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seema

how to teach -slowing down?

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DD14 (ASD, ADHD) has great difficulty slowing down when doing any academic work, be it reading or math. When we read together I am done with 1/2 page , when she has finished the page. This speeding has been causing errors, several teachers over the yrs have tried to convince her to slow down, but she is unable. This impatience is because of ADHD, unfortunately she has not tolerated any stimulants. Does anyone have any ideas to help her slow down, please.

Appreciate your help.

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DD14 (ASD, ADHD) has great difficulty slowing down when doing any academic work, be it reading or math. When we read together I am done with 1/2 page , when she has finished the page. This speeding has been causing errors, several teachers over the yrs have tried to convince her to slow down, but she is unable. This impatience is because of ADHD, unfortunately she has not tolerated any stimulants. Does anyone have any ideas to help her slow down, please.

Appreciate your help.

Most of my hundreds of remedial students I have taught over the last 23 years guess, and many of them read too fast and guess. How was she taught to read? Her WPM and scores on the MWIA 3 and the nonsense word test plus a bit about how she learned to read will help me tailor my ideas, but I do have several ideas and things that I have done with my students. The tests are at the end of my Syllables page:

 

http://www.thephonicspage.org/On%20Reading/syllablesspellsu.html

 

I would also be interested to know her grade level score on a test of single words like the 40L quick screen reading grade level test vs one with sentences like the NRRF test.

Edited by ElizabethB

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Sometimes kids are going faster to cover up a lack of control. So it could actually be an inverse thing, that she has some retained reflexes, some developmental vision problems, so it's too HARD for her to slow down and track every word and process.

 

If you found a developmental optometrist who would do a regular vision exam and just *screen* for the developmental stuff, it wouldn't cost much. Testing for retained reflexes you can do on your own with youtube if you're feeling savvy.

 

Also doing some mindfulness or the Mighteor for 20-30 minutes before the harder task would be a good way to get in her Zen mode. I would definitely feel free to up the time on the Mighteor. 30-45 minutes a day would not be excessive. It's not necessary or a hill to die on. I'm just saying it would be something to try.

 

My ds is also way more Super Zen when he runs a mile with weights the day before. It would be totally age-appropriate with a teen. Just tell her she has to do PE, take her to the track with water bottles or 2 pound weights (one for each hand) and have her run. At our Y we have an indoor track above the basketball gym, and it's 18 laps to a mile. For that, we run 2 laps, rest (do sit-ups, something light), then repeat, till we get in the mile. Last lap toss the weights and sprint. For an outdoor track around a football field, I think it's like 4-5 laps for a mile. Go by her endurance, but I would do either 1/2 lap, rest, finish the lap, rest, and so on till you complete the mile or do 1 lap, rest exercises, repeat to finish the mile.

 

Running with weights is really good sensory input and it's super, super calming for my ds. Again, costs you basically nothing. If she won't run, power walk. Running is just a thing for my ds. He loves to be FAST, so running is a thing for him. We do it in small increments like that because doing it all at once he would burn out and become dysregulated. So I'm supporting him to keep him calm while stretching him. It's not like he just magically does it, kwim? I'm giving lots of support there, watching him, making the increments small the breaks long enough that he's staying calm the whole time, not going high as a kite and stimming.

Edited by OhElizabeth

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