign up for our Tor.com Publishing monthly newsletter and we’ll send you the ebook edition of Winter Tide for free!
This offer is available worldwide from 12 PM EST on October 17th to 12 PM EST on October 20th.
By signing up for the Tor.com Publishing newsletter, you’ll receive updates on all of our titles and authors, plus excerpts, features, new acquisitions, sweepstakes and more.
Act fast and tell your friends!
**
 
Also a currently free book that is described as a dark gothic ~  Dark Desires (Dark Gothic Book 1) by Eve Silver.
 
 
Regards,
Kareni
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Thanks VC for the Maugham novel, The Magician. I'll be sure to pass it along to another of Maugham's fans (the Maughamettes?)

Oh we’re all just regular Maughams here.

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I read Dear World by Bana Alabed.  She's the little girl who started tweeting from inside East Aleppo during the siege of Aleppo last year.  Her house was targeted by the Assad regime because she was making contact with the outside world and showing how bad it was.  Dear World is her story.  She's just 8 years old and so it is told very simply and a bit overly optimistic as little ones often are (she was totally sure that once people on Twitter learned what was happening they'd be able to stop the whole war).  It is a heartbreaking child's eye view of war.  Every so often there is a bit by her mother explaining things that Bana may not have understood or that they kept from her so as not to add to the fear.  Those parts are written in the form of a letter to Bana.  It was a super fast read.  I highly recommend it.

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I finished Stoker's Manuscript today. I listened to the first 2/3 then read the last  1/3. It was entertaining, but I thought there were some plot contortions required to make it all work out . . . 

 

So looking forward to going home tomorrow! It's been a lovely respite to be down here, but I'm kind of missing my life. And my dh!!  Shannon has her big appointment at the Pediatric Autonomic Disorders clinic on Thursday, down in Oakland. I'm nervous but hopeful about that, and want to get home and settled before having to head down there.

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Good morning from Paris!

 

We arrived yesterday morning after a sleepless night on the plane— unusual for me. But thanks to my ds I had the perfect mindless sci fi audiobook to keep me company, The Fold by Peter Cline. Experiments in creating a fold in space time naturally go wrong, leading to a possible alien invasion of earth. Still have an hour to go and when I left off the Marines had been called in. The hero of the book, btw, is a high school English teacher.

 

To combat jet lag, we spent a glorious day outside, enjoying beautiful warm weather and walking over 6 miles. I made it to Shakespeare and Company but was too tired to do any serious book shopping. I wanted to buy something Significant from the storied shop, looked in vain for for the Hemingway Michigan-based stories, so settled on an Alan Furst novel set in Paris.

 

At one of those used book stalls along the Seine, my dh found copies of the first comic book series he worked on 30 years ago. It is an obscure series — not household name superheroes, so it was a bit of a surprise!

 

Colleen — congrats to your ds! That is an impressive accomplishment,

 

Glad you are heading home, Rose.

 

Good luck to those in the midst of moving, whether packing or unpacking. And get well, Heather and Loesje!!

How exciting!  Wine tasting is a must - especially my favorite Bordeaux.  I expect you'll have loads of fun and looking forward to lots of pictures.

 

 

Sandy, enjoying your tales of the hedgehogs!

 

 

Rose - Glad you are getting to go home to house and hubby.  Tell Shannon her Baw aunties are holding her in our thoughts.

 

 

 

 

A few links while roaming the web: 

 

Randomhouse just shared their list of best underrated horror novels to read this halloween.

 

PW's ten creepy psychological Thrillers

 

Bookscrollling's Best Haunted House and Ghost books of all time

 

Speaking of traveling the world -  check out Soho Crime.

 

 

 

Edited by Robin M
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Has anyone read Something Will Happen, You'll See? It's been on my shelves and DD9 for some reason has picked it up and started reading. I haven't read it yet and wondering if I need a heads-up on anything. 

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Oh we’re all just regular Maughams here.

 

The irregular Maughams must lurk elsewhere.

**

 

After recently reading other books by M.K. Eidem, I re-read her first alien romance.  It had a lot of errors in tense and suffered from a dearth of commas; however, it was enjoyable nonetheless.  (Adult content)

 

Grim (Tornians Book 1)  by M.K. Eidem

 

"King Grim Vasteri is the strongest and most feared warrior in the Tornian Empire. He is the King of Luda, blood brother to the Emperor and his line will die with him. He will have no offspring for no female would join with him for once he was scarred he was considered 'unfit'. The Tornian Empire has been dying ever since the great infection caused the birth of females to become a rarity. Since then they have been searching the known universes for compatible females. The Emperor's discovery of a compatible female on a slave ship changed that. He'd ordered Grim to find his Empress' home world so more 'unprotected' females could be obtained, knowing Grim would never be allowed to Join with one.

 

Lisa Miller is a widowed mother of two little girls, Carly and Miki. Her husband died just a year ago, after a long battle with cancer and she misses him immensely. Friends want her to start dating again but in her heart, she knows there isn't a man on the planet she could love like her Mark. Who could love their girls like their own. Therefore, she'll stay alone.

 

When Lisa is discovered 'unprotected' at her husband's grave, she wakes on an alien ship heading for an alien world. Refusing to accept this she confronts the large males, demanding she be returned to her children. Seeing his chance to have a female, Grim agrees to accept and protect her offspring, if she agrees to Join with him and only him. Realizing this is the only way she can retrieve her children Lisa agrees and the Tornian Empire changes forever."

 

Regards,

Kareni

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Good morning from Paris!

 

 

Good luck to those in the midst of moving, whether packing or unpacking. And get well, Heather and Loesje!!

Welcome to this side of the ocean!

I hope the recovering of the time difference happens soon...

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I finished Peer Gynt, read with appropriate incidental music. Very pleasing to now be able to associate the right scene with each piece of music.

 

Started Nabokov's Pale Fire, recently recommended by a Replicant interested in questions about the links between authorship, identity, and authenticity.

Edited by Violet Crown
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George Saunders' Lincoln in the Bardo just won the Booker Prize.

Ugh.  I finished this yesterday.  I don't think it's Booker-worthy.  I am quite sure it won because it's Lincoln and it's Saunders' first novel.  I know ErinE has read it, anyone else?  It read much more like a screenplay than a novel.  And there were over 100 characters.

 

OK, this is not book related but hedgehog news. I got home from my belated birthday party with friends and dh discovered I had not one but TWO hedgehogs in our back garden. Because they curl up when startled we all got a really good look at them.....I know, but the moment dh started taking the rubbish out they went into balls so we looked. How could we resist. One huge one that I think is the one I have been seeing and a smaller, lighter in colour one. The bunny's carrot peels are gone now. He will be disappointed in the morning because he knew he had them but only ate half because he is picky and hoards. ;) They are so cute! I am going to have to peel something for the bunny (hedgehogs ;) ) tomorrow. Obviously that is why they are coming here. :lol: Really no clue, suspect it's the oddly warm weather which is going to disappear any second. The neighbors all have their own theories on what hedgehogs eat and some put out offerings, meal worms, digestives, dried bananas, proper hedgehog food, to name a few. I have also been warned about fleas. :( Still happy.....

 

Jenn, have a wonderful time. I thought of your dh when walking by the stalls with the comic books last year so am thrilled he found his series there. How cool! :). The wine is good but I vote for pastries too. Not sure why but we always end up with rhubarb jam in France because it doesn't seem French. If you have a chance it's lovely on croissants.

Hedgepigs!!  So, over here across the pond, we're a bit obsessed with a British wildlife rescue show called Wildlife SOS (Netflix in case you're curious) and wow we know everything about hedgehogs and badgers, fox and screaming roe deer now.  We also love the Supervet pet orthopedics show...which can be a bit grisly.  DD is now fluent in Britsh pets and wildlife. :lol:

 

Started Nabokov's Pale Fire, recently recommended by a Replicant interested in questions about the links between authorship, identity, and authenticity.

More about the Replicants, please.  If you can tell us that is :)

 

Rose!! good luck tomorrow!  we'll be thinking of you

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Ugh.  I finished this yesterday.  I don't think it's Booker-worthy.  I am quite sure it won because it's Lincoln and it's Saunders' first novel.  I know ErinE has read it, anyone else?  It read much more like a screenplay than a novel.  And there were over 100 characters.

 

I read it, and gave it but two stars.  It was just okay for me.  And for me somehow the relentlessness of we're all gonna burn in hell and be tortured pretty much no matter what (as evidenced by the preacher's experience, not just the other characters' fears), and young scared children who die and refuse to move on in less than a day are subject to the worst tortures the afterlife has to offer... what kind of a message is that?  Sorry, that kind of spoiled it for me.  What a horrible bleak view (I know this may fit some religious views but there's a reason it isn't mine...)

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More about the Replicants, please. If you can tell us that is :)

 

You must not live with an avid Philip K. Dick fan who read all his novels multiple times, rented the movie multiple times in high school and made you watch (Harrison Ford being the only part that kept you awake), and took you out to see the sequel as soon as it hit the screens last month.

 

(Harrison Ford is still the best part.)

Edited by Violet Crown
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You must not live with an avid Philip K. Dick fan who read all his novels multiple times, rented the movie multiple times in high school and made you watch (Harrison Ford being the only part that kept you awake), and took you out to see the sequel as soon as it hit the screens last month.

 

(Harrison Ford is still the best part.)

Hubs has deigned the new movie too violent for dd13 to join us, so we're taking her to her friends' house on Thurs. night and scurrying off to the local filmhouse to see it, and I  CANNOT  WAIT 

 

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Hubs has deigned the new movie too violent for dd13 to join us, so we're taking her to her friends' house on Thurs. night and scurrying off to the local filmhouse to see it, and I CANNOT WAIT

 

You can join me for a Nabokovian Replicant Read-along!

 

ETA: Pale Fire is one of dh's Fave Books Ever, and he was giddy to see it featured in the Goslingflick. He's fetching home the original Dick novel from his office for me, too.

Edited by Violet Crown
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A one day only currently free classic for Kindle readers ~

 

The Great God Pan by Arthur Machen 

 

"A gothic masterpiece set in Victorian England: “One of the best horror stories ever written. Perhaps the best in the English language†(Stephen King).

When Mr. Clarke agrees to visit his friend Dr. Raymond, he is dubious about the proceedings he is to witness. In pursuit of what Raymond calls “transcendental science,†the doctor intends to make a small incision in a woman’s brain, allowing her to see past the world of the senses to a reality beyond imagining—a realm where, Raymond says, one can see the great god Pan. Though the experiment is an apparent failure, it will not be Clarke’s last brush with the sinister beyond.
 
Years later, Clarke hears of a woman named Helen Vaughan, who is said to be at the root of many mysterious and tragic events. From London to the Americas and back, a string of suicides and disappearances lay in the wake of this evil seductress, whom Clarke believes is not entirely of this world.
 
Upon publication in 1890, Arthur Machen’s The Great God Pan was deemed controversial for its depictions of paganism and sexual depravity. It has since been recognized as a masterwork of gothic horror."

**

 

Currently free for a limited time ~

 

Regards,

Kareni

 

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52 in 2017

 

1. I'm Judging You: The Do-Better Manual // Luvvie Ajayi
2. No-Drama Discipline // Daniel J. Siegel
3. Song of Solomon // Toni Morrison
4. Better Than Before: Mastering the Habits of Our Everyday Lives // Gretchen Rubin

5. Men We Reaped // Jesmyn Ward
6. Not Buying It: Stop Overspending and Start Raising Happier, Healthier, More Successful Kids // Brett Graff

7. Commonwealth // Ann Patchett

8. How Children Learn // John Holt

9. Born A Crime // Trevor Noah

10. The Underground Railroad // Colson Whitehead

11. The Life Changing Magic of Not Giving A F*ck // Sarah Knight

12. Upstream // Mary Oliver

13. The Handmaid's Tale // Margaret Atwood

14. Show Your Work // Austin Kleon

15. How to Raise A Wild Child // Scott D Sampson

16. A Course of Love // Alain de Botton

17. Bird by Bird // Anne Lamott

18. How to Be a Badass At Making Money // Jen Sincero

19. Long Divison // Kiese Laymon

20. Who Thought This Was A Good Idea? And other questions you should have answers to while working in the White House. // Alyssa Mastromonaco

21. The Yamas and Nayamas // Deborah Adele

22. The Dance of the Dissedent Daughter // Sue Monk Kidd

23. Still Life // Louise Penny

24. Yes Please // Amy Poehler

25. Yoga Anatomy // Leslie Kaminoff and Amy Matthews

26. You Are A Bad Ass // Jen Sincero

27. What Happened // Hillary Rodham Clinton

28. A Fatal Grace // Louise Penney

29. The Complete Guide to Yin Yoga // Bernie Clark

 

 

I’m so behind! I need to read 2 books a week at least catch up, I think I can do it. I’m currently reading Let’s Play Math and Planting Seeds. When I’m done with those I’m going to read the last 3 Laura Ingalls Wilder books, I’ve never read them, hopefully they will give me some quick wins!

 

ETA: I’m also listening to the George Saunders novel, it’s pretty good and Nick Offerman is the reader.

Edited by Runningmom80
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Ahh, now I remember how many more books were added to my TBR pile when I was active in this thread.

 

Have requested The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating from the library.

 

Enjoying the hedgehog updates.  This summer, the kids and I met a woman who is obsessed by hedgehogs - real live ones, but she also has a collection of hedgehog items - over 500 items - she was displaying them as part of a cultural exhibit on British literature (she was dressed as Mrs. Tiggywinkle).  My kids were enthralled by the hedgehogs but also enthralled by the idea that it is OK for an adult to have a huge collection of items that seemingly serve no specific purpose as long as they have a theme  - I can see where this is going to lead...

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Ugh.  I finished this yesterday.  I don't think it's Booker-worthy.  I am quite sure it won because it's Lincoln and it's Saunders' first novel.  I know ErinE has read it, anyone else?  It read much more like a screenplay than a novel.  And there were over 100 characters.

 

 

 

I read it, and gave it but two stars.  It was just okay for me.  And for me somehow the relentlessness of we're all gonna burn in hell and be tortured pretty much no matter what (as evidenced by the preacher's experience, not just the other characters' fears), and young scared children who die and refuse to move on in less than a day are subject to the worst tortures the afterlife has to offer... what kind of a message is that?  Sorry, that kind of spoiled it for me.  What a horrible bleak view (I know this may fit some religious views but there's a reason it isn't mine...)

 

 

In a way I'm glad to hear this. I probably don't have a right to critique it since I only read the sample, but what little I read plus the premise, turned me off. I always feel a bit weird when everyone in the world but me seems to love a particular book. At least I know I'm not alone. :)

Edited by Lady Florida.
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Ugh. I finished this yesterday. I don't think it's Booker-worthy. I am quite sure it won because it's Lincoln and it's Saunders' first novel. I know ErinE has read it, anyone else? It read much more like a screenplay than a novel. And there were over 100 characters.

 

I too am surprised it won the Booker Prize. It didn't feel ground breaking to me. I thought Underground Railroad was more engaging, but I haven't read anything else on the short list.

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Looking for another book recommendation to finish off a BigBingo row. ;)

 

"A Cozy Mystery set in the 1960's" - I didn't think I was going to finish this row, but it looks like I'll end up easily checking off 4/5 and so might as well finish.  I know there are a lot of mystery lovers here - any awesome suggestions?

 

 

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I am going to hear author Denise Kiernan (The Girls of Atomic City) speak tonight. She will be speaking about her new book about the Biltmore House in NC, The Last Castle: The Epic of Love, Loss, and American Royalty in America's Largest Home.

 

Cool!  I really liked The Girls of Atomic City, and I've just put her new book on my TR list - it just showed up on Overdrive.

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