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Are there safe supplements that increase pulse?


creekland
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Just checking with the Hive due to all the info and experiences on here coupled with not much internet time to check with google right now.

 

Are there safe supplements that increase pulse without causing one to stay awake?

 

I'm essentially playing around to try to fix things again.  If it works, it will help out a bit.  If not, no big deal and at least I tried.

 

At home I can usually go out and exercise to improve things.  When visiting parents, that's just not possible to the level I need.  Ditto on long plane flights or car rides.

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Caffeine is the only thing I can think of that may help. What does your doctor recommend? Though I would be very leery to take a non-prescribed supplement that may affect the heart. There are prescription medications that will increase the blood pressure so I would presume it would have a similar effect on heart rate. Is there a particular reason that you need the rate to be increased? 

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I don't know about supplements, but there is a thing called Chair Aerobics that will get your heartrate up.

 

That would work at home if I needed it, but not in company with others.  Thanks for the thought though.

 

Strong coffee?

 

I use caffeine (not coffee - can't stand that beverage) to stay awake when needed, but if I took in the afternoon or evening I'd have a tough time sleeping otherwise.  

 

Caffeine is the only thing I can think of that may help. What does your doctor recommend? Though I would be very leery to take a non-prescribed supplement that may affect the heart. There are prescription medications that will increase the blood pressure so I would presume it would have a similar effect on heart rate. Is there a particular reason that you need the rate to be increased? 

 

Doctors don't think this is a (real) problem for me.  They feel it is due to stress and have offered anti-anxiety meds.  No one in my family or IRL circle of friends agrees with them that stress/anxiety is an issue and I certainly don't feel that way (might consider it if others begged to differ), so I'm on my own to live with it or see if I can do anything to change it.

 

I'm curious why you need to increase it? A slow pulse rate is generally considered a good thing.

 

I don't know if changing it would fix anything or not.  It's just something I wondered if I could try last night when my pulse was down into the 50s again on a bad day.  

 

In general, whenever I'm still (not moving) my extremity nerves feel like they are falling asleep except there's never the pins and needles feeling once I move, so it's likely just nerve issues and not blood flow issues.  The more I stay still, the more it builds.  At home I simply get up and move to stop it.  I stay in motion - not a gym or anything (doubt I have the lung capacity for that as two flights of stairs cause deeper breathing and by five flights I need to take a pause to continue).  It's just regular activity.  On my phone a typical step count is between 5K and 11k.  The most I'm still is for an hour or two and I'm used to just putting up with that level.  Mornings are the worst because of being still overnight (just turning over or getting up to use the bathroom is not enough movement to fix it for more than seconds).  Still, it's solvable simply by getting up.

 

That's all normal - what I deal with all the time.

 

When I travel to visit parents I don't get to be active - and it builds, and builds.  A typical step count is between 1k and 3K.  That's not enough to stop the pain buildup.  I get breaks when I am moving, but that's it.  I can handle a day or two ok, but I'm now on DAY 5 with more to come.

 

Last night as I was trying to fall asleep with a typical morning level of pain (causing me to want to get up), I was trying to brainstorm a solution.  My pulse at the time was in the 50s (I can hear this all the time if there's no other noise so it's obvious to me when it's slower or faster).  It's usually in the 60s or higher at home - up easily into the 100 - 120+ rate when I'm doing chores.  I don't get that here.  Ever. It made me wonder if there were a way to increase the pulse/blood flow and if that somehow managed to decrease the (likely) inflammation bugging the nerves - just having it faster for a time period as with being active.  I don't know.  I just thought it'd be worth a try to see.  The worst that would happen is it doesn't work.

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Have you been evaluated for Restless Leg Syndrome?  (it doesn't just affect the legs)  Vitamin D, iron tablets and b12 are often suggested if you blood levels are in the low range.  Even if they are not off the charts low, some people just need a bit higher level.  My PCP said my levels were fine, but my neurologist thought otherwise.  He had me supplement (based on blood work) and my symptoms went away very quick.  I loved that we found the cause of the symptoms, not just treating it with medications. I was at the doctor because I couldn't sleep, and had no idea RLS was the cause of it. I didn't realize I was having symptoms, because I was so used to them. LOL It wasn't until they went away and then came back (I stopped my meds) that I realized how annoying the constant feeling of needing to move was. 

 

I know a lot of people take various meds for RLS and other neurological pain conditions. A common one is Gabapentin. If you are that uncomfortable, I would definitely see a doctor for it. 

 

My blood pressure runs low, so I purposefully eat extra salt and caffeine. It was what my doctor ordered. LOL If it gets too low, I feel like I am walking through water and get so tired.  I make sure to have caffiene between 12-3 every day.  It will help me last until night, but not affect my sleep. 

 

Just squeezing your muscles and crossing your legs can affect your heart rate, so you may try that to see if you can get a bump when you need it. Maybe try some butt, thigh, arm, ab clenching when you are sedentary. lol

 

 

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My pulse and blood pressure are also low, salt and caffeine.

 

If exercise seems to help, is there a reason you can't there? Can you do a bit in your room or the bathroom? With long car rides, you can stop more often and walk around a bit.

 

If you talk to the stewardesses you may be able to explain and walk around a bit on the plane without suspicion, or just pretend to go to the bathroom a lot, LOL.

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Have you been evaluated for Restless Leg Syndrome?  (it doesn't just affect the legs)  Vitamin D, iron tablets and b12 are often suggested if you blood levels are in the low range.  Even if they are not off the charts low, some people just need a bit higher level.  My PCP said my levels were fine, but my neurologist thought otherwise.  He had me supplement (based on blood work) and my symptoms went away very quick.  I loved that we found the cause of the symptoms, not just treating it with medications. I was at the doctor because I couldn't sleep, and had no idea RLS was the cause of it. I didn't realize I was having symptoms, because I was so used to them. LOL It wasn't until they went away and then came back (I stopped my meds) that I realized how annoying the constant feeling of needing to move was. 

 

I know a lot of people take various meds for RLS and other neurological pain conditions. A common one is Gabapentin. If you are that uncomfortable, I would definitely see a doctor for it. 

 

My blood pressure runs low, so I purposefully eat extra salt and caffeine. It was what my doctor ordered. LOL If it gets too low, I feel like I am walking through water and get so tired.  I make sure to have caffiene between 12-3 every day.  It will help me last until night, but not affect my sleep. 

 

Just squeezing your muscles and crossing your legs can affect your heart rate, so you may try that to see if you can get a bump when you need it. Maybe try some butt, thigh, arm, ab clenching when you are sedentary. lol

 

It might be related to something like that, but there's certainly no jerking movements nor does it keep me awake at night (normally).  It just causes me to get up when I wake up in the morning rather than lounging in bed.

 

I know iron doesn't work.  It has a major negative effect on my body. I've switched to a lower iron diet in order to try to keep those effects better.  Blood tests are normal for it anyway.

 

Gabepentin is something I have at home on my counter.  They said it could help, but the side effects it comes with (fatigue and mental issues potentially leading to suicide) aren't more attractive to me.  I'm not tired/fatigued now.  I don't care to be.  My "belief" is when life is not worth living, I'm totally ok taking myself out.  However, I want to be of sound mind when that happens.  I don't need extra gremlins in my mind giving me suggestions.  It's too risky.

 

I definitely add salt and lower liquids.  Those already help - or rather - if I don't do them, it has a major negative effect too, but mainly to head pain.  I haven't noticed a difference with the other stuff.

 

Caffeine is part of my morning and lunch routine (green tea in the morning, a soda at lunch, so not tons).  I don't know that I want to add more, but maybe.  It would be easier to do if I liked tea better - or coffee!  I don't really want to add more soda.

 

Clenching muscles works very briefly.  It won't stop any sort of daily build up.  It's useful in the moment though - as are any other movements.

 

My pulse and blood pressure are also low, salt and caffeine.

 

If exercise seems to help, is there a reason you can't there? Can you do a bit in your room or the bathroom? With long car rides, you can stop more often and walk around a bit.

 

If you talk to the stewardesses you may be able to explain and walk around a bit on the plane without suspicion, or just pretend to go to the bathroom a lot, LOL.

 

It's mainly a social thing when we're with other people.  At my mom's I can sometimes go out for a walk, but not all the time.  At my in-laws walks are non-existent, unless it's from the chair to the table or car.  Those are the days when step counts get to about 400-800 for the whole day.  I do more than that with basic morning chores at home or just getting to a classroom at school.

 

I'm not really worried about plane trips (though the 12 1/2 hour one will be interesting).  Getting through a sedentary day or two is something I've learned to live with.  I was just wondering if there might be a solution for longer visits with little exercise.  I gain weight on these visits too (lack of normal exercise for sure).  It'd be nice to see if my metabolism could be boosted higher to eliminate that too - but eh - just brainstorming.

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Am I understanding correctly: the reason you want to increase your heart rate is that you wonder if having your heart rate low contributes to inflammation and therefore to pain? 

 

Just a brainstorm, but yes.  I was wondering if they could be connected since it's a major difference between my normal life and "visiting" life.  At home it rises naturally due to doing things.  It can still get down to the 50s in the evening (no difference there), but it was much higher at other times during the day when I was active.  Could it help things be better on it's own (due to more vascular activity) or does it require the actual physical exercise.  That was/is my question.

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That would work at home if I needed it, but not in company with others. Thanks for the thought though.

 

 

I use caffeine (not coffee - can't stand that beverage) to stay awake when needed, but if I took in the afternoon or evening I'd have a tough time sleeping otherwise.

 

 

Doctors don't think this is a (real) problem for me. They feel it is due to stress and have offered anti-anxiety meds. No one in my family or IRL circle of friends agrees with them that stress/anxiety is an issue and I certainly don't feel that way (might consider it if others begged to differ), so I'm on my own to live with it or see if I can do anything to change it.

 

 

I don't know if changing it would fix anything or not. It's just something I wondered if I could try last night when my pulse was down into the 50s again on a bad day.

 

In general, whenever I'm still (not moving) my extremity nerves feel like they are falling asleep except there's never the pins and needles feeling once I move, so it's likely just nerve issues and not blood flow issues. The more I stay still, the more it builds. At home I simply get up and move to stop it. I stay in motion - not a gym or anything (doubt I have the lung capacity for that as two flights of stairs cause deeper breathing and by five flights I need to take a pause to continue). It's just regular activity. On my phone a typical step count is between 5K and 11k. The most I'm still is for an hour or two and I'm used to just putting up with that level. Mornings are the worst because of being still overnight (just turning over or getting up to use the bathroom is not enough movement to fix it for more than seconds). Still, it's solvable simply by getting up.

 

That's all normal - what I deal with all the time.

 

When I travel to visit parents I don't get to be active - and it builds, and builds. A typical step count is between 1k and 3K. That's not enough to stop the pain buildup. I get breaks when I am moving, but that's it. I can handle a day or two ok, but I'm now on DAY 5 with more to come.

 

Last night as I was trying to fall asleep with a typical morning level of pain (causing me to want to get up), I was trying to brainstorm a solution. My pulse at the time was in the 50s (I can hear this all the time if there's no other noise so it's obvious to me when it's slower or faster). It's usually in the 60s or higher at home - up easily into the 100 - 120+ rate when I'm doing chores. I don't get that here. Ever. It made me wonder if there were a way to increase the pulse/blood flow and if that somehow managed to decrease the (likely) inflammation bugging the nerves - just having it faster for a time period as with being active. I don't know. I just thought it'd be worth a try to see. The worst that would happen is it doesn't work.

I haven't read the responses yet, apologies. I'm a nurse so excuse my bluntness, but if you have an eating disorder, please get some help for it. If I'm wrong about that, then I'd suspect low B12 levels from your symptoms, and start supplementing tomorrow. B12 is cheap and easy to take, tiny pills.
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S

snip

 

It might be related to something like that, but there's certainly no jerking movements nor does it keep me awake at night (normally).  It just causes me to get up when I wake up in the morning rather than lounging in bed.

 

 

snip

 

I don't jerk either.  What I find I do, is move my feet, ankles, legs more that other people. They just feel uncomfortable if I don't move them periodically. I used to attribute it to having a job that keeps me on my feet.  I figured it was just my body being used to the movement.  Then I started the B12 and iron.  I know you said you can't do iron, but maybe consider B12.  It is water soluble vitamin, so you can take normal doses very safely.  My neurologist suggested sublingual, either cyanocobalamin methylated methylcobalamin. 1-3000 mg daily (Blood tests showed mine was low)  It really makes a huge difference for me in being able to sit still. (my sleep was bad because I move all the time). When my level gets really low, I notice I push my feet against things absentmindedly. LIke when I sit on the couch, I will be pushing my foot against the cushion or on the floor. 

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Creekland, I cam't tell from your post whether you've tried gabapentin and had side effects or if you're afraid to try it due to potential side effects. FWIW -- My mother was on it for many years. It did wonders for her with no discernible negative side effects at all.

 

I don't readily dismiss the potential for side effects from any medication, but . . if many people read the ones for aspirin they'd be way too afraid to even take even a very common drug like that.

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B12 is easy to try and low b12 can show itself in lots of ways!

On your sedentary days, can you walk in place? Or do you have to be sitting? I have a mini trampoline that I like to walk on when I'm walking in place.

My DS has lower blood pressure and a slow heart rate. He has to stay VERY hydrated. Lots of water and lots of salt.

A slower heart rate can also be a hypothyroid symptom.

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I haven't read the responses yet, apologies. I'm a nurse so excuse my bluntness, but if you have an eating disorder, please get some help for it. If I'm wrong about that, then I'd suspect low B12 levels from your symptoms, and start supplementing tomorrow. B12 is cheap and easy to take, tiny pills.

 

Well, no "typical" eating disorder, but post radiation I've never gotten hungry.  I can easily go 24 hours without getting hungry at least, possibly more, but I haven't tested it.  Since this started I literally can't eat much.  I can choose to eat pretty lightly for 2-3 meals or I can eat one regular full size meal per day, but not more (too full).  Often I skip a meal.  At the very least my digestive system is slow, but again, I'm told (by three doctors now) this all isn't a problem since I'm not losing weight.  No tests.  It's just all attributed to the radiation (except by the radiation doctor who says it shouldn't be, but it's out of his specialty so his part ends there).  My metabolism has adjusted to eating little with decent exercise.  When I can't get the exercise, I gain weight quickly (pound per day or so).  At home it comes back off.

 

All that said, the nerve issues predate radiation (hearing my pulse does not), so they're unlikely to be related.

 

But... with the B12 recommendations... can't hurt to give it a try and see what happens.  If it helps, great.  If not, it didn't cost much to try.

 

S

I don't jerk either.  What I find I do, is move my feet, ankles, legs more that other people. They just feel uncomfortable if I don't move them periodically. I used to attribute it to having a job that keeps me on my feet.  I figured it was just my body being used to the movement.  Then I started the B12 and iron.  I know you said you can't do iron, but maybe consider B12.  It is water soluble vitamin, so you can take normal doses very safely.  My neurologist suggested sublingual, either cyanocobalamin methylated methylcobalamin. 1-3000 mg daily (Blood tests showed mine was low)  It really makes a huge difference for me in being able to sit still. (my sleep was bad because I move all the time). When my level gets really low, I notice I push my feet against things absentmindedly. LIke when I sit on the couch, I will be pushing my foot against the cushion or on the floor. 

 

Interesting.  B12 sounds worth a try.  Thanks for the specifics.

 

Creekland, I cam't tell from your post whether you've tried gabapentin and had side effects or if you're afraid to try it due to potential side effects. FWIW -- My mother was on it for many years. It did wonders for her with no discernible negative side effects at all.

 

I don't readily dismiss the potential for side effects from any medication, but . . if many people read the ones for aspirin they'd be way too afraid to even take even a very common drug like that.

 

I have not tried it.  There's a co-worker at school who is on it and is tired all the time.  He can't tell that it significantly helps either, but his issue is different.  I don't care to exchange what I have (that I've learned to live with) for something I don't that would negatively affect my life.  And TBH, the suicide warning does yell a warning at me.  I know how I feel on bad days (NOT from this issue - this is not the worst thing I deal with - this is more of an annoyance), and I just don't want to play with the possibility of gremlins influencing my mind on those days.  It's not worth the risk.  B12 could be worth trying though.

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B12 is easy to try and low b12 can show itself in lots of ways!

On your sedentary days, can you walk in place? Or do you have to be sitting? I have a mini trampoline that I like to walk on when I'm walking in place.

My DS has lower blood pressure and a slow heart rate. He has to stay VERY hydrated. Lots of water and lots of salt.

A slower heart rate can also be a hypothyroid symptom.

 

If I want to not cause waves, I have to be sitting (often playing games, on the computer, traveling, or watching TV).

 

I tried staying hydrated.  That was horrible for my head (massive headaches that wouldn't go away with ibuprofen or acetaminophen).

 

Thyroid has been extensively tested and is kept up bi-annually with testing (due to the radiation in my past and the doctors figuring it would go).  It's fine.  :D   My body seems to get a kick out of being unusual with what happens.  It's genetic though.  My mom is the same way.  It's nice when all the "supposed to" things don't happen (from morning sickness on), but a bear to figure out what's going on when something does happen.  Then add in the brain tumor.  All docs since have found that to be a great excuse to blame things on - even though the actual docs who dealt with the cancer say no.  They just say those docs are wrong.  How about some anti-anxiety meds?

 

It honestly is just easier to figure out how to live with things, esp since I'm ok with not making it into my 60s, 70s, or 80s should quality of life not be there.

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I think a cardiology visit wouldn't be a bad idea. If the radiation was to the chest, you really should have an echo, although I"m thinking you didn't since you mention brain tumor. Certain chemotherapy agents can cause heart problems as well. Another easy test is a halter monitor or Zio patch to check your heart rhythm and rate. 

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I think a cardiology visit wouldn't be a bad idea. If the radiation was to the chest, you really should have an echo, although I"m thinking you didn't since you mention brain tumor. Certain chemotherapy agents can cause heart problems as well. Another easy test is a halter monitor or Zio patch to check your heart rhythm and rate. 

 

No chemo - benign brain tumor, but not near areas that should affect other things.

 

In an (my?) ideal world "big picture," someone would check everything out for peace of mind if nothing else.  A friend/co-worker has that with her cancer dr.  It seems quite nice to have someone watching out over everything.  However, she's checked with him and unless I get breast cancer, I can't be one of his patients.

 

In my situation I started with a vision issue and the nerve issues.  I opted to have the vision issue checked out first.  That turned up the tumor and I mistakenly thought it was responsible for the rest too - until I asked about it and was told (by the tumor doc) that it's not related.  A neurologist found carpal tunnel (now fixed) but nothing else.

 

Since radiation (3+ years ago now) other stuff has come up (hearing pulse, lack of hunger, trigiminal nerve numbness all being constant) and occasionally new things continue to come up (painful underarm lumps on one side, painful neck lumps, decreasing lung capacity - possibly more, but those come to mind). 

 

The underarm lumps got checked via an ultrasound scan and I'm told "they're nothing - they've always been there."  They haven't.  Hubby confirms they haven't.  One painful day they arrived and stuck around. But what else can a minion do?  Nothing shows up on the scan, so... even though others can feel them, they're fine. 

 

I was sent to two ENTs over the trigiminal nerve stuff even though there's no real reason to expect an ear issue (MRI is fine, no hearing loss or balance issues).  That's where that ends.

 

The lung capacity issues could be related to asthma I supposedly have according to Navy docs who "found" it back when I was in the AF.  No doctor has heard it since, nor have there been any attacks beyond the one on an official run that caused it to be tested, but again, what's a minion to do?  It ended my AF career.  They told me as I aged lung capacity would decrease.  I'm aging.  The phantom asthma could be the cause.  It would fit their prediction, so that one could quite possibly be its own thing entirely.

 

The rest?  I'm a very pro-science person and believe everything has a cause.  Based upon some research other boardies did, it seems quite possible to be vascular (but not necessarily cardiac) - mostly resting on hearing my pulse and the fact that I had a fatty tissue lump on my finger removed that had blood vessels unexpectedly growing all around it (causing it to look weird - and dangerous - even though it wasn't).  IF that sort of stuff is happening elsewhere in my body, it could (to me) explain pretty much everything - pressure on nerves, feeling better a little on the dehydrated side or a day or two after donating blood, other lumps under my arm, neck, whatever.  I asked two different doctors if that could be checked out and was told no.  It's just stress and related to radiation.  No tests for their judgment, just their best guess.

 

IF my own guess (just a guess) is correct, google tells me 80% of the time it will just be part of life, 10% of the time it seems to fix itself (the odds I'm hoping for), and 10% of the time it ends up with a stroke (if that happens, it darn well better be fatal).  If they are right and it's just radiation, then I have to live with it anyway, so such is the lot I have for my life - just taking each new thing (or old thing) as it comes along and figuring out how to best live with it all.

 

Since my mom's diagnosis of cancer (terminal - esophageal that has spread to her liver and more, but was all "stress" too according to her doctor until she literally almost died) I have found myself wondering if that could be the common denominator of all the more recent things.  But... the underarm lumps seem to not be it and I'm not dead yet (a couple years after that one came about), so it's probably not.  If it is, I'm thinking I'd rather not know at this point.  It will have spread to all those locations (or at least some of them) and I'd be pissed at not having been taken seriously.  I'm not likely to do any treatment for it at the stage it'd be at, so I'd rather just live not knowing and let the end come when it does.

 

There is no doctor I've seen who is willing to check out more than the most common things.  I tried a local doctor first, then switched to one in Johns Hopkins system thinking it might be better, but found no real difference other than JH costs more and is a billing nightmare.  Such is my real world.  I used to get miffed, but TBH, I don't blame them.  They've probably never seen uncommon things, they don't know me personally to know my personality, and I know seeing stress types of things is pretty usual - then couple all of that with having very little time to make their judgment due to our medical system.  At this point I'm back "in" with a local doctor, but I plan to only see her if something is pretty darn obvious and can be fixed (stitches or whatever).  I don't do well mentally not being believed or in control of my own destiny.

 

I'll admit to saving one bit of hope for middle son as he's in med school.  He knows me and the whole situation.  As he learns more and gains contacts (for me to see), perhaps something will help.  Who knows?  He's told me he plans to do what he can.

 

And at this point I'm kept busy enough with my mom's end and my in-laws issues so there's no time for me to even think about myself - except for the occasional brainstorm. ;)

 

Fortunately today we did a bit of yard work on mom's yard.  That definitely helped motion-wise!  Yesterday I walked around Lowes a bit rather than just getting what we needed and heading back home immediately - that worked too.

 

Sooner or later I'll get to a store and pick up some B12.  Shouldn't hurt, might help.

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1. I wonder if it could be a matter of lymph flow rather than heart rate.  The movement might be helping lymph to flow, and also happens to raise your heart rate as a side effect.  Which isn't very helpful, since there isn't a subtle way to move lymph around other than moving or doing something like a massage.  Just something that crossed my mind.

 

2.  Don't people use self-hypnosis to lower their heart rates?  Couldn't it be used to raise a heart rate?  Sorry if that's too woo-woo a suggestion.

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1. I wonder if it could be a matter of lymph flow rather than heart rate.  The movement might be helping lymph to flow, and also happens to raise your heart rate as a side effect.  Which isn't very helpful, since there isn't a subtle way to move lymph around other than moving or doing something like a massage.  Just something that crossed my mind.

 

2.  Don't people use self-hypnosis to lower their heart rates?  Couldn't it be used to raise a heart rate?  Sorry if that's too woo-woo a suggestion.

 

I've wondered if it's a lymph issue at times too - esp with pain in the neck being one of the newer(ish) things to come on.  I've no way to prove or disprove that one either as far as I know.

 

And lately, I've become less wary of woo-woo anything.  So what if it's a placebo effect, if it works, it works.  I just need to find the right placebo.

 

Once I figured out adding iron made things super worse I was pretty hopeful that decreasing iron would fix more than it did, but it just got rid of the effects from adding it - a significant plus, but not the Golden Ticket.

 

Still, the constant stuff I'm used to and it only bugs me when I'm in a bad mood.  The variable stuff on bad days is a completely different story as are new things when they come.

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Just a brainstorm, but yes.  I was wondering if they could be connected since it's a major difference between my normal life and "visiting" life.  At home it rises naturally due to doing things.  It can still get down to the 50s in the evening (no difference there), but it was much higher at other times during the day when I was active.  Could it help things be better on it's own (due to more vascular activity) or does it require the actual physical exercise.  That was/is my question.

 

 

Am I understanding correctly: the reason you want to increase your heart rate is that you wonder if having your heart rate low contributes to inflammation and therefore to pain? 

 

Ok. I wanted to be sure that I was understanding. I think your suspicion that the pain is related to inflammation is probably correct. Exercise directly impacts both of those. It is not merely the rise of pulse rate but the whole cascade of chemical reactions that happen when you exercise. I think it is unlikely that pulse is directly relevant. If there is absolutely no way to sneak in any exercise, I would make sure that you are not eating foods that would tend to cause inflammation and that you are eating lots of fruits and veges to tamp it down. Tart cherry juice or dried tart cherries are very good for inflammation if you want a quick fix. When I am traveling visiting relatives though, I find exercise much more socially acceptable/ easier to grab than avoiding a lot of foods I don't eat at home. I travel frequently, driving for 8 hours, to visit an aging relative. I have found things I can do exercise-wise but don't know your situation. 

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I can't help with any long term solutions, but for the next couple of days (or however long your trip is), can you sneak in some extra movement? Every time you need to go to the bathroom, jog in place in there for a few minutes before coming back out to the family. Find a couple of excuses to "get something" from your room and do the same. Volunteer to run to the grocery store and do a lap around the store before heading in. That kind of thing? 

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When you are at home, a mini trampoline can help with lymph drainage.

 

Make sure you are getting enough electrolytes.

 

I find it difficult to do isometrics--it is hard for me to work against myself, but I would use elastic bands.

 

When you are sedentary, try listening to music with a strong beat--it can increase heart rate.

 

Listening to Rush Limbaugh will increase my heart rate.....

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Not for traveling, no.  At home I have no trouble getting exercise.  Farms have a neat way of always having something to do.  ;)

 

Interesting idea though - esp for someone at a desk for their job.

 

Listening to Rush Limbaugh will increase my heart rate.....

 

Ok, I have my limits.  It's my pulse I want to increase, not my stress level.  If what I'm at now (stress-wise) is the cause (doubtful, but if it is), I can only imagine how bad that would make it.  :lol:  When we're at FIL's he has Fox News on pretty much 24/7 - or at least all waking hours.  I've yet to decide if it provides me humor or stress, but after the first 15 minutes it certainly is boring!  (due to being so repetitive - other news stations get that way too, but no one I'm around watches them non-stop)

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