Jump to content

Menu

Do you know if a detailed itinerary for Seattle (or any city)?


Shellydon
 Share

Recommended Posts

I am really struggling to put together 3 days in the Seattle area and our trip is fast approaching.  When traveling, I need to have a detailed hour by hour schedule in order to keep the peace and make the trip enjoyable  with no fighting among the troops.  I love Disney because of all of the detailed itineraries available online.  I cannot find anything like this for Seattle-- only vague 'visit Pikes Place Market"  type recommendations.  I need something much more concrete.  Has anyone seen anything like that?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do the Disney itineraries give detailed time schedules?  I thought it just listed what to see first at rope drop and where to go from there?

 

The difference is, you are dealing with a city, and travel times will vary depending on a variety of factors.  So, your morning Locks visit and then Pikes Place could take longer than you think and throw you off a bit due to traffic, or maybe you would like to visit the gardens while at the locks and didn't realize your family would be interested in that.  Or maybe the line at Ivars is longer than you thought, etc.....

 

Can't you just have an AM, lunch, PM, dinner plan and make it somewhat fluid?

 

You could post what you are planning to visit and those who currently live there or some of us who have lived there can help you plan.  I haven't lived there in a long time, but I do go visit every few years or so.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I suggest strongly that you take a Sightseeing Tour Bus.  They can show you more, in one day than you could see on your own in 2 or 3 days. Let them do the driving. They can get you to more places, and explain.

 

Also, TripAdvisor is THE travel web site. I googled and you might start on this URL:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attractions-g60878-Activities-Seattle_Washington.html

 

Enjoy your trip!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

if you want to see everything - take a tour bus.  you not only won't have to drive in the lovely seattle traffic, you wont' have to find parking.  (or pay exorbitant rates in some areas.)  the drawback is - you leave when they leave, and you see what they see.

 

if you want more control, map out what is where, so you can see things that are close together. that will allow you to choose what you see, have flexiblity in how long you stay where - and park once if things are in walking distance.   most places in seattle have pay parking.  (even the locks and the zoo)  the museum of flight not only has free parking - they have a lot of it.  (I highly recommend it.  1ds and I went a few weeks ago.  if anyone is interested in space, you can do the shuttle trainer - reserve ahead of time.)

 

"rush hour" is a misnomer.  unless you're driving in the wee small hours - there's traffic in seattle.  the roads go north and south - east and west is more limited.  you are dealing with the terrain of hills and bodies of water that can have a big impact on roads.

 

if you want to go outside seattle - plan on driving.  there are tour buses to Mt Rainier, and leavenworth.  they are typically day trips.   at this time of year, you will probably get some fall color as you get up into the mts.  there's even a train ride from somwhere.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

pikes place market is tourist trap central. there is a french restaurant there I love - but otherwise we avoid it.

 

eta: I would suggest finding "estimated times" for visiting a site, and using that.   for many, you could easily spend more, or less.

the locks doesn't sound exciting - but on a summer/spring busy weekend day - I can watch for a long time.  this time of year - the fish ladder at the south end of the dam should be getting some action.  (there's another one in issaquah at the hatchery)

Edited by gardenmom5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

if you want to see everything - take a tour bus.  you not only won't have to drive in the lovely seattle traffic, you wont' have to find parking.  (or pay exorbitant rates in some areas.)  the drawback is - you leave when they leave, and you see what they see.

 

if you want more control, map out what is where, so you can see things that are close together. that will allow you to choose what you see, have flexiblity in how long you stay where - and park once if things are in walking distance.   most places in seattle have pay parking.  (even the locks and the zoo)  the museum of flight not only has free parking - they have a lot of it.  (I highly recommend it.  1ds and I went a few weeks ago.  if anyone is interested in space, you can do the shuttle trainer - reserve ahead of time.)

 

"rush hour" is a misnomer.  unless you're driving in the wee small hours - there's traffic in seattle.  the roads go north and south - east and west is more limited.  you are dealing with the terrain of hills and bodies of water that can have a big impact on roads.

 

if you want to go outside seattle - plan on driving.  there are tour buses to Mt Rainier, and leavenworth.  they are typically day trips.   at this time of year, you will probably get some fall color as you get up into the mts.  there's even a train ride from somwhere.

 

While *I* would be find with a tour bus, my husband and children would run away if I even mention it! 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I  (probably) don't need any hour by hour, but a list of what to visit in what order would be a Godsend.  I just do not have time to figure out each place to go in what order.  I do not have time to map out the city, figure out where everything is and the order that is best to visit those things.   I wish my family was more 'loose' in their travel expectation, but they, especially my DH, are just not.  In order to have a good time, they need everything planned out.  I am the only one that would be content to window shop, or walk up and down streets just to look around, which are the suggestions I'm seeing online.  I think we want to see Flight Museum, Chihuly Glass, Ballard Locks, ferry to a small island, Pikes Place Market.    Thinking aloud, I should go and see if there is a book on Seattle, that might have the info I am looking for. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I (probably) don't need any hour by hour, but a list of what to visit in what order would be a Godsend. I just do not have time to figure out each place to go in what order. I do not have time to map out the city, figure out where everything is and the order that is best to visit those things. I wish my family was more 'loose' in their travel expectation, but they, especially my DH, are just not. In order to have a good time, they need everything planned out. I am the only one that would be content to window shop, or walk up and down streets just to look around, which are the suggestions I'm seeing online. I think we want to see Flight Museum, Chihuly Glass, Ballard Locks, ferry to a small island, Pikes Place Market. Thinking aloud, I should go and see if there is a book on Seattle, that might have the info I am looking for.

And Chinatown. That's interesting. Taking the metro is fun too if you aren't from a city. And the space needle. I Used a frommers guide. They have things planned out for you.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I  (probably) don't need any hour by hour, but a list of what to visit in what order would be a Godsend.  I just do not have time to figure out each place to go in what order.  I do not have time to map out the city, figure out where everything is and the order that is best to visit those things.   I wish my family was more 'loose' in their travel expectation, but they, especially my DH, are just not.  In order to have a good time, they need everything planned out.  I am the only one that would be content to window shop, or walk up and down streets just to look around, which are the suggestions I'm seeing online.  I think we want to see Flight Museum, Chihuly Glass, Ballard Locks, ferry to a small island, Pikes Place Market.    Thinking aloud, I should go and see if there is a book on Seattle, that might have the info I am looking for. 

 

 

Museum of Flight is by itself approx 15 minutes south of downtown seattle by car.  parking is easy and free -  plan on a few hours and lots of walking.  bring water bottles.  it is south of downtown seattle by boeing field - there is also a "control tower" exhibt area. they currently have an apollo exhibit which includes an unused engine bell (prepare to feel small), as well as parts of a used one recovered from the bottom of the atlantic. (bezo's project) and a bunch of Pete Conrads stuff.  (he was dyslexic? - so it includes his struggles to just learn.)   there is the main exhibit area, as well as a naval section.  then there is the airplane yard outside, that includes the "city of everett" - which was the first 747 off the line.  it was last used as a freighter, so there are no seats.  my son (aerospace engineering)  was fascinated with all the hydraulics and cables as they are exposed. a concord you can walk through, an old 707?727? air force one you can walk through.  it's now under cover so you don't get rained on - but it is open.  real shuttle trainer - make reservations ahead of time if you want to do a "mission".  you can walk through the mock-up of the cargo bay.

 

it pairs nicely with the boeing factory tour (which is in everett, about 45 minutes north of seattle. plenty of free parking.  tours are *scheduled*, though you can do a walk-in  if you are willing to wait)   - disneyland will fit inside the building  the doors are the size of a football field. the attached museum currently has the destiny science lab module mock-up/trainer from the international space station.

they will stick you in tour buses to get around - LOTS of walking.

 

chihuly glass museum is next to the space needle immediately north of downtown.  paid parking lots/garages around the area.

you can take a bus to downtown seattle - and ride the monorail to the center house  -

also pairs with the glass museum in tacoma.

 in the same area (so park and walk at the same time).

  • space needle    (if you go there for breakfast or lunch (not worth dinner) - you go up for free). if you do lunch - get a lunar orbiter for dessert
  • science center
  • EMP/museum of pop culture.   originally built to house one of  paul allen's collections.  hideously ugly building. local jokes are "the space needle took off its clothes and dumped them on the ground.
  • john nielsen's danish pastry.  2nd west immediately south of mercer.  yummy bakery. kringle (they will sell out), potatoes (choux pastry, pastry creme, marzipan, cocoa powder), or sarah bernhardts (chocolate mousse on a macaroon, covered in chocolate) are common for us.  we generally drive there on our way out, though it is walkable. street parking is hit or miss.
  • kerry park - on queen anne hill so drive. short term street parking, nice view overlooking downtown, space needle, elliott bay, Mt. Rainier

 

Ballard locks - abt 10-15 minutes north of downtown.  paid parking, hit or miss for availabilty.  weekends are busier.

you can consider lunch/dinner at ray's boathouse just further west along the water.  -very good seafood

nearby stops.   on the ridge above shilshoe/ray's/golden-gardens is. 

  •  sunset hill park  wide spot in the road, plenty of free parking, magnificent view of the olympics and puget sound

since you're driving - on the way to/from ballard - northeast and northwest end of lake union respectively. (the locks are immediately north of discovery park on the map.  just follow the water northwest from LU.)

  • time for the fremont troll under the aurora bridge.  plenty of free parking, as people don't generally stay too long.  great photo op.  it's very dirty.  yes, it's a real vw bug.   the goats are down the hill.  fremont is known for their statues. 
  • another famous one is waiting for the interurban,  locals like to dress up - worth a drive-by.  note the dog's face. it's mayor charlie royer.  the artist had a beef with him.

 

MoHI - south end of lake-union. <10 minutes NE of downtown (though mercer traffic is still a mess.)  great exhibts on the history of seattle - starting with the landing at alki.  dh will still laugh at the journal entry.  "we'll finish the cabins when it stops raining."

ride the SLUT.   someone *really* wasn't paying attention when they named it the south lake union trolley.  the acronym has stuck, even though they have changed the name to south lake union streetcar.  you can get on  downtown and ride to MOHAI..

 

pike-place-market (easy walking distance from downtown)/ waterfront.  paid parking/road construction.  or just take a bus downtown and walk.

  • washington state ferries   if you paid parking - walk-on, you can do things along the waterfront.   bremerton is a longer ferry ride, and the water park next to the dock is cool.
  • eat lunch/dinner at Ivars (about five minutes north walking).   the seafood bar is outside - throw french fries at the seagulls.  they'll remind you if you forget.  or you can eat in the restaurant.
  • kids must do:  ye olde curiosity shoppe   part tourist trap junk, part museum of the bizarre.  I adored it as a child.
  • if you're willing to walk to the north end of the waterfront - the olympic sculpture park
  • ferris wheel

 

if you want to see old growth forest (re: >250 years old) without leaving seattle - seward park.

a peninsula sticking out into lake washington, south of the I90 floating bridge.

 

 

I would really urge you to try to get to Mt. Rainier.  yes, it would be a day trip as it's about two hours each way. do some of the short hikes around longmire, and go up to paradise. there are probably tour buses you could get in seattle.

 

 

eta: added a link.

Edited by gardenmom5
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

we did a school tilicum village trip a few years ago.  it's on blake island, which is a state park.  the salmon was average.  the indian show was educational.  the boat has much more freedom than a WA state ferry - so when an orca pod was just south of its normal route returning, we diverted to go see the orcas.  there are three resident pods in puget sound.

 

eta: it's an argosy cruise - so it leaves from the waterfront.

Edited by gardenmom5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Museum of Flight is by itself approx 15 minutes south of downtown seattle by car.  parking is easy and free -  plan on a few hours and lots of walking.  bring water bottles.  it is south of downtown seattle by boeing field - there is also a "control tower" exhibt area. they currently have an apollo exhibit which includes an unused engine bell (prepare to feel small), as well as parts of a used one recovered from the bottom of the atlantic. (bezo's project) and a bunch of Pete Conrads stuff.  (he was dyslexic? - so it includes his struggles to just learn.)   there is the main exhibit area, as well as a naval section.  then there is the airplane yard outside, that includes the "city of everett" - which was the first 747 off the line.  it was last used as a freighter, so there are no seats.  my son (aerospace engineering)  was fascinated with all the hydraulics and cables as they are exposed. a concord you can walk through, an old 707?727? air force one you can walk through.  it's now under cover so you don't get rained on - but it is open.  real shuttle trainer - make reservations ahead of time if you want to do a "mission".  you can walk through the mock-up of the cargo bay.

 

it pairs nicely with the boeing factory tour (which is in everett, about 45 minutes north of seattle. plenty of free parking.  tours are *scheduled*, though you can do a walk-in  if you are willing to wait)   - disneyland will fit inside the building  the doors are the size of a football field. the attached museum currently has the destiny science lab module mock-up/trainer from the international space station.

they will stick you in tour buses to get around - LOTS of walking.

 

chihuly glass museum is next to the space needle immediately north of downtown.  paid parking lots/garages around the area.

you can take a bus to downtown seattle - and ride the monorail to the center house  -

also pairs with the glass museum in tacoma.

 in the same area (so park and walk at the same time).

  • space needle    (if you go there for breakfast or lunch (not worth dinner) - you go up for free). if you do lunch - get a lunar orbiter for dessert
  • science center
  • EMP/museum of pop culture.   originally built to house one of  paul allen's collections.  hideously ugly building. local jokes are "the space needle took off its clothes and dumped them on the ground.
  • john nielsen's danish pastry.  2nd west immediately south of mercer.  yummy bakery. kringle (they will sell out), potatoes (choux pastry, pastry creme, marzipan, cocoa powder), or sarah bernhardts (chocolate mousse on a macaroon, covered in chocolate) are common for us.  we generally drive there on our way out, though it is walkable. street parking is hit or miss.
  • kerry park - on queen anne hill so drive. short term street parking, nice view overlooking downtown, space needle, elliott bay, Mt. Rainier

 

Ballard locks - abt 10-15 minutes north of downtown.  paid parking, hit or miss for availabilty.  weekends are busier.

you can consider lunch/dinner at ray's boathouse just further west along the water.  -very good seafood

nearby stops.   on the ridge above shilshoe/ray's/golden-gardens is. 

  •  sunset hill park  wide spot in the road, plenty of free parking, magnificent view of the olympics and puget sound

since you're driving - on the way to/from ballard - northeast and northwest end of lake union respectively. (the locks are immediately north of discovery park on the map.  just follow the water northwest from LU.)

  • time for the fremont troll under the aurora bridge.  plenty of free parking, as people don't generally stay too long.  great photo op.  it's very dirty.  yes, it's a real vw bug.   the goats are down the hill.  fremont is known for their statues. 
  • another famous one is waiting for the interurban,  locals like to dress up - worth a drive-by.  note the dog's face. it's mayor charlie royer.  the artist had a beef with him.

 

MoHI - south end of lake-union. <10 minutes NE of downtown (though mercer traffic is still a mess.)  great exhibts on the history of seattle - starting with the landing at alki.  dh will still laugh at the journal entry.  "we'll finish the cabins when it stops raining."

ride the SLUT.   someone *really* wasn't paying attention when they named it the south lake union trolley.  the acronym has stuck, even though they have changed the name to south lake union streetcar.  you can get on  downtown and ride to MOHAI..

 

pike-place-market (easy walking distance from downtown)/ waterfront.  paid parking/road construction.  or just take a bus downtown and walk.

  • washington state ferries   if you paid parking - walk-on, you can do things along the waterfront.   bremerton is a longer ferry ride, and the water park next to the dock is cool.
  • eat lunch/dinner at Ivars (about five minutes north walking).   the seafood bar is outside - throw french fries at the seagulls.  they'll remind you if you forget.  or you can eat in the restaurant.
  • kids must do:  ye olde curiosity shoppe   part tourist trap junk, part museum of the bizarre.  I adored it as a child.
  • if you're willing to walk to the north end of the waterfront - the olympic sculpture park
  • ferris wheel

 

if you want to see old growth forest (re: >250 years old) without leaving seattle - seward park.

a peninsula sticking out into lake washington, south of the I90 floating bridge.

 

 

I would really urge you to try to get to Mt. Rainier.  yes, it would be a day trip as it's about two hours each way. do some of the short hikes around longmire, and go up to paradise. there are probably tour buses you could get in seattle.

 

 

eta: added a link.

 

Bless you, seriously.  I've haven't slept through the night in nearly 3 months, am dealing with a kid with anxiety and an elder care situation with dementia and this trip was just my breaking point.  I am printing this out and having the teenager help me route everything.  Again, I think you just saved my sanity.

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bless you, seriously.  I've haven't slept through the night in nearly 3 months, am dealing with a kid with anxiety and an elder care situation with dementia and this trip was just my breaking point.  I am printing this out and having the teenager help me route everything.  Again, I think you just saved my sanity.

 

 

let me know if there is anything else you want to see? 

what do your kids like?

what would YOU like?

 

you could do the ferry to bainbridge island (same waterfront dock) - it is shorter for time.  and walking distance the other side is shops and restaurants.  not my style.  or you could just turn around.  you're required to get off while they check the boat, then they allow everyone back on.   east bound is free for passengers.

 

I always took my kids to the science center because I loved it as a kid.  1ds included that on his application essay for his aerospace engineering program.

 

the aquarium is also on the waterfront - but that could easily take an entire afternoon.

 

archie mcphee's is just north of the aurora bridge (re: troll).   you could easily substitute it for ye olde curiosity shoppe.  it's reported to be the best place to buy a rubber chicken.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

pikes place market is tourist trap central. there is a french restaurant there I love - but otherwise we avoid it.

 

eta: I would suggest finding "estimated times" for visiting a site, and using that.   for many, you could easily spend more, or less.

the locks doesn't sound exciting - but on a summer/spring busy weekend day - I can watch for a long time.  this time of year - the fish ladder at the south end of the dam should be getting some action.  (there's another one in issaquah at the hatchery)

 

There is a reason it is a "tourist trap."  I love PP and I even loved it when I lived in Seattle.  Market Spice tea is a must buy every visit, and across the street is a great place to grab some Malaysian lunch to go and then go sit outside watching the ships.

 

I got the best purses ever from PP and kept going back to buy more.  They were pre-treated excellent quality soft leather that didn't get ruined in the rain.  Last time I went, she wasn't there and so I found her number and called her.  She said she wasn't there as often anymore because of arthritis and she was considering retiring completely.  I haven't followed up since but am now curious.  My bag from 30 years ago is still in good condition!   Honestly, I would take one of her bags over Coach or a name brand any day!

 

Sorry, got off on a tangent there.  

 

OP, my .02.  Don't skip Pike Place!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

well, you could spend a day exploring.  Start at the Seattle Center.  The MoPop museum is there, Children's museum, Science center, glass museum.  Take the monorail to westlake.  Walk to Pike Market(it's not a bad walk).  Walk the market as long as you want.  Get to waterfront(I'd suggest a bus or taxi b/c the walk back uphill is brutal) and do the waterfront area.  Aquarium, harbor boat ride with Argosy or the sailboat people.  Or just take a ferry across and back.  Eat on the waterfront.  Get back to west to take monorail back to seattle center.  Probably a game or event that night.  Eat.  Let kids play on massive playground there(my kids are teens and love this place).  More than enough for 1 day.  Oh, do the space needle at night if it is clear.  Otherwise do back in the earlier part of the day when at the seattle center. 

 

what else do you want to see in the area?  Boeing tour in everett is super cool.  Driving to St Helens or Ranier is a day trip.  

 

Drive north to Anacortes and then over Deception Pass. Go into State park there and walk on the water/hike.  Drive Whidbey Island and take ferry back over to mainland area.  

 

I agree, knowing what you want to see would help.  There is a city pass for the main attractions and you could just do those at your own pace.  They offer the Ducks ride around town but they had the tragic accident a few years ago...I might skip that for now.  

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  My bag from 30 years ago is still in good condition!   Honestly, I would take one of her bags over Coach or a name brand any day!

 

 

 

today's coach bags aren't what they were 40 years ago. 

My mother's aunt would hand down her cast off's (then she moved up to chanel)

 

I still have some - they are very thick and sturdy leather.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thinking about aquarium: it's got great info on PNW, but it's not that great of an aquarium in my opinion. If you have one near you've gone to I wouldn't bother. I only had a baby with me when I went, so he was free, but I would have been sort of irritated to spend all that money to go there if I had to pay for two adults plus kids.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thinking about aquarium: it's got great info on PNW, but it's not that great of an aquarium in my opinion. If you have one near you've gone to I wouldn't bother. I only had a baby with me when I went, so he was free, but I would have been sort of irritated to spend all that money to go there if I had to pay for two adults plus kids.

 

...Interesting. The aquarium is one of the Must See things we want to do when we go back to the Seattle area next Summer.

 

Mt St Helens, visiting friends, and the aquarium are the only things on the list so far

 

And that is even with probably going to the Dallas Aquarium this weekend.  The Seattle aquarium strikes me as better.

 

Edited by vonfirmath
Link to comment
Share on other sites

...Interesting. The aquarium is one of the Must See things we want to do when we go back to the Seattle area next Summer.

 

Mt St Helens, visiting friends, and the aquarium are the only things on the list so far

 

And that is even with probably going to the Dallas Aquarium this weekend. The Seattle aquarium strikes me as better.

Well, I compare all aquariums to the Chicago aquarium :). And it was something like eighteen dollars per person, or at least adult. Aquariums are expensive, I get that.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...