Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

charlotteb

Executive Functioning Skills

Recommended Posts

I just learned of this term recently, in a child trauma training class.  It has changed my viewpoint greatly. 

My youngest daughter was adopted at almost 9 years old.  She had spent all her previous years in multiple foster homes and even experienced some abuse in one :(  She was also alcohol exposed in utero.   I learned in my training that all of these factors can cause changes to the brain, especially to the area that we use for executive functioning, the ability to make plans, follow through and avoid distractions, etc.

We also have other foster children, who attend public school.  I have noticed the same lack of executive functioning skills in my daughter and the foster kids.  Long term assignments, planning, following through with plans, etc are so hard for them. 

 

Are there any programs that could help with that? or tips you could give? Is there a way to catch up or improve?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, my DS worked with a CBT that specialized in EF to help with goal setting and planning.

 

There are several books about EF on the market.  I ordered a few of the books and realized we needed the aid of a CBT instead.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gotta run but yes there are ways to help. 

 

I will try to respond more later but as a quick suggestion you might look in your local library to see if you can get hold of the books Smart but Scattered and ADD Friendly Ways to Organize Your Life for some help in understanding and assisting.  And yes, sometimes like Heathermomster said hiring a professional to do CBT type stuff can really boost things.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Following...

 

We recently gained permanent guardianship of our foster son.  He had a rough start in life as well so I have been reading and studying up on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, Reactive Attachment Disorder and childhood trauma.  

 

It's been a hard road.  And since we haven't been on it for very long, I don't feel like I know any answers.   :001_smile:

 

But blessings for taking in these hurt ones.  

 

(I like your C.S. Lewis quote.   :001_cool: )

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Executive function is one of the areas that Speech Language Pathologists diagnose and treat, so an SLP can help with this if it's actually at the level of causing disfunction in the kiddo's life.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Peg Dawson has a lot of good books on this subject. Smart but Scattered is a good overview but for a HSing parent, I really like Executive Skills in Children and Adolescents and also Coaching Students with Executive Skills Deficits.

 

Landmark School has an EF book that's on my "wish list" as I really like some of their other books. If anyone here has read it, I'd love to hear your thoughts :bigear:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a series aimed at SLPs called The Source and it has two books The Source Development of Executive Functions and The Source for Executive Function Disorders. I can't remember which one I read, but I scanned through it over two hours during one of my ds' appts, and it was EXCELLENT, probably the single best work I've ever read on EF. She may have had both books and I read one and saw the other, can't remember. Anyways, see what you think.

 

The Source® Development of Executive Functions–Second Edition

 

The Source® for Executive Function Disorders E-Book (33718E)

 

There's also some new (within the last year) EF testing an SLP can do that would give you some breakdowns on areas to work on. We had an SLP do some with ds. I think they sell it on ProEd Inc, so you can see it there.

Edited by OhElizabeth
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Like" all posts above.

 

And want to add that if you look up things about "Prefrontal Cortex" (like, "how to develop prefrontal cortex" or other words along with it that would indicate a search for things that help or harm it and its function )you are likely to come to another group of approaches to EF.  And I think some things about ADHD tend to be addressing EF as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sarah Ward is the guru you might be looking for.  Love, love her stuff.  If you can see her in person, don't miss it.  Here are some links.  The last two are found in an Autism forum but are relevant to anyone with EF challenges.  Her 360 Degree Plan (Get Ready, Do, Done) is fantastic.  The best I have seen for EF strategies.  I also really like her time management strategies.  If you google her name with "executive function" you will find many, many pdf handouts from her presentations.

 

https://www.unl.edu/asdnetwork/“job-talkâ€-developing-independent-executive-function-skills

 

https://www.unl.edu/asdnetwork/executive-functioning-skills-stop

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cognitive Connections  This is the 360 Thinking site.  They did a webinar that was $35 that was terrific, not sure if it's still available. Some of it was really practical, like how to reduce anxiety by estimating how long tasks will take, how to use a lock box for distractors, etc.

Edited by OhElizabeth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER & RECEIVE A COUPON FOR
10% OFF
We respect your privacy.You’ll hear about new products, special discounts & sales, and homeschooling tips. *Coupon only valid for first-time registrants. Coupon cannot be combined with any other offer. Entering your email address makes you eligible to receive future promotional emails.
0 Shares
Share
Tweet
Pin
×