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I need some solid advice about future planning for DS1. I've thought about this so much that I'm completely overwhelmed. Should he graduate at the end of this year? Please help me think it through, from both sides.

 

Factors to consider:

- He is very mature and responsible; I have no worries about him going to college, academically or socially.

- No state funded DE here, also no needs based financial aide for us; I'm paying either way and that's ok.

- We are planning to move to California within the next 2-ish years. I don't want him to be negatively affected. He has not been preparing for a-g.

- He wants to major in math. My research into this says that U of our current state is a good choice, is commutable to where we live, and doesn't do DE

- I'm concerned about keeping all subjects going at the same time (in a single semester/year) for transcript purposes, given the level of courses he will be taking next year.

- His transcript would be light in literature and history, should he graduate this year. But maybe that's ok for a math major? He could also add something in for spring semester this year; Calc ends in December.

- SAT score is good

 

These are the courses he has taken or are currently in process:

 

Math: Alg 1, Alg 2, Geometry, pre-Calc, AP Calc BC, AP Statistics

 

Science: Chem, AP Bio, AP Env Sci, AP Chem

 

English: Rhetoric 1, Rhetoric 2, Greek Lit, Roman Lit

 

History: Greek History, Roman History

 

Foreign Lang: Arabic 1-4

 

Electives: AP Computer Science, Backyard Agriculture 1-2 (could be an extra-curricular or could have a better title), PE

 

Extra-curricular: 2nd degree tae kwan do black belt, WOOT, biking, working out, math tutoring, part time job

Edited by MomOfABunch
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Is he sure he wants to attend local U? And if so right now? My DS1 was a pretty traditional kid and has mentioned that he thought he would feel out of place even just a year or two younger if we did this with him. My daughter did graduduate early, and transferred into state school at 18. She isn't eligible for any freshman groups. She isnt able to attend any freshman group events/dinners such as leadership groups or even freshman church retreats because all freshman events swipe ids, and her id says she is a transfer sophmore so ....nothing freshman. She is only 18, so it has been a bit limiting.

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What will happen when you move to CA? Will he be able to maintain his in-state status (in some states the answer is yes, others no.)

 

Have you gone in person to meet with the registrar with you ds to ask point blank if they will refuse to allow him to enroll as a special student? We have lived near 4 yr universities that state they do not allow DE but when we met with them directly, they made an exception. I took standardized test scores, AP scores, and transcript with us to the meeting. Ds shared why he thought enrolling there vs a CC served his needs better. They listened and agreed.

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Is he sure he wants to attend local U? And if so right now? My DS1 was a pretty traditional kid and has mentioned that he thought he would feel out of place even just a year or two younger if we did this with him. My daughter did graduduate early, and transferred into state school at 18. She isn't eligible for any freshman groups. She isnt able to attend any freshman group events/dinners such as leadership groups or even freshman church retreats because all freshman events swipe ids, and her id says she is a transfer sophmore so ....nothing freshman. She is only 18, so it has been a bit limiting.

This is an interesting point I hadn't considered.

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What will happen when you move to CA? Will he be able to maintain his in-state status (in some states the answer is yes, others no.)

 

Have you gone in person to meet with the registrar with you ds to ask point blank if they will refuse to allow him to enroll as a special student? We have lived near 4 yr universities that state they do not allow DE but when we met with them directly, they made an exception. I took standardized test scores, AP scores, and transcript with us to the meeting. Ds shared why he thought enrolling there vs a CC served his needs better. They listened and agreed.

Oh really. I hadn't thought to try that. Thank you.

 

Once we move (details in process), he can stay in state in our current state as long as he stays at the same school.  They don't have you prove residency every year, just the first year.

 

I definitely would not leave him in our current state and move across the country if he were a freshman, but if he had a year or so left (which would be the case if he started next year), was 18, could keep in state tuition, and grandparents are close by, I think it may be fine.

Edited by MomOfABunch
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I need some solid advice about future planning for DS1. I've thought about this so much that I'm completely overwhelmed. Should he graduate at the end of this year? Please help me think it through, from both sides.

 

Factors to consider:

- He is very mature and responsible; I have no worries about him going to college, academically or socially.

- No state funded DE here, also no needs based financial aide for us; I'm paying either way and that's ok.

- We are planning to move to California within the next 2-ish years. I don't want him to be negatively affected. He has not been preparing for a-g.

- He wants to major in math. My research into this says that U of our current state is a good choice, is commutable to where we live, and doesn't do DE

- I'm concerned about keeping all subjects going at the same time (in a single semester/year) for transcript purposes, given the level of courses he will be taking next year.

- His transcript would be light in literature and history, should he graduate this year. But maybe that's ok for a math major? He could also add something in for spring semester this year; Calc ends in December.

- SAT score is good

 

These are the courses he has taken or are currently in process:

 

Math: Alg 1, Alg 2, Geometry, pre-Calc, AP Calc BC, AP Statistics

 

Science: Chem, AP Bio, AP Env Sci, AP Chem

 

English: Rhetoric 1, Rhetoric 2, Greek Lit, Roman Lit

 

History: Greek History, Roman History

 

Foreign Lang: Arabic 1-4

 

Electives: AP Computer Science, Backyard Agriculture 1-2 (could be an extra-curricular or could have a better title), PE

 

Extra-curricular: 2nd degree tae kwan do black belt, WOOT, biking, working out, math tutoring, part time job

 

His history/social sciences are weak (there should be American history, and U.S. government/economics in there), but otherwise it looks good to me. I'd graduate him.

 

Once y'all are in California, he can begin taking classes at a local community college and then transfer to CalState or UC. If he does that, it won't matter what he did in high school (although IMHO he should have American history and government).

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I did graduate ds a year early because we receive need-based aid. He received a nice renewable scholarship on top of that. His original goal had been to attend there and then transfer for a major we do not offer, he considered transferring and applied last year. None of the schools offered enough transfer money to make transferring a good choice - he wants little debt. So he is happy staying at this school as a math major. So yes, consider how being a transfer student, especially if would be one with out of state status might affect activities available and funding. 

 

I also agree that I would add US history and physics. US History could be tied with American Lit and I would choose either up to the Civil War or Post Civil War - contemporary history. 

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US History would be an easy add this year.  I have another child using Hakim as a read aloud (I realize not the best choice for DS1).  We could supplement with other stuff in the spring and make it enough for a high school credit.  He hasn't started Lit this year yet, I could easily change it to American Lit.

 

I could also add history from middle school to his transcript.  He did most of SWB Ancient History in 8th.  In 7th he read all four SOTW, supplemented with some other stuff (he didn't HS from the beginning and hadn't read them)...this may be stretching it.  

 

My DH is planning on spending a month in Tunisia over the holidays visiting family (and we spent a couple months there last year and visited Rome and Athens).  DS1 could go with him, for an immersion history/language course....      

 

Adding physics would be harder, he's already doing AP Chem this year.  

Edited by MomOfABunch
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US History would be an easy add this year. I have another child using Hakim as a read aloud (I realize not the best choice for DS1). We could supplement with other stuff in the spring and make it enough for a high school credit. He hasn't started Lit this year yet, I could easily change it to American Lit.

 

I could also add history from middle school to his transcript. He did most of SWB Ancient History in 8th. In 7th he read all four SOTW, supplemented with some other stuff (he didn't HS from the beginning and hadn't read them)...this may be stretching it.

 

My DH is planning on spending a month in Tunisia over the holidays visiting family (and we spent a couple months there last year and visited Rome and Athens). DS1 could go with him, for an immersion history/language course....

 

Adding physics would be harder, he's already doing AP Chem this year.

Honestly, this entire post makes me wonder why the rush to graduate him early. He is far from having finished high school level courses and the courses you are describing do not sound high school level for an advanced student graduating early. (I wouldn't count some of those as high school level either way.)

 

Why not pursue DE either IRL or online if on-campus is not an option for math? It seems like the only subject he is advanced in. (Or self-study via opencourseware?)

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US History would be an easy add this year.  I have another child using Hakim as a read aloud (I realize not the best choice for DS1).  We could supplement with other stuff in the spring and make it enough for a high school credit.  He hasn't started Lit this year yet, I could easily change it to American Lit.

 

I could also add history from middle school to his transcript.  He did most of SWB Ancient History in 8th.  In 7th he read all four SOTW, supplemented with some other stuff (he didn't HS from the beginning and hadn't read them)...this may be stretching it.  

 

My DH is planning on spending a month in Tunisia over the holidays visiting family (and we spent a couple months there last year and visited Rome and Athens).  DS1 could go with him, for an immersion history/language course....      

 

Adding physics would be harder, he's already doing AP Chem this year.  

If your son is heading into STEM major, I would not graduate him if he hasn't studied physics.  Physics is a required course for many STEM majors, and he will be at a disadvantage in college since the vast majority of his classmates will have studied physics in high school. 

 

Fwiw, we don't have good DE options in my neck of the woods.  My kids use MIT OCW once they are beyond BC Calc and the science APs.  This has worked out well and enabled them graduate high school at 18 and begin college with their age peers.

 

Good luck with your decision.  There is obviously never one right answer.

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These are all good points.  This is exactly the kind of feedback I was hoping to get, thank you.  I am probably stressing myself out unnecessarily; I tend to do that.

 

Re previous history, I realize they're not up to par, which is why I didn't include them to begin with.  

 

The thing I think I'm most concerned about for him, is the move I know is coming.  I don't want him to get caught in a place where he doesn't qualify for in state tuition in any state.  If he graduates with his peers, this will happen.  Financially, he needs to have the option of in state tuition.  Hopefully he will be able to get scholarships and have more options, but I can't count on that 100%.

 

There is some flexibility regarding timing on the move, but we decided to make the move to CA before DS1 and DD turn 18, in 2019. This is primarily to ensure DD has the services she needs (autism) post 18, which she will lose in our current situation on their 18th birthday.  She needs the support, respite and programs she has now.  Daily life with her will be very, very difficult without them.  Career-wise, CA is also an improvement for myself and DH.  I wish we had made this decision before DS1 picked his courses for this year, but we didn't.  So here we are.  

 

I'm looking for the best option for DS1, given these circumstances.  Graduating this year is an option, but the best one? That's definitely debatable.  If not that, then what?  Ideally, he'd have more time in high school and round out lit and history, take DE courses, etc.  That's what the original plan was.  But, I didn't fully understand the difference in services pre and post 18 for DD.  She cannot be without home services.  I cannot emphasize this point strongly enough.  At the same time, I don't want her needs to decide his future, kwim?  

 

 

 

 

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These are all good points.  This is exactly the kind of feedback I was hoping to get, thank you.  I am probably stressing myself out unnecessarily; I tend to do that.

 

Re previous history, I realize they're not up to par, which is why I didn't include them to begin with.  

 

The thing I think I'm most concerned about for him, is the move I know is coming.  I don't want him to get caught in a place where he doesn't qualify for in state tuition in any state.  If he graduates with his peers, this will happen.  Financially, he needs to have the option of in state tuition.  Hopefully he will be able to get scholarships and have more options, but I can't count on that 100%.

 

There is some flexibility regarding timing on the move, but we decided to make the move to CA before DS1 and DD turn 18, in 2019. This is primarily to ensure DD has the services she needs (autism) post 18, which she will lose in our current situation on their 18th birthday.  She needs the support, respite and programs she has now.  Daily life with her will be very, very difficult without them.  Career-wise, CA is also an improvement for myself and DH.  I wish we had made this decision before DS1 picked his courses for this year, but we didn't.  So here we are.  

 

I'm looking for the best option for DS1, given these circumstances.  Graduating this year is an option, but the best one? That's definitely debatable.  If not that, then what?  Ideally, he'd have more time in high school and round out lit and history, take DE courses, etc.  That's what the original plan was.  But, I didn't fully understand the difference in services pre and post 18 for DD.  She cannot be without home services.  I cannot emphasize this point strongly enough.  At the same time, I don't want her needs to decide his future, kwim?  

 

 

There are several different issues here. 

 

First, does your dd have a social worker assigned to her case?  Does she qualify for SSI?  (I am completely unfamiliar with your situation, so I am not sure how disabled your dd is.)  Have you contacted the Dept of Rehabilitative Services to see what resources they offer at age 18?  (My ds actually qualified for more services at 18 than he did under 18, but he doesn't need daily home interventions, so it sounds radically different than our situation.)  I would tap out all local contacts before I assuem she doesn't qualify for services after 18.

 

Second, your ds.  I personally think graduating him early is unfair to him b/c he does not sound ready to graduate.  I have kids I could have graduated early, and their academic level has been far beyond what you are describing.  Graduating early can limit options.  It is not a path I would jump into litghtly bc you feel cornered.  At minimum, I would consider a Dec of next yr graduation and spring enrollment in order for him to be considered in-state.  Or I see if I could somehow fund your dd's needs for a few months and move a little later.  Or I would contact the local university directly, present your situation, and ask how he can keep his in-state status if you move.  

 

IOW, I would do a lot more research before I made any decisions.

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There are several different issues here. 

 

First, does your dd have a social worker assigned to her case?  Does she qualify for SSI?  (I am completely unfamiliar with your situation, so I am not sure how disabled your dd is.)  Have you contacted the Dept of Rehabilitative Services to see what resources they offer at age 18?  (My ds actually qualified for more services at 18 than he did under 18, but he doesn't need daily home interventions, so it sounds radically different than our situation.)  I would tap out all local contacts before I assuem she doesn't qualify for services after 18.

 

Yes, for SSI and she actually has three different social workers.  The funding for the daily help she needs, and is the most necessary, comes from a program that's actually for keeping kids in their homes and out of foster care.  That program has an age cap.  She will keep her current Medicaid waiver post 18, but it is not the right waiver needed to access adult services comparable to what she's getting now as a child from the other funding source.  She's been on the waiting list for the right waiver for that, for years.  Makes perfect sense, right? 

 

The advice from her social workers is to begin preparing for her future now: move her to a state that has better services for post 18. 2 recommended Arizona, California and Hawaii.  I did a lot of research on this and they're right.  Services there provide more of what she needs and there isn't the crazy long waiting list like she is on here.  Also, I can transfer within my company and keep my job if we move to California; I just have to give them 90 days notice.   Decision made.

 

Second, your ds.  I personally think graduating him early is unfair to him b/c he does not sound ready to graduate.  I have kids I could have graduated early, and their academic level has been far beyond what you are describing.  Graduating early can limit options.  It is not a path I would jump into litghtly bc you feel cornered.  At minimum, I would consider a Dec of next yr graduation and spring enrollment in order for him to be considered in-state.  Or I see if I could somehow fund your dd's needs for a few months and move a little later.  Or I would contact the local university directly, present your situation, and ask how he can keep his in-state status if you move.  

 

​Without the situation with DD, I absolutely agree with you.  I wasn't planning to graduate him this year; hence the lack of physics and history.  I don't want him to get screwed over because we will be moving at a bad time for him.

 

IOW, I would do a lot more research before I made any decisions.

 

Yes, you're right.  

 

Edited by MomOfABunch
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Normally I would agree with 8FillTheHeart: it does not sound as if he has done work above and beyond what constitutes normal high school that I would jump to graduate him early. I also think the lack of physics is unfortunate ( but not a hill to die on;I teach calc based physics, and many students did not have physics in high school. The students' success is not determined by their prior physics, but solely by their math ability and executive functioning skills)

 

However, even with the light humanities coursework, he has done more than many kids who graduate from public school.

 

And in the light of your upcoming move, I would base the decision whether to graduate him or not on what is the better way for him to retain in state student status. That's too much money at stake that I'd be willing to risk that because I want him to take physics and a bit more humanities. You need to check that he satisfies the admissions requirements, and you need to speak to the registrar and/or financial office of the local college he wants to attend to find out about your move will affect his residency status.

 

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 But, I didn't fully understand the difference in services pre and post 18 for DD.  She cannot be without home services.  I cannot emphasize this point strongly enough.  At the same time, I don't want her needs to decide his future, kwim?  

 

Her needs are needs.

In the big picture, his graduating this year or next year is not going to make a difference of the magnitude the availability of services will have for your DD.

If you must move, you must move. Figuring out which colleges he can attend for what price strikes me as the smaller problem.

 

 

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Normally I would agree with 8FillTheHeart: it does not sound as if he has done work above and beyond what constitutes normal high school that I would jump to graduate him early. I also think the lack of physics is unfortunate ( but not a hill to die on;I teach calc based physics, and many students did not have physics in high school. The students' success is not determined by their prior physics, but solely by their math ability and executive functioning skills)

 

However, even with the light humanities coursework, he has done more than many kids who graduate from public school.

 

And in the light of your upcoming move, I would base the decision whether to graduate him or not on what is the better way for him to retain in state student status. That's too much money at stake that I'd be willing to risk that because I want him to take physics and a bit more humanities. You need to check that he satisfies the admissions requirements, and you need to speak to the registrar and/or financial office of the local college he wants to attend to find out about your move will affect his residency status.

 

 

Her needs are needs.

In the big picture, his graduating this year or next year is not going to make a difference of the magnitude the availability of services will have for your DD.

If you must move, you must move. Figuring out which colleges he can attend for what price strikes me as the smaller problem.

 

 

Thank you for completely validating my concerns and thinking.

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Having had a child who couldn't live at home without the appropriate Medicaid waiver (that thankfully we could get without a waitlist in our state), I recommend moving. Good for your caseworkers for recommending it now, before it's too late.

 

Definately talk to the local college about residency & if he meets admissions requirenents now, but yeah, I'd move to access good adult services in a heartbeat.

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Ok, I just saw that they don't turn 18 until 2019.  You could still have him in school for another entire yr beyond this one before he needs to graduate.  You could have him take physics next yr.  If he graduates in May of 2019, then he can start in June of 2019.  You can move that summer to CA and be there before she turns 18.    You could even graduate him in Dec of 2018 and have him focus just on 2-3 subjects as semester courses and spring admit for Jan of 2019.  

 

Or am I missing something?  I don't see the urgency to graduate in May of 2018 unless your dd needs to be there for over 12 months prior to turning 18?

 

Edited by 8FillTheHeart
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Hi Op,

 

Just wanted to add that in my state if you take any class with residency status (at any state school including community college), you retain that status. In order to maintain that option for your son, he could register for a concurrent online 1 credit class and as long as he continues to take classes , he would retain residency in my state. (My DD1 took a PE online walking class- so it doesnt have to be super accademic).I am not sure if that is the same where you live, but it might be something to look into.

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Does a math major at the state university need Physics? Does he want to graduate early? Has he taken the ACT/SAT and were his scores good enough to get financial aid? If the answers to all of these are yes, I'd add in the light American History and graduate him. He has 2 years of AP math, 3 years of AP science and one AP elective. He definitely has more advanced work than the average high school student completes, and unless your state U is super competitive, he should be in great shape. 

 

Moving and making those arrangements for your dd is a much bigger deal than how many history credits your ds has when he graduates. Dealing with A-G requirements in CA has always sounded intimidating if you haven't lived under the system and weren't prepared. You could check, as 8 suggested, and see if he could enroll with special permission without graduating, but if he plans to stay at that U, I don't see the benefit, and if he won't have to prove residency again (neither of mine were asked after the initial entrance - two different states), then I don't see why not go ahead.

 

For reference, his transcript far outweighs my dd's transcript (although hers was a bit more balanced) and I graduated her a year early with just 21 DE credits (no APs). It worked out beautifully for her. She is a sophomore in college now and excelled from the beginning. He doesn't have to have exceeded the possibilities for high school in order to be prepared for college and have an early graduation work for him.

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Ok, I just saw that they don't turn 18 until 2019.  You could still have him in school for another entire yr beyond this one before he needs to graduate.  You could have him take physics next yr.  If he graduates in May of 2019, then he can start in June of 2019.  You can move that summer to CA and be there before she turns 18.    You could even graduate him in Dec of 2018 and have him focus just on 2-3 subjects as semester courses and spring admit for Jan of 2019.  

 

Or am I missing something?  I don't see the urgency to graduate in May of 2018 unless your dd needs to be there for over 12 months prior to turning 18?

 

Yes, their 18th birthday is about 2 years away.  I was considering graduating him and sending him to UVA next fall, continuing to live with us for his freshman year and then moving during his 2nd year, right around their 18th birthday.  He would keep in state tuition in VA, as long as he finished at UVA.  I don't love the idea of moving across the country from him, but I'm sure he would be fine.

 

DD just has to be physically in the state; there's no waiting period that I know of.

 

Is there a reason not to move now?  If you move now your ds would be in-state in CA and you wouldn't have to worry about not having in-state status.  Can your dd receive the services she needs in CA as a minor?

 

You know, I was talking to DH today and he said the very same thing.  I've been so stressed out by DD potentially losing services that I didn't see this obvious option.  I'll have to make some phone calls about her services to confirm, but I believe she can get what she needs in CA as a minor.

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Does a math major at the state university need Physics? ​Not for admissions, and not for the major. Does he want to graduate early? Yes.  Has he taken the ACT/SAT and were his scores good enough to get financial aid? Yes. If the answers to all of these are yes, I'd add in the light American History and graduate him. He has 2 years of AP math, 3 years of AP science and one AP elective. He definitely has more advanced work than the average high school student completes, and unless your state U is super competitive, he should be in great shape. It is competitive, but not super competitive.  They favor in state students.  Compared with the transcripts of others that I know were accepted, I'm not worried about him.

 

Moving and making those arrangements for your dd is a much bigger deal than how many history credits your ds has when he graduates. Dealing with A-G requirements in CA has always sounded intimidating if you haven't lived under the system and weren't prepared. You could check, as 8 suggested, and see if he could enroll with special permission without graduating, but if he plans to stay at that U, I don't see the benefit, This is a large piece of possibly graduating him this early.  If he's going to go to UVA and can get in now, what's the benefit of DEing there? and if he won't have to prove residency again (neither of mine were asked after the initial entrance - two different states), then I don't see why not go ahead.  He won't, just the first year.

 

For reference, his transcript far outweighs my dd's transcript (although hers was a bit more balanced) and I graduated her a year early with just 21 DE credits (no APs). It worked out beautifully for her. She is a sophomore in college now and excelled from the beginning. He doesn't have to have exceeded the possibilities for high school in order to be prepared for college and have an early graduation work for him.

 

Edited by MomOfABunch
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I've been stressing so much about these issues, this thread is really helping me to get past that and see the available options.  Thank you all so much.  From where I'm sitting right now, I see these options:

 

1. Stay in VA for 2 more years.  DS graduates now and starts college in state and finishes in VA.  We move to CA halfway through and he stays in VA to finish his undergrad degree.

 

2. Stay in VA for 1 more year. DS graduates next year and starts college in state and finishes in VA.  We move to CA during his first year and he stays in VA to finish his undergrad degree.

 

3. Stay in VA for 1 more year. DS continues in high school, we move and he gets in state in CA, but does not have a-g requirements, so no U of C

 

4. Move to CA ASAP.  DD gets services, DS does DE at CC for the next 2 years, gets in state in CA, is prepared to apply to U of C or wherever he wants

 

 

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4. Move to CA ASAP. DD gets services, DS does DE at CC for the next 2 years, gets in state in CA, is prepared to apply to U of C or wherever he wants

PM quark. She has gone through the UC application process last year, her son did dual enrollment early and is thinking of being a math major. Her son dual enrolled at their local community college and at UCB.

 

It is possible to knock out a-g requirements with dual enrollment and high test scores. There are a few boardies whose kids got into UC without fulfilling all the a-g requirements through approved a-g courses.

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Finding out that the school you are talking about is UVA, I am wondering if graduating this yr is viable option.  UVA accepts about 40% of IS applicants.  That might not be super competitive, but it is far from a given.  60-70% acceptance rates are far more guarantees than 40%.  Are you prepared to immediately put together all of his materials for applications: transcripts, course descriptions, school profile?  Does he have any subject test scores?  (I am not sure if UVA requires them of homeschoolers or not, but if he has them, they would be helpful.)

 

Bc he is graduating from high school in VA, he will be competing against VA high school grads.  VA's advanced diploma requirements are 4 English (good), 4 math (good), 4 science (good) 4 history (lacking)(Courses completed to satisfy this requirement shall include U.S. and Virginia History, U.S. and Virginia Government, and two courses in either world history or geography or both.), 3 foreign language (good), personal finance and econ (??), and 3 electives. http://www.doe.virginia.gov/instruction/graduation/advanced_studies.shtml  

 

I don't want to add to your stress b/c you sound completely overwhelmed.  But, at the same time, moving forward with a game plan that might not actually come to fruition isn't going to help your family at all.  You won't know until until April if he is accepted unless he submits his application within the next month.

 

Do you know anyone at the university that you could talk to?  Someone who is familiar with UVA in-state admissions, especially homeschoolers, would be a really good source to help guide you forward.  I personally would push for the Nov 1 application deadline so that you will have an answer in Jan so that it will help make some decisions clearer for you.

 

 

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I would wait until the year they would graduate from public/private school.  When I started this journey I was all about having my child graduate at 16 and go onto college. Fast forward today I don't want that for my children. I want them to enjoy their childhood and freedom for as long as possible.  My DD17 is unoffically graduated.  I will offically graduate her 2018 just like she would in a public school.  Her senior year consist of a few college courses, preparing for colleges (just send out applications), and volunteer work. Now she is looking for a job now that she has her licence.  She will be an adult soon enough, I no longer wish to push it.

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Thank you all for your input. I've been stressing about DD and her services and not wanting DS to be negatively affected in the process. I think I've worked through a large amount of that stress and am in a place to think about it more clearly. We need to figure how quickly we can pull it off because it's looking pretty clear that moving sooner rather than later will solve this problem.

I made some calls today and DD can get what she needs under Medicaid funding in CA both as a child and as an adult. They actually told me that it will be EASIER to get adult services if she's already receiving them as a child. I guess that makes sense.

DS could DE for 2 full years, which was the plan before DD's services became an issue. 2 years of DE plus what he has already done will put him in an excellent place when he does graduate.

I'm feeling pretty good about this today; now onto the logistics of moving a family of 7 across the country!

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